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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Miriam Vandenberg, Si Fan, Nick Cooling, Keith M. Harris and James Chin

Attention on world migration has mostly focused on economic and inter-personal impacts, leaving a large gap in our understanding of how migration can affect migrants‚Ä…

Abstract

Purpose

Attention on world migration has mostly focused on economic and inter-personal impacts, leaving a large gap in our understanding of how migration can affect migrants’ health. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how the interdependent experiences of skilled migrants, as they undertake the latter part of their journey of skilled migration and resettle into their adopted homeland, can be conceptualised as a structural determinant of health.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews collected data on skilled migrants’ experiences, including health impacts, related to their migration to Tasmania, Australia. A social determinants of health (SDOH) framework and Bourdieu’s theory of practice were applied to interpret the findings.

Findings

In total, 16 skilled migrants, from several nations and occupations, provided wide-ranging accounts of social inclusion and exclusion, and frequently reported experiencing psychological stress. There were also some reports of improved mental health. The migration process shapes life’s chances and choices. Many migrants reported access to important social, economic and cultural resources, however, good health was also impeded by equally significant systemic barriers.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is small and confined to a geographically isolated location, and did not include all types of skilled migrants.

Practical implications

Countries resettling skilled migrants should modify systems to promote rather than inhibit wellbeing, e.g. government and industry partnerships to facilitate employability and enhance access to supportive information about the migration process.

Originality/value

This is the first known study to link Bourdieu’s theory to SDOH relevant to skilled migrants. This approach helped reveal the prominence of structural factors beyond the control of migrants but potentially modifiable by the host country. This study illustrates the importance of examining both positive and negative health outcomes associated with migration, and how these factors relate to theory and policy.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Bonnie McBain, Antony Drew, Carole James, Liam Phelan, Keith M Harris and Jennifer Archer

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the experiences of tertiary students learning oral presentation skills in a range of online and blended learning contexts across…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the experiences of tertiary students learning oral presentation skills in a range of online and blended learning contexts across diverse disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was designed as a ‚Äúfederation‚ÄĚ of trials of diverse online oral communications assessment tasks (OOCATs). Tasks were set in ten courses offered across all five faculties at University of Newcastle, Australia. The authors collected and analysed data about students‚Äô experiences of tasks they completed through an anonymous online survey.

Findings

Students’ engagement with the task was extremely positive but also highly varied. This diversity of student experience can inform teaching, and in doing so, can support student equity. By understanding what students think hinders or facilitates their learning, and which students have these experiences, instructors are able to make adjustments to their teaching which address both real and perceived issues. Student experience in this study highlighted five very clear themes in relation to the student experience of undertaking online oral communications tasks which all benefit from nuanced responses by the instructor: relevance; capacity; technology; time; and support.

Practical implications

Using well-designed OOCATs that diverge from more traditional written assessments can help students successfully engage with course content and develop oral communication skills. The student experience can be used to inform teaching by catering for different student learning styles and experience. Student centred approaches such as this allows instructors to reflect upon the assumptions they hold about their students and how they learn. This understanding can help inform adjustments to teaching approaches to support improved student experience of learning oral communications tasks.

Originality/value

The importance of learning oral communication skills in tertiary education is widely acknowledged internationally, however, there is limited research on how to teach these skills online in a way that is student centred. This research makes a contribution toward addressing that gap.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Melissa G. Keith, Peter D. Harms and Alexander C. Long

Despite widespread interest in the gig economy, academic research on the topic has lagged behind. The present chapter applies organizational theory and research to compose…

Abstract

Despite widespread interest in the gig economy, academic research on the topic has lagged behind. The present chapter applies organizational theory and research to compose a working model for understanding participation in the gig economy and how gig work may impact worker health and well-being. Drawing from past research this chapter defines the gig economy in all its diversity and advances a framework for understanding why individuals enter into gig economy. Next, the authors discuss how various characteristics of the gig economy and gig workers can be understood as both demands and resources that influence how gig work is likely to be experienced by the individual. To understand how these characteristics are likely to influence worker health and well-being, we draw from past research on alternative work arrangements and entrepreneurship, as well as the limited extant research on the gig economy. Finally, a research agenda is proposed to spur much needed research on the gig economy and its workers.

Details

Entrepreneurial and Small Business Stressors, Experienced Stress, and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-397-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to…

Abstract

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to uncover specific articles devoted to certain topics. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume III, in addition to the annotated list of articles as the two previous volumes, contains further features to help the reader. Each entry within has been indexed according to the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus and thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid information retrieval. Each article has its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. The first Volume of the Bibliography covered seven journals published by MCB University Press. This Volume now indexes 25 journals, indicating the greater depth, coverage and expansion of the subject areas concerned.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies ‚ÄĒ and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1980

Robert Shallow

In future, the Secretary of the Library Association will be known as the Secretary‚ÄźGeneral, it was decided at the Council meeting on November 2. Professor Keith Harris

Abstract

In future, the Secretary of the Library Association will be known as the Secretary‚ÄźGeneral, it was decided at the Council meeting on November 2. Professor Keith Harris said that if his secretary rang someone with the title of secretary, she would expect that person to take shorthand notes, and Godfrey Thompson said that a secretary was a clerical officer of fairly low standing. LAR 81 (11) November 1979.

Details

New Library World, vol. 81 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

Keith D. Harris, Harvey S. James and Aramis Harris

Agribusiness managers oftentimes find it difficult to gain practical experience in an area they have had very little practice. Habitually, they rely on their own business…

Abstract

Purpose

Agribusiness managers oftentimes find it difficult to gain practical experience in an area they have had very little practice. Habitually, they rely on their own business acumen, and tacit knowledge to navigate unfamiliar territory. What does the manager do when the problem is ill-formed, fuzzy and messy? This paper aims to integrate societal stakeholders like agribusinesses and environmentalists by using the Community of Practice (CoP) framework to help analyze and effectively use knowledge and practical experiences on problems facing the food and agriculture industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The multi-disciplinary analytical framework suggests multiple research strategies and methods. Because environmentalist-agribusiness collaborations involve complex stakeholder, relationship and social processes, case research may be the most appropriate means for initial investigations of these issues. The authors applied an exploratory approach starting with a search of a water and land stakeholder collaborations followed by the selection of specific cases, the collection of secondary case data, and a systematic qualitative content analysis. For this paper, the authors focused on 13 initiatives in agribusiness involving water and land (e.g. the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative and Global Reporting Initiative Guidelines).

Findings

The argument is that firms that use elements of the CoP are better at working through the wicked problems than firms that do not. When elements of the CoP (community, domain and practice) play a significant role in addressing the wicked problem, best practices over a pre-determined time develop. Establishing policies and standards for education and research, technology and research, facilities and operations. More specifically, they relate, in an illustrative manner, how they could quantitatively measure the results that were generated through the use of a specific practice.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has focused only on the land and water constraint aspects. A variety of other stakeholder issues warrant consideration including motivations, contingencies facilitating partnership building, changes in production and consumption and collaborative learning processes. As stakeholder objectives are met, change or diverge, the stakeholders may become less willing to broker and negotiate linkages between the firm and other domain stakeholders, and potentially affect the firm’s competitive advantage. One should also be mindful of the methods of effective engagement, which are able to incorporate and integrate the knowledge, skills, resources and perspectives from many actors are needed to undertake these problems.

Practical implications

To facilitate the discussion on water sustainability between agribusiness firms and environmental groups, it is important for agribusinesses to have some basic understanding of how much water is consumed, evaporated and/or polluted in a given amount of time. Likewise, environmental organizations will need to have a basic understanding of associated physical (freshwater shortages in the supply chain) and financial risks (increase costs or reduced revenues). Both parties need to stay open to challenges and dilemmas of the wicked problem.

Social implications

Farmers, agribusiness firms and environmentalists are the de facto and principle managers of the most productive land and water resources on earth. Their decisions will shape the surface of the planet in the coming decades. Settling on a common strategy of quality of waters resources, potential land use and land management fundamentally involves the interests of all stakeholders. By considering the divergent values, different perspectives and lived experiences of stakeholders and the inextricable link to land, it is found that managing water resources sustainably is a wicked problem.

Originality/value

The effort it takes to find and implement solutions requires the engagement of internal and external stakeholders (relationships) and access to actionable research (knowledge) to manage through the industry’s prickly challenges. For some, ecological goals are foremost, whereas for others, profit and market objectives are paramount for survival. Their relationships may be a common means for the stakeholders to reach ultimately incompatible agendas. The authors characterize water and land constraints in agriculture as a wicked problem. The wicked problems require a new corporate mindset, involving multi-discipline approach of new collaborations and processes to address them.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1947

R.S. MORTIMER

It is now forty years since there appeared H. R. Plomer's first volume Dictionary of the booksellers and printers who were at work in England, Scotland and Ireland from

Abstract

It is now forty years since there appeared H. R. Plomer's first volume Dictionary of the booksellers and printers who were at work in England, Scotland and Ireland from 1641 to 1667. This has been followed by additional Bibliographical Society publications covering similarly the years up to 1775. From the short sketches given in this series, indicating changes of imprint and type of work undertaken, scholars working with English books issued before the closing years of the eighteenth century have had great assistance in dating the undated and in determining the colour and calibre of any work before it is consulted.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2019

Ashlee Curtis, Keith R. McVilly, Andrew Day, William R. Lindsay, John L. Taylor and Todd E. Hogue

Fire setters who have an intellectual disability (ID) are often identified as posing a particular danger to the community although relatively little is known about their…

Abstract

Purpose

Fire setters who have an intellectual disability (ID) are often identified as posing a particular danger to the community although relatively little is known about their characteristics, treatment and support needs. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study describes the characteristics of 134 residents of low, medium and high security ID facilities in the UK who have either an index offence of arson, a violent index offence or a sexual index offence.

Findings

Index arson offenders who had an ID had multiple prior convictions, a history of violent offending and a high likelihood of having a comorbid mental disorder. There were many shared characteristics across the three groups.

Practical implications

The current study suggests that offenders who have ID who set fires have treatment needs that are similar to those of violent and sex offenders. It follows that fire setters who have an ID may also benefit from participating in more established offending behaviour treatment programs, such as cognitive behaviour therapy programs, developed for other types of offender.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few which has investigated the characteristics and treatment needs of persons who have an ID who set fires. In particular, it is one of the first to compare the characteristics and treatment needs for persons with ID who set fires, to those who have committed violent and sexual offences.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Keith D. Harris

This case used the interplay between individuals, firms and markets to examine how a company sustained success from its value adding activities. The theory of value…

Abstract

Theoretical basis

This case used the interplay between individuals, firms and markets to examine how a company sustained success from its value adding activities. The theory of value creation was demonstrated by the leader’s ability to configure the firm’s tangible and intangible resources to create opportunities beyond the commodity markets. Also, what matters were not just the technical processes of developing value-added products, but how the company’s culture served as a link to new products, new markets and new ventures.

Research methodology

The case was based on primary and secondary sources. The primary sources face-to-face semi-structured recorded interviews with the protagonist at the company’s headquarters. The secondary data were from the company’s website, and public information about Johnsonville Sausage LLC. Supplemental information was gathered from market research firms. No names have been disguised. The case has been classroom tested with undergraduate students in a capstone course. The author has no personal relationship with the company.

Case overview/synopsis

Kevin Ladwig, Vice President, was concerned by the expanded production of ethanol, an attractive supplement to gasoline in the USA. Because most ethanol is processed from corn, expanded production of ethanol heightened the demand for corn. Since corn is a staple feed ingredient for animals, heightened demand for corn increased the cost of Johnsonville‚Äôs raw material ‚Äď hogs. In fact, the cost of feed was Johnsonville‚Äôs major economic input in animal production from farrow to finish, accounting for up to 70 percent of the total production cost of hogs. The case introduces the nexus of food and energy markets and how the ‚ÄúJohnsonville Way‚ÄĚ was used to convert an old idea into an innovation.

Complexity academic level

This case is appropriate for undergraduate and graduate courses in business and agribusiness management. It would also be appropriate for courses using concepts in innovation and organizational culture.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

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