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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Nushrat Khan, Mike Thelwall and Kayvan Kousha

The purpose of this study is to explore current practices, challenges and technological needs of different data repositories.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore current practices, challenges and technological needs of different data repositories.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was designed for data repository managers, and contact information from the re3data, a data repository registry, was collected to disseminate the survey.

Findings

In total, 189 responses were received, including 47% discipline specific and 34% institutional data repositories. A total of 71% of the repositories reporting their software used bespoke technical frameworks, with DSpace, EPrint and Dataverse being commonly used by institutional repositories. Of repository managers, 32% reported tracking secondary data reuse while 50% would like to. Among data reuse metrics, citation counts were considered extremely important by the majority, followed by links to the data from other websites and download counts. Despite their perceived usefulness, repository managers struggle to track dataset citations. Most repository managers support dataset and metadata quality checks via librarians, subject specialists or information professionals. A lack of engagement from users and a lack of human resources are the top two challenges, and outreach is the most common motivator mentioned by repositories across all groups. Ensuring findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR) data (49%), providing user support for research (36%) and developing best practices (29%) are the top three priorities for repository managers. The main recommendations for future repository systems are as follows: integration and interoperability between data and systems (30%), better research data management (RDM) tools (19%), tools that allow computation without downloading datasets (16%) and automated systems (16%).

Originality/value

This study identifies the current challenges and needs for improving data repository functionalities and user experiences.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/OIR-04-2021-0204

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2017

Mike Thelwall and Kayvan Kousha

Data sharing is widely thought to help research quality and efficiency. Data sharing mandates are increasingly being adopted by journals and the purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Data sharing is widely thought to help research quality and efficiency. Data sharing mandates are increasingly being adopted by journals and the purpose of this paper is to assess whether they work.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines two evolutionary biology journals, Evolution and Heredity, that have data sharing mandates and make extensive use of Dryad. It uses a quantitative analysis of presence in Dryad, downloads and citations.

Findings

Within both journals, data sharing seems to be complete, showing that the mandates work on a technical level. Low correlations (0.15-0.18) between data downloads and article citation counts for articles published in 2012 within these journals indicate a weak relationship between data sharing and research impact. An average of 40-55 data downloads per article after a few years suggests that some use is found for shared life sciences data.

Research limitations/implications

The value of shared data uses is unclear.

Practical implications

Data sharing mandates should be encouraged as an effective strategy.

Originality/value

This is the first analysis of the effectiveness of data sharing mandates.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Kayvan Kousha

Recently, the new application of DVD technology in multimedia reference sources provides opportunities to integrate a large amount of various media, as well as many kinds…

Abstract

Recently, the new application of DVD technology in multimedia reference sources provides opportunities to integrate a large amount of various media, as well as many kinds of reference sources, on a single disc. This paper provides an overview of the recent trends towards publishing DVD multimedia reference sources and discusses the advantages of DVD‐ROMs and the gigabyte storage potential of the technology for publishing multimeia reference sources.

Details

Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2015

Mike Thelwall, Kayvan Kousha, Adam Dinsmore and Kevin Dolby

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential of altmetric and webometric indicators to aid with funding agencies’ evaluations of their funding schemes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential of altmetric and webometric indicators to aid with funding agencies’ evaluations of their funding schemes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses a range of altmetric and webometric indicators in terms of suitability for funding scheme evaluations, compares them to traditional indicators and reports some statistics derived from a pilot study with Wellcome Trust-associated publications.

Findings

Some alternative indicators have advantages to usefully complement scientometric data by reflecting a different type of impact or through being available before citation data.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical part of the results is based on a single case study and does not give statistical evidence for the added value of any of the indicators.

Practical implications

A few selected alternative indicators can be used by funding agencies as part of their funding scheme evaluations if they are processed in ways that enable comparisons between data sets. Their evidence value is only weak, however.

Originality/value

This is the first analysis of altmetrics or webometrics from a funding scheme evaluation perspective.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 68 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2009

Kayvan Kousha

More knowledge about open access (OA) scholarly publishing on the web would be helpful for citation data mining and the development of web‐based citation indexes. Hence…

Abstract

Purpose

More knowledge about open access (OA) scholarly publishing on the web would be helpful for citation data mining and the development of web‐based citation indexes. Hence, the main purpose of this study is to identify common characteristics of open access publishing, which may therefore enable us to measure different aspects of e‐research on the web.

Design/methodology/approach

In the current study, five characteristics of 545 OA citing sources targeting OA research articles in four science and four social science disciplines were manually identified, including file format, hyperlinking, internet domain, language and publication year.

Findings

About 60 per cent of the OA citing sources targeting research papers were in PDF format, 30 per cent were from academic domains ending in edu and ac and 70 per cent of the citations were not hyperlinked. Moreover, 16 per cent of the OA citing sources targeting studied papers in the eight selected disciplines were in non‐English languages. Additional analyses revealed significant disciplinary differences in some studied characteristics across science and the social sciences.

Originality/value

The OA web citation network was dominated by PDF format files and non‐hyperlinked citations. This knowledge of characteristics shaping the OA citation network gives a better understanding about their potential uses for open access scholarly research.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 61 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Kayvan Kousha and Mahshid Abdoli

The main purpose of this study is to assess the citation advantage for self‐archived Open Access (OA) agriculture research against its non‐OA counterparts.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to assess the citation advantage for self‐archived Open Access (OA) agriculture research against its non‐OA counterparts.

Design/methodology/approach

At the article level, the paper compared the citation counts of self‐archived research with non‐OA articles based upon a sample of 400 research articles from ISI‐indexed (ISI, Institute for Scientific Information) agriculture journals in 2005. At the journal level the paper compared impact factors (IFs) of OA against non‐OA agriculture journals from 2005 to 2007 as reported by the ISI Journal Citation Reports. The paper also sought evidence of citation impact based on a random sample of 100 OA and 100 non‐OA publications from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations in 2005. It used both ISI and Scopus databases for citation counting and also Google and Google Scholar for locating the self‐archived articles published in the non‐OA journals.

Findings

The results showed that there is an obvious citation advantage for self‐archived agriculture articles as compared to non‐OA articles. Out of a random sample of 400 articles published in non‐OA agriculture journals, about 14 per cent were OA and had a median citation count of four whereas the median for non‐OA articles was two. However, at the journal level the average IF for OA agriculture journals from 2005 to 2007 was 0.29, considerably lower than the average IF for non‐OA journals (0.65). Finally it found that FAO publications which were freely accessible online tended to attract more citations than non‐OA publications in the same year and had a mean citation count of 1.73 whereas the mean for non‐OA publications was 0.28.

Originality/value

Self‐archived agriculture research articles tended to attract higher citations than their non‐OA counterparts. This knowledge of the citation impact of OA agricultural research gives a better understanding about the potential effect of self‐archiving on the citation impact.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2012

Mike Thelwall, Kayvan Kousha, Katrin Weller and Cornelius Puschmann

Purpose – The web provides scholars with mechanisms to publish new types of outputs, including videos. Little is known about which scholarly videos are successful…

Abstract

Purpose – The web provides scholars with mechanisms to publish new types of outputs, including videos. Little is known about which scholarly videos are successful, however, and whether their impact can be measured to give appropriate credit to their creators. This article examines online academic videos to discover which types are popular and whether view counts could be used to judge their value.

Methodology/approach – The study uses a content analysis of YouTube videos tweeted by academics: one random sample and one popular sample.

Findings – The results show that the most popular videos produced by identifiable academics are those aimed at a general audience and which are edited rather than having a simple format. It seems that the audience for typical academic videos is so small that video production in most cases cannot be justified in terms of viewer numbers alone.

Practical implications – For the typical scholar, videos should be produced for niche audiences to support other activities rather than as an end in themselves. For dissemination videos, in contrast, view counts can be used as a good indicator of failure or popularity, although translating popularity into impact is not straightforward.

Details

Social Information Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-833-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Mike Thelwall and Kayvan Kousha

A number of subject-orientated and general websites have emerged to host academic resources. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the uptake of such services in order…

Abstract

Purpose

A number of subject-orientated and general websites have emerged to host academic resources. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the uptake of such services in order to decide which depositing strategies are effective and should be encouraged.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper evaluates the views and shares of resources in the generic repository Figshare by subject category and resource type.

Findings

Figshare use and common resource types vary substantially by subject category but resources can be highly viewed even in subjects with few members. More active subject areas do not tend to have more viewed or shared resources.

Research limitations/implications

The view counts and share counts analysed may reflect author accesses or may be spammed.

Practical implications

Limited uptake of Figshare within a subject area should not be a barrier to its use. Several highly successful innovative uses for Figshare show that it can reach beyond a purely academic audience.

Originality/value

This is the first analysis of the uptake and use of a generic academic resource sharing repository.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Xuemei Li, Mike Thelwall and Kayvan Kousha

The four major Subject Repositories (SRs), arXiv, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Social Science Research Network (SSRN) and PubMed Central (PMC), are all important…

Abstract

Purpose

The four major Subject Repositories (SRs), arXiv, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Social Science Research Network (SSRN) and PubMed Central (PMC), are all important within their disciplines but no previous study has systematically compared how often they are cited in academic publications. In response, the purpose of this paper is to report an analysis of citations to SRs from Scopus publications, 2000-2013.

Design/methodology/approach

Scopus searches were used to count the number of documents citing the four SRs in each year. A random sample of 384 documents citing the four SRs was then visited to investigate the nature of the citations.

Findings

Each SR was most cited within its own subject area but attracted substantial citations from other subject areas, suggesting that they are open to interdisciplinary uses. The proportion of documents citing each SR is continuing to increase rapidly, and the SRs all seem to attract substantial numbers of citations from more than one discipline.

Research limitations/implications

Scopus does not cover all publications, and most citations to documents found in the four SRs presumably cite the published version, when one exists, rather than the repository version.

Practical implications

SRs are continuing to grow and do not seem to be threatened by institutional repositories and so research managers should encourage their continued use within their core disciplines, including for research that aims at an audience in other disciplines.

Originality/value

This is the first simultaneous analysis of Scopus citations to the four most popular SRs.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 67 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Amalia Más-Bleda, Mike Thelwall, Kayvan Kousha and Isidro F. Aguillo

This study aims to explore the link creating behaviour of European highly cited scientists based upon their online lists of publications and their institutional personal…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the link creating behaviour of European highly cited scientists based upon their online lists of publications and their institutional personal websites.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,525 highly cited scientists working at European institutions were first identified. Outlinks from their online lists of publications and their personal websites pointing to a pre-defined collection of popular academic websites and file types were then gathered by a personal web crawler.

Findings

Perhaps surprisingly, a larger proportion of social scientists provided at least one outlink compared to the other disciplines investigated. By far the most linked-to file type was PDF and the most linked-to type of target website was scholarly databases, especially the Digital Object Identifier website. Health science and life science researchers mainly linked to scholarly databases, while scientists from engineering, hard sciences and social sciences linked to a wider range of target websites. Both book sites and social network sites were rarely linked to, especially the former. Hence, whilst successful researchers frequently use the Web to point to online copies of their articles, there are major disciplinary and other differences in how they do this.

Originality/value

This is the first study to analyse the outlinking patterns of highly cited researchers' institutional web presences in order to identify which web resources they use to provide access to their publications.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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