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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Heba Makram, Paul Sparrow and Kay Greasley

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of strategic actors in multinational organisations and to contribute to our understanding of how multinational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of strategic actors in multinational organisations and to contribute to our understanding of how multinational companies articulate and define talent management and how – or what – they perceive its value to be.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an empirical research study in which data were collected through 50 in-depth interviews across five multinational companies, conducted at a regional level across ten countries. Participants in the study were strategic actors representing two groups of managers/leaders (HR and talent management system designers and business leaders who are directly involved in the implementation of talent management).

Findings

The absence of a formal talent management definition led to the emergence of different views and interpretations of what it is. It was viewed as a bundle, or set, of management ideologies manifested in all HR-related practices across four key areas: hiring the right talent, performance management, succession planning and development and retention. Performance management acted as the cornerstone. Talent management strategies displayed little participation for both system designers and implementers and distinct patterns of mystification, technologization and concretisation. The language of value was uncommonly used but provoked different ways of thinking about the role and meaning of talent management.

Practical implications

The strategic actors in the talent system continue to see talent management in narrow functional and HR process terms. However, by bundling these HR functions and processes together, it is evident that they can be encouraged to recast their activity in a broader strategic narrative. Borrowing the notions and theories of value and value creation, and investigating talent management through this lens, should help to surface interesting insights into how talent management might be defined in practice, and how the language of value may in future be used to understand what talent management really is.

Originality/value

The global study underpinning this paper attempts to deconstruct the understanding that strategic actors have about talent management from an empirical base. It contributes to the conceptual development of the talent management discourse by revealing the logics being pursued and address the definitional problem currently evidenced in the literature. It also provides direction for future research.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Andrew Greasley, David Bennett and Kay Greasley

This paper describes a project aimed at assessing the experience of a virtual learning environment (VLE) among students studying courses in operations management. The…

Abstract

This paper describes a project aimed at assessing the experience of a virtual learning environment (VLE) among students studying courses in operations management. The project was supported by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) under its Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund (TQEF). The main aim of the project was through the use of a questionnaire to establish the student experience of using a VLE through an examination of the learning and technical features which they encountered. The study also examines the approaches to learning adopted by the students, through the inclusion of a shortened version of the approaches and study skills inventory for students (ASSIST) which the students were asked to complete.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Kay Greasley, Paul J. Watson and Shilpa Patel

This article aims to explore public‐public partnership issues arising when public sector organisations work together in order to deliver a new government sponsored initiative.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore public‐public partnership issues arising when public sector organisations work together in order to deliver a new government sponsored initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted for this study, employing in‐depth interviews across four UK case study sites. The rich qualitative data gathered from these interviews is analysed utilising a thematic framework.

Findings

The findings indicate that most of the participants did not feel that they were involved in a partnership and had little or no contact with their partner. The key role of inter‐personal relationships amongst individual members is emphasised.

Research limitations/implications

The findings presented represent the pilot sites utilised in a government sponsored initiative. As future public‐public partnerships develop, further research should be undertaken to explore this phenomenon and establish the generalisability of these findings.

Practical implications

The study indicates that while there are clear benefits of partnership working, achieving successful collaboration is not straightforward. Improvements need to be made to develop partnerships using both formal and informal communication methods.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the importance of the relationships between, and perceptions of, personnel at an individual level in the success of public‐public partnerships.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Kay Greasley, Alan Bryman, Andrew Dainty, Andrew Price, Nicola Naismith and Robby Soetanto

The purpose of this article is to examine the various meanings of empowerment for employees from their own perspective, the psychological dimension of empowerment and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the various meanings of empowerment for employees from their own perspective, the psychological dimension of empowerment and whether employees want to be empowered.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to understand how employees feel about empowerment, it is necessary to ask them directly so that one can understand their perceptions. A qualitative approach is adopted, employing 45 semi‐structured, in‐depth interviews with employees. The aim of the interviews is to provide an insight into the meanings of empowerment for these employees.

Findings

The findings indicate that the employees do not recognise the term “empowerment” nor do they reference the term “power” in relation to themselves. However, they are able to relate to associated concepts, notably “personal responsibility” and “control over their work”. Empowerment for the employees was found to operate as a continuum, as the extent to which employees seek empowerment varies considerably. The innate feelings that employees have with regard to empowerment enable an insightful understanding of what empowerment means and the employee response to it.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on employees from one particular industrial sector. The research would benefit from exploration in alternative sectors.

Originality/value

The study examines the various meanings of empowerment for employees from their own perspective. Furthermore, it explores whether employees want to be empowered.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Kay Greasley, Alan Bryman, Andrew Dainty, Andrew Price, Robby Soetanto and Nicola King

This study aims to examine how empowerment is perceived by individuals employed on construction projects. In contrast with previous research which has predominantly been…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how empowerment is perceived by individuals employed on construction projects. In contrast with previous research which has predominantly been conducted from a management perspective, this paper deals with employee perceptions of empowerment.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted for this study employing in‐depth interviews on four major construction projects.

Findings

The findings from the study indicate that there can be a gap between the employee experience and the management rhetoric. Health and Safety issues were often cited by the employees as a major barrier to empowerment. The strict Health and Safety regulations under which construction employees operate limit their freedom to influence the work that they undertake. A further factor that was found to have a strong influence on the diffusion of empowerment was the role of the employees’ immediate supervisor.

Research limitations/implications

The data are based on case studies that illuminate our understanding of empowerment in relation to construction projects. This area of research would benefit from alternative research approaches that could establish the generalizability of the findings reported.

Originality/value

This article explores the notion that, as empowerment is a perception, management cannot easily regulate employees’ empowerment. This emphasises the importance of exploring employee perspectives when examining employee empowerment and its impact on workplace relations.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Kay Greasley, Paul Edwards, Denise Baker‐McClearn and Jeremy Dale

Many studies look at the effects of human resource (HR) initiatives. Yet very few consider why organisations adopt them in the first place. Health and wellbeing…

Abstract

Purpose

Many studies look at the effects of human resource (HR) initiatives. Yet very few consider why organisations adopt them in the first place. Health and wellbeing interventions offer a critical case because they offer apparent benefits for all. Assessing the process of engagement reveals variations in managerial commitment, which has implications for studies of “effects”. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study offered a free health intervention to organisations; this was separate from the research study, which aimed to assess the effects. A total of 86 organisations were approached, of which 53 indicated some interest in involvement. After further withdrawals and selection against criteria of size and sector, nine remained. The paper assesses the degree of engagement with the study, looking in detail at three organisations. The methods utilised included structured telephone interviews, qualitative interviews and observation.

Findings

The organisations underwent a rigorous selection procedure to ensure their full commitment to the study. On this basis it is expected that the participating organisations would be highly engaged. However, it became clear that there were considerable variations in how they engaged. This reflected the favourability of the organisational context, but also the enthusiasm and commitment of key actors.

Originality/value

Engaged organisations were a highly self‐selected group. Studies of effects of interventions may thus be systematically biased. The interventions studies here were also shaped by how they were put into practice; they were not fixed things whose effects could be understood independently of their implementation. The study was also able to make predictions of the subsequent effects of the interventions based on the process of implementation. The results of a follow‐up study to test these predictions will be reported in a further paper.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Kay Greasley, Paul Watson and Shilpa Patel

This paper aims to examine the impact of organisational change on public sector employees utilising the implementation of the UK Government's “Back to work” programme…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of organisational change on public sector employees utilising the implementation of the UK Government's “Back to work” programme (BTW) as a case study example. The paper seeks to explore the employee response to the changes they experience as a result of this new initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted for this study, employing in‐depth interviews across the UK. The interview strategy sought to focus on the individual experiences and perceptions of those involved in the operation of the programme.

Findings

The findings highlight how the interviewees face organisational change as part of their everyday life, with the pace of change increasing and becoming more radical. Many of these organisational changes are related to the introduction of new initiatives that require amendments to existing working practices. It was found that a lack of permanency and constant switching of initiatives, imposed by central government, could result in cynical attitudes towards a new initiative as interviewees await the newer, bigger and brighter programme.

Practical implications

The study indicates that when a new initiative is introduced this involves change which impacts on employees and there needs to be a management response to this challenge to ensure that initiatives are successful. Notably there needs to be a move from quick fix, early‐win outcomes as new programmes take time and effort.

Originality/value

The paper presents empirical evidence of the impact of change as a result of a new initiative involving public sector employees. It demonstrates how the political context driving new initiatives like the BTW programme affects employees on the “shopfloor” and emphasises the need for management to respond to this challenge.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Fiona Lettice and Martin McCracken

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2017

Vlad Vaiman, David G. Collings and Hugh Scullion

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Fiona Lettice and Martin McCracken

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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