Search results

1 – 10 of 613
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Keith E. Gray and Deb Ghosh

Introduces the relationship marketing paradigm as a means of analysing the purchaser‐provider relationship within the NHS internal market. This focus is justified in the…

Abstract

Introduces the relationship marketing paradigm as a means of analysing the purchaser‐provider relationship within the NHS internal market. This focus is justified in the context of the limitations of orthodox economic analysis. The research evidence is based upon a national survey of all NHS trust hospitals in England. The survey consisted of key questions relating to the process of relationship building strategies employed by NHS hospital trusts. In particular, emphasis was given to non‐price competitive behaviour, i.e. the extent to which health care contracts were augmented or customised by providers. An empirical analysis is presented, identifying those factors driving such non‐price competitive behaviour, based upon a LOGIT model. The results suggest the hypotheses tested are consistent with the evidence from our survey. Finally, the model is used to make some tentative predictions regarding the future of the purchaser‐provider relationship within the reformed NHS.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Keith Gray and Mark F. Bailey

The purpose of this paper is, for English acute NHS hospitals, to investigate how they operate their governance systems in the area of secondary care contracting and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is, for English acute NHS hospitals, to investigate how they operate their governance systems in the area of secondary care contracting and identify the key determinants of relationship building within the contacting/commissioning of secondary care focusing upon non‐price competitive behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was designed and mailed to a sample of all acute NHS hospitals in England of whom 35 per cent responded. This survey was then analysed using logit techniques.

Findings

The analysis suggests that: those NHS Trusts offering volume discounts, non‐price competitive incentives or having a strong belief in performance being by “payment by results” criteria are significantly more likely to offer augmented services to secondary care purchasers over and above contractual minima; those NHS Trusts strongly believing in the importance of non‐price factors (such as contract augmentation or quality) in the contracting process are more likely to offer customisation of generic services; and those NHS Trusts using cost‐sharing agreements to realign contracts when negotiating contracts or who strongly believe in the importance of service augmentation in strengthening relationships, or that increased hospital efficiency is the most important aspect of recent NHS reform are more likely to utilise default measures to help realign contracts.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap in the area of non‐price competition in English NHS acute secondary care contracting.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Teresa L. Scheid

In this chapter, I develop an analysis of the institutional logics which have shaped the organizational field of public sector mental health and which provide a framework…

Abstract

Purpose

In this chapter, I develop an analysis of the institutional logics which have shaped the organizational field of public sector mental health and which provide a framework for understanding the complexities facing policy makers, providers, researchers, and community mental health advocates.

Approach

I first assess the current state of public sector mental health care. I then describe institutional theory, which focuses our attention on the wider social values and priorities (i.e., institutional logics) which shape mental health care. In the current post-deinstitutionalization era, there are three competing institutional logics: recovery and community integration, cost containment and commodification, and increased social control over those with severe mental disorders. Each of these logics, and the conflict between them, is explicated and analyzed. I then develop a theoretical framework for understanding how conflicting institutional logics are resolved. In the concluding section of this chapter, I offer some guidance to both researchers and advocates seeking meaningful system level reform.

Research implications

Researchers studying mental health policy need to understand how competing institutional logics work to shape the political climate, economic priorities, and types of services available.

Social implications

Advocacy is critical for meaningful reform, and a fourth institutional logic – that of social justice – needs to be developed by which to evaluate policy reforms and service offerings.

Details

50 Years After Deinstitutionalization: Mental Illness in Contemporary Communities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-403-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2007

Mattias Ganslandt and Keith E. Maskus

The existence of parallel imports (PI) raises a number of interesting policy and strategic questions, which are the subject of this survey article. For example, parallel…

Abstract

The existence of parallel imports (PI) raises a number of interesting policy and strategic questions, which are the subject of this survey article. For example, parallel trade is essentially arbitrage within policy-integrated markets of IPR-protected goods, which may have different prices across countries. Thus, we analyze fully two types of price differences that give rise to such arbitrage. First is simple retail-level trade in horizontal markets because consumer prices may differ. Second is the deeper, and more strategic, issue of vertical pricing within the common distribution organization of an original manufacturer selling its goods through wholesale distributors in different markets. This vertical price control problem presents the IPR-holding firm a menu of strategic choices regarding how to compete with PI. Another strategic question is how the existence of PI might affect incentives of IPR holders to invest in research and development (R&D). The global research-based pharmaceutical firms, for example, strongly oppose any relaxation of restrictions against PI of drugs into the United States, arguing that the potential reduction in profits would diminish their ability to innovate. There is a close linkage here with price controls for medicines, which are a key component of national health policies but can give rise to arbitrage through PI. We also discuss the complex economic relationships between PI and other forms of competition policy, or attempts to limit the abuse of market power offered by patents and copyrights. Finally, we review the emerging literature on how policies governing PI may affect international trade agreements.

Details

Intellectual Property, Growth and Trade
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-539-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Keith James Kelley and Yannick Thams

In this chapter, we explore the multilevel nature of reputation from a shared value perspective. Building on a large body of literature surrounding corporate reputation…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore the multilevel nature of reputation from a shared value perspective. Building on a large body of literature surrounding corporate reputation, we discuss how the creation of reputational value at the firm level may also lead to value shared by the industries and countries in which a firm operates, and vice versa. In examining the recursive and dynamic relationships, strategic implications emerge with regard to managing reputations globally. We argue that the value of reputation is determined by the ability to meet the expectations of stakeholders with respect to what they as an audience perceive as important. Stakeholders’ expectations and perceptions of what is valuable fluctuate across different markets and the more heterogeneous the markets in which a firm diversifies internationally, the more difficult it will be to manage all these expectations. By building on our understanding of firm, industry, and country reputation, and the recursive relationships between them, we contend that creating shared value (CSV), as part of the global reputation management process (GRM), is likely to be easier when there is contextual similarity and limited product diversification. Building on previous frameworks, and employing signaling theory, we create a simplified model of GRM that highlights CSV in the form of multilevel reputation. Distinctions are drawn between being efficient and effective as part of the GRM process and a corresponding typology is created. The chapter concludes with a discussion of strategic implications, alongside a few recommendations, and possible directions for future research.

Details

Global Aspects of Reputation and Strategic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-314-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Citizen Responsive Government
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-029-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1947

R.S. MORTIMER

It is now forty years since there appeared H. R. Plomer's first volume Dictionary of the booksellers and printers who were at work in England, Scotland and Ireland from

Abstract

It is now forty years since there appeared H. R. Plomer's first volume Dictionary of the booksellers and printers who were at work in England, Scotland and Ireland from 1641 to 1667. This has been followed by additional Bibliographical Society publications covering similarly the years up to 1775. From the short sketches given in this series, indicating changes of imprint and type of work undertaken, scholars working with English books issued before the closing years of the eighteenth century have had great assistance in dating the undated and in determining the colour and calibre of any work before it is consulted.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Roger L. Burritt

The purpose of this paper is to provide comment on the contribution of the Environmental performance accountability special issue of Accounting, Auditing & Accountability

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide comment on the contribution of the Environmental performance accountability special issue of Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal published in 1997 towards the innovation through a personal reflection developed from the perceived need to move academics and practitioners into the same space on environmental improvement by organisations. In addition, the paper will offer future directions for environmental performance accountability research, including the potential for tools such as integrated reporting, the need for theoretical pragmatism and importance of a transdisciplinary approach to research.

Design/methodology/approach

The diegetic method used for this article allowed for the provision of a narrative about actions, characters and events of interest to an audience. This method facilitated the intersection between the biographical and the historical content and context, and a hypodiegesis provided the ability for an embedded story within the larger history. The approach allowed for a hypodiegetic as the story within the story of developing the relationships between academic accountants and practitioners.

Findings

Contained in the special issue is a set of articles marking the extremes of academic and practitioner perspectives on what is broadly termed environmental performance and accountability. Review of the content of the special issue reveals that the bias is towards academic rather than practitioner appreciation. Review of the context providing the setting for the special issue shows the need for publishers to engage in the social media mechanisms needed to commence dialogue and convey the messages of academics to practitioners.

Research limitations/implications

Subjective assessment is overtly recognized rather than subsumed in the research methods adopted.

Practical implications

The embedding of articles in special issues within a broader communications portfolio for practitioner understanding is suggested.

Originality/value

The nature of the personal reflection means that thoughts recorded are novel and unique.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Keith G. Jeffery

The importance of grey literature is becoming increasingly recognised. For many organisations it encapsulates the knowledge and know‐how and thus is a vital business…

Abstract

The importance of grey literature is becoming increasingly recognised. For many organisations it encapsulates the knowledge and know‐how and thus is a vital business asset. It has similar importance in quality of life aspects – healthcare, environment and culture. Grey literature in a R&D (research and development) environment represents the cutting edge of this knowledge and so its management is of utmost importance. Partly based on involvement in defining the datamodels for R&D information interchange across Europe, the author defines a content metadata datamodel for grey literature which is more expressive and has more flexibility than any previous proposal and which integrates seamlessly with the CERIF2000 definition which will soon replace the CERIF1991 European Union Recommendation to Member States on Exchange of R&D Information. The content metadata datamodel offers significant advantages over Dublin Core yet can generate Dublin Core if required.

Details

International Journal on Grey Literature, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-6189

Keywords

1 – 10 of 613