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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Majed Muhtaseb

– To describe the fraudulent activity of investment manager Kirk S. Wright and to discuss its implications for investors and professional associations.

Abstract

Purpose

To describe the fraudulent activity of investment manager Kirk S. Wright and to discuss its implications for investors and professional associations.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes how Mr Wright established and built his fund business, how he solicited investors, how he falsified financial reporting to investors, how investors discovered his fraud and filed lawsuits, how the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) took disciplinary action, and how National Football League (NFL) players unsuccessfully sued the NFL and its players’ union for recommending Mr Wright’s firm. Draws lessons from the story for investors and associations.

Findings

Since hedge funds are not as strictly regulated as other investment vehicles, investors need to take extra steps to not fall prey to unscrupulous fund managers.

Originality/value

Detailed, informative case study.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1977

Keith Rowe

Wholesalers Wright & Green, well‐known in the voluntary group movement and part of the Linfood group, have become the first company to adopt Computer Automation's SyFA…

Abstract

Wholesalers Wright & Green, well‐known in the voluntary group movement and part of the Linfood group, have become the first company to adopt Computer Automation's SyFA system. Applications will include sales order processing, financial accounting, stock and management accounting, and cash and carry price control.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1941

The Ministry of Health have issued a Circular (No. 2198, November 25th, 1940) reminding local authorities of the measures which can usually be taken to protect the public…

Abstract

The Ministry of Health have issued a Circular (No. 2198, November 25th, 1940) reminding local authorities of the measures which can usually be taken to protect the public against the spread of the diseases commonly conveyed by food, i.e., diseases of the enteric group (typhoid and paratyphoid fevers), dysentery, food poisoning and intestinal parasitism. The Circular continues: One of the commonest causes of the spread of the enteric diseases is the contamination of food, including milk, by the hands of persons excreting the causal organisms of the disease, whether they are actually suffering from the disease, or are chronic carriers of the infection, or are persons temporarily excreting the causal organisms without themselves being ill. The Milk and Dairies Order, 1926, confers on medical officers of health in Articles 18 and 19 powers relating to infected milk supplies and to persons having access to the milk, milk vessels, etc., at registered premises whose employment may be likely to lead to the spread of infectious disease. It also requires generally under Article 15 that every person engaged in the milking of cows or the distribution or measuring of milk or otherwise having access to the milk or to the churns or other milk receptacles shall keep his clothing and person in a cleanly condition. Article 23 of the Order requires that in connection with the milking of cows the hands of the milker shall be thoroughly washed and dried before milking, and throughout the milking be kept free from contamination. With respect to food and drink in general, provision is made in Part III of the First Schedule to the Public Health (Infectious Diseases) Regulations, 1927, whereby on a report by the medical officer of health, the local authority can (1) in any case of enteric fever or dysentery occurring in the district by notice in writing require, in addition to other precautions, that the person specified in the notice shall discontinue any occupation connected with the preparation or handling of food or drink for human consumption and (2) require the medical examination by the medical officer of health or a medical officer acting on his behalf of a person suspected by the medical officer of health to be a carrier of enteric fever or dysentery infection who is employed in any trade or business connected with the preparation or handling of food or drink for human consumption, and can suspend such person from his employment for a specified period if as a result of the examination or from bacteriological or protozoological examination of material obtained at any such examination, of material obtained at any such examination, the medical officer of health is of opinion that the person is such a carrier. Apart, however, from conditions which can be dealt with by the temporary discontinuance of work by persons actually suffering from the disease or found to be carriers of it, experience shows that outbreaks of disease of the enteric group and of food poisoning are not uncommonly caused, or their range extended, by the handling of food by persons who have not previously been suspected to be suffering from or carrying disease, and the Minister is advised that a substantial number of consequential cases could be avoided if all persons engaged in the preparation or handling of food intended for sale were habitually to take the elementary precautions required by law. The relevant statutory provisions as regards food other than milk are those contained in Section 13 (1) of the Food and Drugs Act, 1938, which read as follows :—

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Keith Wright

Looks at the use of robotic cameras in television news studios and theproblems of navigating them accurately around their environment. Explains howthe robots recognize…

Abstract

Looks at the use of robotic cameras in television news studios and the problems of navigating them accurately around their environment. Explains how the robots recognize coded targets around the studio which they compare with a preprogrammed map. Discusses the choice between laser scanners and line scan tv cameras to scan the targets and why the line scan camera was chosen; because it exhibited a number of advantages including a lower cost than the laser. Concludes that camera robot development is still at an early stage and is very mush responsive to user requirements. It remains to be seen whether they can move from the news and presentation studio environment into areas such as drama and light entertainment.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1940

For maintaining the fortitude of both body and mind during war‐time, it is of prime importance that everyone should strive to do all that is possible to provide a…

Abstract

For maintaining the fortitude of both body and mind during war‐time, it is of prime importance that everyone should strive to do all that is possible to provide a sufficient amount of suitable food; for a well‐nourished body withstands infection and the effects of stress and strain just as a well‐built house resists the onslaughts of wind and rain.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 42 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1954

On Thursday in each week the Leader of the House of Commons announces the business which will be taken during the following week. During the past two months he has been…

Abstract

On Thursday in each week the Leader of the House of Commons announces the business which will be taken during the following week. During the past two months he has been repeatedly asked by members of the Opposition when it is proposed to have a second reading debate on the Food and Drugs Amendment Bill. Evasive answers have been given, but on July 8th Captain Crookshank intimated that the Government hoped that the second reading would take place before the summer recess, but not during the week ending on July 17th. As the Committee stage must be expected to be fairly protracted, too much hope should not be entertained that the Bill will pass through all its stages this session, as there are still other important matters requiring Parliamentary time.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 56 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1930

Recently a statement has been issued and circulated privately to interested parties by a Committee composed of the Food Manufacturers' Federation and a few Public…

Abstract

Recently a statement has been issued and circulated privately to interested parties by a Committee composed of the Food Manufacturers' Federation and a few Public Analysts, containing suggested standards for the composition of jams. The suggestions are that jams are to be divided into two grades, first quality and second quality respectively, each grade to contain generally a minimum amount of soluble solids, and fruit or fruits individually. Each grade is to include all varieties of jams, pure and mixed, with different fruit standards for each variety. At the same time particular attention is to be paid to correct labelling of each jam. The scheme is a step in the right direction, but it is open to severe criticism on several points on which many Public Analysts and local authorities will agree. The question of correct labelling will be satisfactory to all parties including the consuming public, but it is to be regretted that the suggestion is made that first quality jams may contain not only other added fruit juices, but also such substances as citric, tartaric and malic acids and pectin, without declaration. Second quality jams containing these or other substances must, on the other hand, have a label declaring the additions, therefore what possible objection can be raised to the declaration of added fruit juices, etc., in first quality jams, especially when it is claimed that any such addition is for the improvement of the consistency of the jams? The consuming public are certainly entitled to know the composition of the jam which they purchase—it is unlikely that objection would be taken to such jam if the procedure adopted was honestly and openly intimated to the purchaser, and a declaration of this nature, binding on all manufacturers, ought to be compulsory. As every housewife knows, good jams can be made without the addition of other fruit juices or pectin. Further, in the proposals issued there is no suggestion as to the amount of added substances which are to be permitted. Standards of such a nature constitute a severe and serious handicap to those manufacturers who produce what are after all the genuine and superior articles, namely, jams made by boiling fruit with sugar without additions of any kind whatever.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 32 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1957

According to the play, Julius Caesar liked to have men about him that were fat, and the conspirator with the lean and hungry look asked:

Abstract

According to the play, Julius Caesar liked to have men about him that were fat, and the conspirator with the lean and hungry look asked:

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 59 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Tom McNulty

Over the past two decades, a number of social and legislative forces have had the effect of increasing disabled peoples' attendance at institutions of higher education…

Abstract

Over the past two decades, a number of social and legislative forces have had the effect of increasing disabled peoples' attendance at institutions of higher education. Major national legislation, such as the landmark Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975, requires provision of equal access for people with disabilities to educational programs that receive federal funding. The more recent Americans with Disabilities Act was signed into law by President Bush on 26 July 1990; considered by some the “Bill of Rights” for people with disabilities, the ADA extends opportunity in the areas of employment, housing, and a number of other basic civil rights.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1957

We are reaching the tail‐end of this season's annual meetings and conferences, and a very wide field, as is usual, has been covered : political, industrial, social and…

Abstract

We are reaching the tail‐end of this season's annual meetings and conferences, and a very wide field, as is usual, has been covered : political, industrial, social and scientific. When the subjects discussed are not perhaps in one's own particular orbit of interest there is a tendency to think that certain people enjoy an orgy of verbosity, especially when they can make their own personal contribution. Certain it is that on occasion there is little or no heeding of the injunction of the Scriptures to avoid “ vain repetition ”; but even on this point it is wise to remember that the oldest of stories is always new to some listener. The type of gathering to which is given the grandiose description of “symposium”, usually includes a proportion of old material, but it serves a very useful purpose. Originally the word denoted a drinking party, but this not quite respectable past has now been safely left behind (at least as far the official agenda disclose), and in the scientific field there have been a number of symposia in recent years that have succeeded in bringing together experts in various related fields of knowledge and investigation, and in producing exchanges of information and experience, the hearing or reading of which have been to the great edification of many less proficient but equally interested.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 59 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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