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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Leony Derick, Gayane Sedrakyan, Pedro J. Munoz-Merino, Carlos Delgado Kloos and Katrien Verbert

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate four visualizations that represent affective states of students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate four visualizations that represent affective states of students.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical-experimental study approach was used to assess the usability of affective state visualizations in a learning context. The first study was conducted with students who had knowledge of visualization techniques (n=10). The insights from this pilot study were used to improve the interpretability and ease of use of the visualizations. The second study was conducted with the improved visualizations with students who had no or limited knowledge of visualization techniques (n=105).

Findings

The results indicate that usability, measured by perceived usefulness and insight, is overall acceptable. However, the findings also suggest that interpretability of some visualizations, in terms of the capability to support emotional awareness, still needs to be improved. The level of students’ awareness of their emotions during learning activities based on the visualization interpretation varied depending on previous knowledge of information visualization techniques. Awareness was found to be high for the most frequently experienced emotions and activities that were the most frustrating, but lower for more complex insights such as interpreting differences with peers. Furthermore, simpler visualizations resulted in better outcomes than more complex techniques.

Originality/value

Detection of affective states of students and visualizations of these states in computer-based learning environments have been proposed to support student awareness and improve learning. However, the evaluation of visualizations of these affective states with students to support awareness in real life settings is an open issue.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Tom Broos, Katrien Verbert, Greet Langie, Carolien Van Soom and Tinne De Laet

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the potential of “small data” to complement research in learning analytics (LA) and to share some of the insights learned…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the potential of “small data” to complement research in learning analytics (LA) and to share some of the insights learned from this approach.

Design/methodology/approach

This study demonstrates an approach inspired by design science research, making a dashboard available to n=1,905 students in 11 study programs (used by n=887) to learn how it is being used and to gather student feedback.

Findings

Students react positively to the LA dashboard, but usage and feedback differ depending on study success.

Research limitations/implications

More research is needed to explore the expectations of a high-performing student with regards to LA dashboards.

Originality/value

This publication demonstrates how a small data approach to LA contributes to building a better understanding.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

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