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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2019

Alhassan G. Mumuni, Karen M. Lancendorfer, Kelley A. O’Reilly and Amy MacMillan

This paper examines the role that attitudes toward online product reviews (OPRs), perceived credibility of OPRs and perceived benefit of OPRs play as antecedents of…

1282

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the role that attitudes toward online product reviews (OPRs), perceived credibility of OPRs and perceived benefit of OPRs play as antecedents of consumers’ reliance on OPRs in purchase decisions. A conceptual model of relationships investigated posits that attitudes drive reliance and are in turn driven by perceived benefit and credibility of OPRs. The study also examines gender differences in the constructs and their inter-relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a structured self-administered survey of US consumers are used to estimate parameters of a structural equation model (SEM) of the relationships. Gender differences in the structural relationships are tested using multi-group SEM, while gender differences in reliance, attitudes, benefit and credibility are tested using independent-samples t-tests.

Findings

Results show a strong positive effect of attitudes toward OPRs on reliance on OPRs. In turn, perceived benefit and credibility of OPRs are strong positive drivers of attitudes toward OPRs, with benefit having a greater impact. Structural relationships among the constructs are invariant across the two gender groups. However, there is a statistically significant difference between males and females in reliance on OPRs, with males exhibiting a tendency to rely more on OPRs than females.

Originality/value

The study introduces two new constructs to the literature – reliance on OPRs and global attitudes toward OPRs – and provides initial conceptualizations and operationalizations. The specific results underscore the relevance and importance of further research on these constructs and their relationships with other OPR-relevant constructs. They also provide initial indications of gender differences in consumers’ perceptions of OPRs and relationships among these and reliance on OPRs that are worthy of additional research attention.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Kelley A. O’Reilly, Alhassan G. Mumuni, Stephen J. Newell and Branden J. Addicott

This study aims to examine the relative impact of three drivers affecting consumers’ usage consideration for a brand extension into a service category using data from…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relative impact of three drivers affecting consumers’ usage consideration for a brand extension into a service category using data from actual consumers of a national oil change retailer contemplating various service brand extensions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were collected in two separate surveys using structured self-administered questionnaires. Three drivers were measured for their effect on consumers’ usage consideration for service brand extensions (dependent variable), namely, parent brand evaluation, extension fit and degree of service intensity of the extension.

Findings

The results indicate that parent brand evaluations are the strongest drivers of brand extension usage consideration, regardless of the extension fit or the degree of service intensity of the extension. In addition, the findings suggest that the closer the fit to the parent brand, the more likely the extension will be considered. In contrast, consumers are less likely to consider using an extension as the level of service intensity increases.

Originality/value

This study’s use of actual customers of the brand, for real service brand extensions provides a higher degree of external validity than previous work in this area, and it yields a deeper understanding of the criteria used by consumers when evaluating service brand extensions. The study also provides managerial implications that are of practical value to academics and practitioners alike.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Kelley A. O’Reilly, Amy MacMillan, Alhassan G. Mumuni and Karen M. Lancendorfer

The purpose of this study is to examine factors affecting the extent of consumers’ use of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM), specifically online product reviews (OPRs)…

2109

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine factors affecting the extent of consumers’ use of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM), specifically online product reviews (OPRs), during their decision-making process. It also examines their motives for using OPRs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an exploratory qualitative research methodology involving observation and free-flowing face-to-face interviews with consumers who have previously made a purchase online and who read OPRs during the decision-making process. An adaptation of the grounded theory method is used for collection, coding and data analysis.

Findings

Findings confirm previously uncovered motives for consumers’ use of OPRs. In addition, the findings suggest that two previously unidentified factors influence the extent of consumers’ use of OPRs: “decision-making drive” and “decision-making drag”. Decision-making drive is a mental momentum created when one or more factors that enhance decision-making readiness are present. This momentum tends to accelerate the decision-making process and shorten the information search process, leading to a reduction in the extent of OPR use. In contrast, decision-making drag is a mental resistance created when one or more factors that impede decision-making readiness are present. This resistance tends to decelerate the decision-making process and lengthen the information search process, leading to an increase in the extent of OPR use.

Originality/value

Focused on the pre-consumption phase of eWOM, between the stages of product need recognition and information search, this study is the first to identify decision-making drive and decision-making drag as additional psychological mechanisms affecting the extent of OPR use by consumers. For marketers, understanding these mechanisms has strategic marketing implications that can provide guidance to brands, websites and online review systems.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Kelley O'Reilly and David Paper

The purpose of this study is to explore the attitudes and beliefs of front‐line employees regarding how customer‐company interactions might be improved. Since front‐line…

3281

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the attitudes and beliefs of front‐line employees regarding how customer‐company interactions might be improved. Since front‐line employees are closely connected to customers, the resultant experiences and relationships with customers are highly dependent on their actions. However, little is written from the perspective of front‐line employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative approach and employing an adaptation of the grounded theory method, this study uses front‐line employee participants with data collection occurring over a six‐month period. A variety of data sources were used including open‐ended reciprocal interviews, member‐checking interviews, observation, and collection of participant and researcher artifacts.

Findings

Findings suggest that organizational changes initiated by management create strategically constructed silos that force implementation through people and systems to control and standardize the service interface and resultant customer experience(s). This reactive and inwardly focused construction of silos often serves company rather than customer needs and can result in deteriorating service levels based on the type of customer‐company interaction occurring.

Originality/value

Contrary to how most customer service processes are designed by management, not all customer‐company interactions are alike and vary both in regard to the degree of knowledge needed by front‐line employees to fully serve customers, and the routine or non‐routine nature of the interaction. A two‐by‐two matrix is presented to highlight the impacts of silos occurring for various interaction types.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Kelley O'Reilly and David Paper

A paucity of literature considers a growing trend within the retail space whereby franchise companies and their franchisees market and sell products and services across…

Abstract

Purpose

A paucity of literature considers a growing trend within the retail space whereby franchise companies and their franchisees market and sell products and services across multiple channels, including company‐owned retail stores. This case study aims to explore the processes used to support the customer experience, the control mechanisms that are in place, and the channels by which these customer‐company interactions occur.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach employing an adaptation of the grounded theory method for data collection, coding, and analysis was used and this study specifically focused on an international van‐based service franchise during the integration of the franchise company's service into the retail brick‐and‐mortar locations of the parent company. Participants included retail employees of the parent company, franchise company support staff, franchisees, and third‐party call center agents working for the parent company.

Findings

Findings suggest a relationship exists between the alignment of the internal factors of the customer relationship management (CRM) experience (e.g. people, processes, and technology) and the relative strength or weakness of each external factor (e.g. customer, company, and competition). Moreover, it is postulated that weaker customer‐centric service results in greater misalignment of internal factors and leads to larger service variability, or sub‐optimized CRM.

Originality/value

The unique contribution of this research is the juxtaposition of the disparate marketing approaches of the parent company and franchisees and the subsequent impact on CRM efforts of the company. A conceptual model of internal and external factors of the CRM experience is presented.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Kelley O'Reilly and David Paper

A paucity of research on the motivations and goals of vendors who develop electronic customer relationship management (eCRM) tools and systems exists in the literature…

2262

Abstract

Purpose

A paucity of research on the motivations and goals of vendors who develop electronic customer relationship management (eCRM) tools and systems exists in the literature. This is an important gap in the literature because many eCRM systems are products of outsourcing (to vendors). This paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory case study focuses on an international van‐based service franchise and the experiences of the vendor, company, and franchisees as they design, develop, and implement certain eCRM tools. Participants include the president and founder of the eCRM vendor company, the chief executive officer, chief financial officer, and marketing director from the franchisor company, and six franchisees. This paper is triangulated via personal interviews, member‐checking interviews, and relevant literature from information systems (IS) and marketing.

Findings

Specifically, this paper sheds light on the role and influence of the vendor in the design, development, and delivery of eCRM tools. Managerial implications include: customer relationship management (CRM) requires a balance of online and offline activities; vendors may distort the balance between online and offline marketing efforts; and strategic policy should center on the priorities of the franchisor, franchisees, and end customers.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified knowledge gap by capturing the “voice” of the vendor who has historically been overlooked in the literature. The research insights are particularly salient for company managers and marketing practitioners alike. Study limitations and suggestions for future research are also discussed.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Kelley O'Reilly and Sherry Marx

Specifically focusing on one antecedent (information seeker's characteristics) for electronic word‐of‐mouth adoption and credibility assessments, the purpose of this paper…

8024

Abstract

Purpose

Specifically focusing on one antecedent (information seeker's characteristics) for electronic word‐of‐mouth adoption and credibility assessments, the purpose of this paper is to attempt to shed light on consumer motivations for making and taking online recommendations, and how technically savvy consumers assess credibility online.

Design/methodology/approach

To investigate the role and influence of word‐of‐mouth (WOM) amongst technically savvy online consumers, purposeful sampling was used to limit participants to those who have made online purchases and who spend more than three hours a day on the internet. Using an adaptation of the grounded theory method, this study was triangulated via one face‐to‐face interview with each participant, member‐checking, analysis of online communications deemed “not credible” by the participants, and through relevant literature from marketing and information systems (IS).

Findings

Analysis shows that participants exhibit more of a “bricks‐to‐clicks” than a “clicks‐to‐bricks” purchasing cycle. In addition to relying on customer reviews online, participants accept online WOM to enhance their self‐worth, avoid risk, or enact negativity bias. Additionally, assessment of online WOM credibility is based on four factors: the polarity and quantity of posts, the logic and articulation of posts, the ability to find corroborating sources, and the previous experience of participants with particular sellers.

Originality/value

Previous research in WOM has not specifically explored how technically savvy consumers assess the credibility of online information and how these consumers may help to identify future trends for online customer exchanges. This qualitative study fills this gap. Conceptual framework and managerial implications are discussed.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Len Tiu Wright

334

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Jeffrey D. Ford, Laurie W. Ford and Randall T. McNamara

Resistance to change has generally been understood as a result of personal experiences and assessments about the reliability of others. Accordingly, attempts are made to…

19598

Abstract

Resistance to change has generally been understood as a result of personal experiences and assessments about the reliability of others. Accordingly, attempts are made to alter these factors in order to win support and overcome resistance. But this understanding ignores resistance as a socially constructed reality in which people are responding more to the background conversations in which the change is being initiated than to the change itself. This paper proposes that resistance to change is a function of the ongoing background conversations that are being spoken and which create the context for both the change initiative and the responses to it. In this context, resistance is not a personal phenomenon, but a social systemic one in which resistance is maintained by the background conversations of the organization. Successfully dealing with this source of resistance requires distinguishing the background conversations and completing the past.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Jonathan H. Deacon

334

Abstract

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

1 – 10 of 272