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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Kay E. Sanders, Monica Molgaard and Mari Shigemasa

This study aims to examine the interplay between culturally relevant materials, child racial ethnic classroom composition and positive emotional climate in regard to high…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the interplay between culturally relevant materials, child racial ethnic classroom composition and positive emotional climate in regard to high levels of peer play in low-income, urban preschools located in African-American and Mexican immigrant/Mexican-American communities in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample includes state or city subsidized child care programs in the USA which were traditionally African-American programs that experienced an influx of Latino immigrant enrollment. Instruments included structured observations of classroom peer play and cultural artifacts. Hierarchical multiple regression was run to determine whether cultural artifacts and child ethnic composition within classrooms contributed to the prediction of high-peer play over positive emotional climate alone.

Findings

The final model indicates that cultural artifacts reflective of African-American culture positively predict high levels of peer play, while Mexican-American cultural items are negatively predictive. In classrooms with a majority African-American population, predicted high-peer play is 7.994 greater than that predicted for majority of Latino classrooms.

Research limitations/implications

Positive emotional climate in these programs was not very high, and it is not clear whether the findings discussed in this report would hold in contexts that exhibit much higher levels of positive emotional climate. It is also not clear that the inclusion of cultural artifacts in contexts in which African-American children are the minority or in racial-ethnically heterogeneous classrooms would lead to the same findings.

Practical implications

ECE classroom should make specific choices as to what culturally relevant materials to include in early childhood classrooms. Teachers of young children of color must facilitate children’s engagement with these materials by ensuring that they are representative of the children’s cultural experiences and by supporting children’s engagement with peers through the formation of emotionally positive classroom climates.

Social implications

This study points to interesting relationships between what teachers have in classrooms and children’s engagement with each other within those contexts. The findings from this study also exemplify that a one-size-fits-all approach toward childhood development may be counterproductive. Children bring with them ethnic and cultural heritages, which when combined with the preschool culture, create unique experiences for them that should not be ignored or controlled for analysis, but rather, understood.

Originality/value

This study provides a unique analysis of seldom considered contexts by examining the use of culturally relevant materials in urban, early childhood contexts. Teachers of young children have been found to consider a focus on race and ethnicity as unnecessary or to engage in a colorblind approach with young children. This study demonstrates how paying careful consideration to the cultural environment in classrooms also supports children’s exploration and play quality.

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Book part
Publication date: 3 October 2015

Flora Farago, Kay Sanders and Larissa Gaias

This chapter draws on developmental intergroup theory, parental ethnic-racial socialization literature, anti-bias curricula, and prejudice intervention studies to address…

Abstract

This chapter draws on developmental intergroup theory, parental ethnic-racial socialization literature, anti-bias curricula, and prejudice intervention studies to address the appropriateness of discussing race and racism in early childhood settings. Existing literature about teacher discussions surrounding race and racism is reviewed, best practices are shared, and the need for more research in this area is highlighted. The construct of parental ethnic-racial socialization is mapped onto early childhood anti-bias classroom practices. The chapter also outlines racial ideologies of teachers, specifically anti-bias and colorblind attitudes, and discusses how these ideologies may manifest in classroom practices surrounding race and racism. Colorblind ideology is problematized and dissected to show that colorblind practices may harm children. Young children’s interpretations of race and racism, in light of children’s cognitive developmental level, are discussed. Additionally, findings from racial prejudice intervention studies are applied to teaching. Early literacy practices surrounding race and racism are outlined with practical suggestions for teachers and teacher educators. Moreover, implications of teacher practices surrounding race and racism for children’s development, professional development, and teacher education are discussed.

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Book part
Publication date: 3 October 2015

Abstract

Details

Discussions on Sensitive Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-293-1

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Book part
Publication date: 3 October 2015

Abstract

Details

Discussions on Sensitive Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-293-1

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Hye Jeong Kim, Susan Pederson and Moira Baldwin

The purpose of this paper is to examine students’ experiences with a case‐enhanced e‐learning environment in a higher‐education institute.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine students’ experiences with a case‐enhanced e‐learning environment in a higher‐education institute.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 67 graduate students volunteered to take part in this experiment. The participants were assigned to treatment groups using tutorial with case‐based learning (CBL) module or comparison groups using tutorial only. They completed a background survey, a technological proficiency survey, a pre‐ and post‐knowledge test, and a learner perception survey of the e‐learning environment.

Findings

The present study found a significant increase in the level of domain knowledge in both a tutorial‐only group and a tutorial with CBL module group. The tutorial with CBL group scored significantly higher on learners’ perceptions of the e‐learning environment in terms of ease of use, satisfaction, and usefulness. In addition, the results of the use of a CBL module based on individual differences such as gender, degree level, and information technology self‐efficacy are discussed.

Practical implications

Designing an e‐learning environment for adult learners needs to consider their needs and motives. Adult learners who have specific learning goals tend to be more satisfied with an interactive and supportive e‐learning environment using real cases, rather than sequential and less flexible e‐learning only.

Originality/value

This paper describes an e‐learning system including the case module to enhance learner's satisfaction and knowledge. The paper contributes to the literature on CBL in adult learning and higher education context and in the design of a practical learning environment for user satisfaction.

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2018

Fiona M. Kay

Building on relational inequality theory, this paper incorporates social capital as a device to trace the flow of resources through relationships originating within and…

Abstract

Building on relational inequality theory, this paper incorporates social capital as a device to trace the flow of resources through relationships originating within and beyond organizations. I draw on a survey of over 1,700 lawyers to evaluate key dynamics of social capital that shape earnings: bridging and bonding, reciprocity exchanges and sponsorship, and boundary maintenance. The findings show social capital lends a lift to law graduates through bridges to professional careers and sponsorship following job entry. Racial minorities, however, suffer a shortfall of personal networks to facilitate job searches, and once having secured jobs, minorities experience social closure practices by clients and colleagues that disadvantage them in their professional work. A sizeable earnings gap remains between racial minority and white lawyers after controlling for human and social capitals, social closure practices, and organizational context. This earnings gap is particularly large among racial minorities with more years of experience and those working in large law firms. The findings demonstrate the importance of identifying the interrelations that connect social network and organizational context to impact social inequality.

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Elizabeth H. Gorman and Fiona M. Kay

In elite professional firms, minorities are actively recruited but struggle to move upward. The authors argue that initiatives aimed at general skill development can have…

Abstract

In elite professional firms, minorities are actively recruited but struggle to move upward. The authors argue that initiatives aimed at general skill development can have unintended consequences for firm diversity. Specifically, the authors contend that approaches that win partner support through motivational significance and interpretive clarity provide a more effective avenue to skill development for minorities, who have less access than White peers to informal developmental opportunities. The authors also argue that a longer “partnership track,” which imposes a time limit on skill development, will benefit minority professionals. Using data on 601 offices of large US law firms in 1996 and 2005, the authors investigate the effects of five developmental initiatives and partnership track length on the representation of African-Americans, Latinxs, and Asian-Americans among partners. Observed effects are consistent with expectations, but patterns vary across racial-ethnic groups.

Details

Professional Work: Knowledge, Power and Social Inequalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-210-9

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Ian Stott, David Sanders and Giles Tewkesbury

Describes a new reliable low‐cost ultrasonic ranging system to assist in steering a powered wheelchair. Detection algorithms have been created and implemented on a micro…

Abstract

Describes a new reliable low‐cost ultrasonic ranging system to assist in steering a powered wheelchair. Detection algorithms have been created and implemented on a micro controller based stand‐alone system suitable for a tele‐operated vehicle. The detection uses the gradient of the echo envelope and is resistant to noise and inconsistencies in the detection circuitry. The sensor array was considered as separate sensors, working independently so the system could quickly gather separate sets of range information. These sets were overlaid on to a 2D grid array. The new system is cheaper and simpler than available systems for powered wheelchairs.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2010

Elizabeth H. Gorman and Fiona M. Kay

Although law schools have seen rising representation of diverse racial and ethnic groups among students, minorities continue to represent disproportionately small…

Abstract

Although law schools have seen rising representation of diverse racial and ethnic groups among students, minorities continue to represent disproportionately small percentages of lawyers within large corporate law firms. Prior research on the nature and causes of minority underrepresentation in such firms has been sparse. In this paper, we use data on a national sample of more than 1,300 law firm offices to examine variation across large U.S. law firms in the representation of African-Americans, Hispanics, and Asian-Americans. Overall, minorities are better represented in offices located in Western states and in major metropolitan areas; offices that are larger and affiliated with larger firms; offices of firms with higher revenues and profits per partner; offices with greater associate–partner leverage; and branch offices rather than principal offices. They are equally distributed between offices with single-tier and two-tier partnerships. Distinct patterns emerge, however, when the three groups are considered separately and when hierarchical rank within firms is taken into account.

Details

Special Issue Law Firms, Legal Culture, and Legal Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-357-7

Abstract

Details

Legal Professions: Work, Structure and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-800-2

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