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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Katy King

Provides a brief account of the BLDSC during 1989/90. Notes thatnew technology plays an increasingly important role for them. Commentson their work in development of…

Abstract

Provides a brief account of the BLDSC during 1989/90. Notes that new technology plays an increasingly important role for them. Comments on their work in development of costing areas and the International Cost Model. Makes reference to high‐speed polythene packaging for photocopies.

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Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Abstract

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Research in Times of Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-797-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1982

Clive Bingley, Allan Bunch and Edwin Fleming

STORIES circulating in July that copies of the Touche Ross report into the affairs of the Library Association—distribution of which was initially restricted to members of…

Abstract

STORIES circulating in July that copies of the Touche Ross report into the affairs of the Library Association—distribution of which was initially restricted to members of LA Council—were to be had in the Charing Cross Road at thirty quid a go proved unfounded when I spent a morning poking about the bookshops there. True, one LA councillor told me that for a fiver he would wave his copy briefly in front of my face so that I could claim to have ‘seen’ it, but I declined on the ground that an aesthetic visual experience would butter no parsnips in this column.

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New Library World, vol. 83 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Graham P. Cornish

Interlending & Document Supply has had a chequered history in terms of its title but almost unparalleled stability from an editorial point of view. Various political and…

Abstract

Interlending & Document Supply has had a chequered history in terms of its title but almost unparalleled stability from an editorial point of view. Various political and organisational changes within the British Library have caused changes in the journal and transfer to a commercial publisher had a major impact, but its place as the leading international journal in the field of document supply remains unchallenged.

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Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Katy Sunter

Details the experience of King′s Lynn and West Norfolk Council ininstalling closed‐circuit television cameras in its town‐centre carparks. Figures show that not only has…

Abstract

Details the experience of King′s Lynn and West Norfolk Council in installing closed‐circuit television cameras in its town‐centre car parks. Figures show that not only has car theft and theft from vehicles fallen by 91 per cent and 97 per cent respectively, there has also been a dramatic reduction in graffiti, litter, vandalism, drug dealing and glue sniffing.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1912

THE question of the advisability of exercising a censorship over literature has been much before the public of late, and probably many librarians have realised how closely…

Abstract

THE question of the advisability of exercising a censorship over literature has been much before the public of late, and probably many librarians have realised how closely the disputed question affects their own profession.

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New Library World, vol. 14 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2011

Angela Olsen and Sarah Heaton

Services for offenders who have learning disabilities are generally provided in secure and medium secure units. These services are often provided in segregated and…

Abstract

Services for offenders who have learning disabilities are generally provided in secure and medium secure units. These services are often provided in segregated and congregated settings using therapeutic interventions. This paper presents a case study of a housing‐based service provided within the community, based on developing valued social roles for vulnerable people.In 2003 the then Labour government in the UK sought to align all of the state benefits paid to people who were not in work due to disability and other disadvantages. The resulting ‘transitional housing benefit’ integrated housing benefit and other support grants, with the aim of providing vulnerable people and service providers with a single point of reference when it came to the funding of accommodation and support. The service is based on the principle of normalisation (Wolfensberger, 1972; Tyne & O'Brien, 1981), the theory of social role valorisation (SRV) (Wolfensberger & Thomas, 1983; Wolfensberger et al, 1996; Race, 1999) and O'Brien's Framework for Accomplishment (O'Brien, 1987) and provides a credible alternative to more traditional approaches.The paper provides a critical introduction to SRV and O'Brien's Framework and how their principles have been used to support people with complex needs. It discusses some of the structures and attitudes prevalent in society or, as Wolfensberger calls them, the ‘domains’ and ‘major channels’ by which people with learning disabilities are oppressed.The case study includes examples of practice and shows some interesting differences in patterns of referral and destination routes for males and females and concludes with some implications for practice.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Steve Gillard, Kati Turner, Kathleen Lovell, Kingsley Norton, Tom Clarke, Rachael Addicott, Gerry McGivern and Ewan Ferlie

The purpose of this paper is to describe a recent experiment in research coproduction in an evaluation of service planning at a London Mental Health NHS Trust. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a recent experiment in research coproduction in an evaluation of service planning at a London Mental Health NHS Trust. The paper aims to consider whether members of the research team who have themselves been users of mental health services are able to contribute to the research process as “experts by experience”, or if their experiential knowledge is “colonized” within the academic research team.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, comparative case study approach was adopted, using structured observations and semi‐structured interviews. Researchers' reflective accounts and a reflective focus group were employed to explore the process of coproduction.

Findings

The paper concludes that, far from “colonising” expertise by experience, the experiment builds local capacity in research coproduction and usefully informs a service planning process that reflects the priorities and concerns of a range of stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

The paper describes a small, local experiment in research coproduction and so findings are limited in their scope. However, the study demonstrates an effective methodological approach to evaluating, empirically, the impact of coproduction on the health services research (HSR) process.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates the potential for repeated exercises in coproduction to build capacity in collaborative approaches to both HSR and service planning.

Originality/value

The involvement of experts by experience is increasingly a policy requirement in the domains of both health service planning and HSR in the UK. There are very few empirical studies that evaluate the impact of that coproduction.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2018

Kati Kataja, Pekka Hakkarainen, Petteri Koivula and Sanna Hautala

The purpose of this paper is to discuss what kinds of messages about the risks of polydrug use are mediated in YouTube video blogs and on what kinds of norms and values do…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss what kinds of messages about the risks of polydrug use are mediated in YouTube video blogs and on what kinds of norms and values do the vloggers base these messages.

Design/methodology/approach

The data consist of 12 YouTube videos where vloggers share their own experiences of the risks and harms of polydrug use. In the analysis, the actantial model of Greimas’ theory of structural semiotics was applied.

Findings

Two main types of videos were identified – sobriety and controlled use – where polydrug use has different meanings. In sobriety videos, polydrug use is presented as the heavy use of multiple substances. In the videos dealing with controlled use, polydrug use is taken as the combining of certain substances. Whereas the sobriety videos emphasized total abstinence from all substances due to their destructiveness, the videos about controlled use emphasized risk awareness when combining substances. Despite modern digital media and a new generation operating in this space, the messages of the risks of polydrug use mainly repeat those of familiar discourses.

Originality/value

This paper offers an analytical insight into the ways in which the risks of polydrug use are conceptualized in a YouTube context that is increasingly gaining a foothold among the youth. Greimas’ actantial model offers a fruitful tool to find semiotic meanings that hide under the surface. The model has not been applied in previous drug research.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Jani Saastamoinen, Arsen Djatej, Kati Pajunen and M. David Gorton

Accounting standards for goodwill may intensify the agency conflict. Since auditors evaluate intangible asset valuations, this study examines to what extent being an…

Abstract

Purpose

Accounting standards for goodwill may intensify the agency conflict. Since auditors evaluate intangible asset valuations, this study examines to what extent being an auditor (including Big 4 auditors) and being female as indicators of professional skepticism and conservatism predict accounting professionals' critical views of goodwill accounting under US GAAP.

Design/methodology/approach

Statistical analyses of a survey of accounting professionals in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States.

Findings

The respondents' views are dispersed from trust in GAAP to views reflecting management opportunism in goodwill accounting. While being an auditor (including Big 4 auditors) does not predict a critical perception, being a female auditor is correlated with critical views to some extent.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was carried out in a limited geographical area and personal contacts were used to maximize the response rate, which may limit generalizability.

Practical implications

Standard setters can use the results to learn how practitioners perceive the current accounting standards for goodwill. The results provide users and preparers knowledge about potential pitfalls of goodwill accounting. Preparers could increase transparency to alleviate user concerns regarding managerial opportunism in goodwill accounting.

Originality/value

This paper extends the IFRS-based literature exploring practitioners' perceptions of accounting standards by focusing on goodwill accounting in the US GAAP environment. This study also contributes to the auditing literature by providing further evidence on how gender moderates an auditor's perception of accounting standards.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

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