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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Riitta Hekkala and Mari-Klara Stein

This study examines emotionologies (Stearns & Stearns, 1985), that is, attitudes that members of an inter-organizational information systems (IOIS) project hold toward…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines emotionologies (Stearns & Stearns, 1985), that is, attitudes that members of an inter-organizational information systems (IOIS) project hold toward emotions and their appropriate expression and regulation in this project. In order to understand attitudes toward emotions and emotion regulation, we suggest the adoption of the concept of emotion structure, consisting of emotion rules and resources (Callahan, 2004).

Methodology/approach

To investigate the kinds of emotionologies present in this IOIS development project, we have chosen a qualitative case study approach. Our data consists of 41 qualitative interviews, collected in two phases.

Findings

We trace how emotion rules and corresponding emotion regulation strategies change among the sub-groups working in the project throughout their first year of collaborating. We show that organizational actors are skilled emotion managers, whose behavior is guided not only by many collective emotion rules (professional, organizational, social) but also by personal emotion rules. Our findings also suggest the need to critically reflect on certain emotion rules, such as those pertaining to the expression of fear and anger, and their potential positive and negative implications on project work.

Research implications

We argue that group emotionologies with their professional, organizational, and social emotion rules interact with personal emotion rules, resulting in interesting emotion regulation strategies that often try to minimize emotional dissonance, sometimes at the expense of risking open conflict among project members. With this in mind, one theoretical and practical suggestion is to further explore the potential constructive implications of experiencing and expressing fear in projects.

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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Naveen Kumar Jain, Nitin Pangarkar and Yuan Lin

Research on international experience notes its positive influence on subsequent international expansion by firms. We test this relationship in the context of the Indian…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on international experience notes its positive influence on subsequent international expansion by firms. We test this relationship in the context of the Indian software industry whose offerings, unlike many other services, are storable implying that delivery can be separated from production.

Design/methodology/approach

We analyzed the domestic expansion of a sample of publicly listed Indian software firms over the period 2000–2009 with help of Poisson regression.

Findings

We find that even internationally experienced Indian software firms might prefer to expand domestically because of limited financial and managerial resources and concerns about diluting their cost advantage. The storable and separable nature of software services will support this strategy of serving clients remotely. The domestic expansion of assets will, however, be slower for firms with the highest level of industry accreditation. It will also be slower if there are institutional pressures in the form of rivals locating development centers near clients in developed countries.

Originality/value

Our results demonstrate that international experience alone is not sufficient for firms to expand overseas.

Details

Emerging Market Firms in the Global Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-066-7

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2005

Hope Corman, Kelly Noonan, Nancy E. Reichman and Dhaval Dave

We use postpartum survey data linked to medical records and city-level drug prices to estimate the demand for illicit drugs among pregnant women. We find that a $10…

Abstract

We use postpartum survey data linked to medical records and city-level drug prices to estimate the demand for illicit drugs among pregnant women. We find that a $10 increase in the retail price of a gram of pure cocaine decreases illicit drug use by 12–15%. The estimated price effects for heroin are lower than for cocaine and are less robust across alternative model specifications. This study provides the first estimates of the effects of drug prices on prenatal drug use and yields important information about the potential of drug enforcement as a tool for reducing illicit drug use among pregnant women.

Details

Substance Use: Individual Behaviour, Social Interactions, Markets and Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-361-7

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2005

Björn Lindgren and Michael Grossman

Six papers on individual behaviour are included in this volume. The first three are devoted to the determinants of individual consumption behaviour, the next two analyse…

Abstract

Six papers on individual behaviour are included in this volume. The first three are devoted to the determinants of individual consumption behaviour, the next two analyse the impact of individual substance use on labour market performance and criminal activities, respectively, while the last one challenges recent research, which claims that the increase in the prescription of antidepressants is the major factor behind the observed reduction in suicide rates during the 1990s.

Details

Substance Use: Individual Behaviour, Social Interactions, Markets and Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-361-7

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2005

Abstract

Details

Substance Use: Individual Behaviour, Social Interactions, Markets and Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-361-7

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2005

Abstract

Details

Substance Use: Individual Behaviour, Social Interactions, Markets and Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-361-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Arun Gupta, Ruth Bevan and Akshya Vasudev

The 2006 Post Graduate Medical Education Trust Board (PMETB) trainees' survey indicated inadequacies in handover procedures amongst medical and psychiatry trainees…

Abstract

Purpose

The 2006 Post Graduate Medical Education Trust Board (PMETB) trainees' survey indicated inadequacies in handover procedures amongst medical and psychiatry trainees nationwide; and in 2007 a local psychiatry trainees' survey found inadequate handover procedures. The purpose of this paper is to show how to improve handover practice through standard setting and sequential audit.

Design/methodology/approach

A Trust wide Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for handover was developed. Trainees were audited on perception of handover experiences (2008, 2009 and 2010).

Findings

The audit revealed that the SOP was not consistently followed. Handing over “active problems” (AP) was perceived to occur frequently in 2008 (93.75 per cent), improved in 2009 (100 per cent for AP, 98 per cent for “problems which may arise”, (PA)); however deteriorated in 2010 (93 per cent for AP, 69 per cent for PA). Trainee satisfaction rates with handover improved each year (57 per cent in 2008, 75 per cent in 2009, 87 per cent in 2010, X2=3.7, df=2, p=0.16).

Practical implications

SOP development, subsequent audits and sharing of results improved handover practice. This has implications for training and patient safety. This project demonstrates a method of improving handover practices in a large mental health trust.

Originality/value

The work conducted is of interest to those working in psychiatry, not only from an education and training perspective, but also for clinical practice, in the UK as well as internationally.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2018

Fiona M. Kay

Building on relational inequality theory, this paper incorporates social capital as a device to trace the flow of resources through relationships originating within and…

Abstract

Building on relational inequality theory, this paper incorporates social capital as a device to trace the flow of resources through relationships originating within and beyond organizations. I draw on a survey of over 1,700 lawyers to evaluate key dynamics of social capital that shape earnings: bridging and bonding, reciprocity exchanges and sponsorship, and boundary maintenance. The findings show social capital lends a lift to law graduates through bridges to professional careers and sponsorship following job entry. Racial minorities, however, suffer a shortfall of personal networks to facilitate job searches, and once having secured jobs, minorities experience social closure practices by clients and colleagues that disadvantage them in their professional work. A sizeable earnings gap remains between racial minority and white lawyers after controlling for human and social capitals, social closure practices, and organizational context. This earnings gap is particularly large among racial minorities with more years of experience and those working in large law firms. The findings demonstrate the importance of identifying the interrelations that connect social network and organizational context to impact social inequality.

Abstract

Details

The Emergence of the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-994-7

Abstract

Details

Culturally Responsive Strategies for Reforming STEM Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-405-9

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