Search results

1 – 10 of 35
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Christine Danner, Katie Freeman, Samantha Friedrichsen and Dana Brandenburg

The purpose of this paper is to describe and compare the health behaviors of Karen youth with that of the other subpopulation seen at a Minnesota clinic.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and compare the health behaviors of Karen youth with that of the other subpopulation seen at a Minnesota clinic.

Design/methodology/approach

Demographic information and data on health status, recommended health behaviors and goal-setting patterns were collected via a review of the medical records of patients seen at a family medicine residency clinic in St Paul, Minnesota during a one-year period (July 2015–June 2016). Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. Data on Karen patients were compared with data on other populations.

Findings

The study included 765 youths aged 3–17 years. The Karen youth in the study engaged in recommended health behaviors more frequently than their peers on almost every measure. There were statistically significant differences in the amount of sleep, intake of fruits and vegetables, screen time, number of active days per week and consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks between the Karen and their peers overall. Karen youth also reported consuming fewer sweets and fried or processed food than their peers, and they had lower BMI percentiles than other youth.

Research limitations/implications

The study relied on participant self-report, which is subject to potential inaccuracies in recall and reporting.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study detailing health behaviors of Karen youth in the USA. The findings suggest a window of opportunity to support and empower Karen families to maintain healthy habits in order to prevent the development of chronic disease in this community.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 12 April 2019

Darren Wishart, Bevan Rowland and Klaire Somoray

Driving for work has been identified as potentially one of the riskiest activities performed by workers within the course of their working day. Jurisdictions around the…

Abstract

Driving for work has been identified as potentially one of the riskiest activities performed by workers within the course of their working day. Jurisdictions around the world have passed legislation and adopted policy and procedures to improve the safety of workers. However, particularly within the work driving setting, complying with legislation and the minimum safety standards and procedures is not sufficient to improve work driving safety. This chapter outlines the manner in which safety citizenship behavior can offer further improvement to work-related driving safety by acting as a complementary paradigm to improve risk management and current models and applications of safety culture.

Research on concepts associated with risk management and theoretical frameworks associated with safety culture and safety citizenship behavior are reviewed, along with their practical application within the work driving safety setting. A model incorporating safety citizenship behavior as a complementary paradigm to safety culture is proposed. It is suggested that this model provides a theoretical framework to inform future research directions aimed at improving safety within the work driving setting.

Content available

Abstract

Details

Egg Freezing, Fertility and Reproductive Choice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-483-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 12 April 2019

Kari Finley, Jay Otto and Nicholas J. Ward

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-617-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Katie Vasey and Lenore Manderson

The lives of refugee and immigrant populations have become central to often intense debates about cultural differences and their implications for multicultural societies…

Abstract

The lives of refugee and immigrant populations have become central to often intense debates about cultural differences and their implications for multicultural societies. The cultural practices assumed to be characteristic of such populations are the object of media comment and policy initiatives, and preoccupy social service practitioners daily. Drawing on an ethnographic examination of the everyday experiences of Iraqi refugees in a small regional town in Victoria, Australia, this article explores how social service practitioners address cultural difference as they seek to assist and support integration. The wider implications of emphasising cultural difference as a defining feature in determining and evaluating refugee integration are also explored. We argue that this emphasis fails to address structural inequalities that contribute to common forms of exclusion and marginalisation experienced by refugees and immigrants in Australia. This emphasis also risks contributing to what, in recent times, has become a dangerous stereotyping of refugees.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Katie Attwell and David T. Smith

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical framework for understanding the identity politics associated with parental hesitancy and refusal of vaccines for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical framework for understanding the identity politics associated with parental hesitancy and refusal of vaccines for their children (“vaccine hesitancy or refusal” or “VHR”). Understanding these identity politics helps policymakers to craft appropriate communication interventions that do not make the problem worse.

Design/methodology/approach

Social identity theory is a way of understanding how group identities develop around the lifestyle practices that often include refusal to vaccinate, and how this group identity is accentuated by conflict with the pro-vaccinating societal mainstream. This paper critically appraises existing studies of VHR to explore this groupness across many different contexts.

Findings

Groupness is evident across many different contexts. There are also key group characteristics: preference for natural birth and breastfeeding, nature as a concept and use of complementary and alternative medicine.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is speculative and theoretical, using existing sources. Future studies will need to demonstrate empirically with new data. However, this theoretical approach sets up a new research agenda.

Social implications

These findings can help governments and policymakers minimise social conflict that risks further polarising vaccine conversations and wedging parents on the fence.

Originality/value

This paper argues that the decision to vaccinate or not is an inherently social one, not a matter of pure individual rationality. This is a novel approach to engaging with what is often characterised and studied as an individual decision.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 12 April 2019

Ioni Lewis, Barry Elliott, Sherrie-Anne Kaye, Judy J. Fleiter and Barry Watson

Drawing upon the Traffic Safety Culture (TSC) perspective, this chapter outlines the reinforcing and transforming functions of advertising and illustrates such approaches…

Abstract

Drawing upon the Traffic Safety Culture (TSC) perspective, this chapter outlines the reinforcing and transforming functions of advertising and illustrates such approaches by drawing upon examples from Australian road safety advertising campaigns. The argument put forth is that road safety advertising can be a robust tool; it can reinforce other countermeasures (enforcement) as well as transform community expectations and values and thus ultimately contribute to social as well as behavioral change.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Katie Liston and Dominic Malcolm

To examine the ways in which sports-related brain injury (concussion and subconcussion) is both similar to and different from other injuries and to set out a sociological…

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the ways in which sports-related brain injury (concussion and subconcussion) is both similar to and different from other injuries and to set out a sociological understanding of the injury, its manifestation and management.

Approach

There is a broad contextualization of the ‘issue’ of concussion and the processes that have brought this to the fore, an examination of the ways in which concussion has been figuratively clouded from plain view, and an outline of the main contributions of the social sciences to understanding this injury – the culture of risk and the mediating effect of social relationships. The chapter concludes by questioning whether the emergence of concerns over chronic traumatic encephalopathy has stimulated a fundamental change in attitudes towards sport injuries, and if this has had a significant impact on the social visibility of concussion.

Findings

The two available sociological studies of the lived experiences of concussion are situated within a broader analysis of the politicization of sports medicine and the emergence of a particular social discourse around sports-related brain injury.

Implications

The difficulties emanating from the dominance of a biomedical approach to concussion are discussed along with the need for further research, incorporating a more holistic view of concussion, as a bio-psycho-social phenomenon.

Details

The Suffering Body in Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-069-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Danielle Herro and Cassie Quigley

This paper aims to broaden the conversation regarding STEAM by investigating the new form of education. The novelty of science, technology, engineering, art and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to broaden the conversation regarding STEAM by investigating the new form of education. The novelty of science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics (STEAM) instruction in K-12 classrooms means few cases of STEAM teaching are documented in depth.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a larger multi-year study researching STEAM teaching practices in 14 middle school classrooms in the southeastern USA, the article first summarizes prior research findings and then presents ideas for higher education and K-12 researchers to consider when incorporating STEAM teaching in pre-service education, professional development and in classrooms. Then, the authors use a second-order narrative approach to describe three cases of teachers enacting STEAM practices in classrooms.

Findings

Drawing on the notion of “remixing” education in the context of STEAM, the authors show how each teacher alters existing practices, instead of offering entirely new instruction, as they implement STEAM teaching.

Originality/value

With few cases of STEAM teaching detailed in the depth, this paper advances the understanding of STEAM teaching practices in K-12 classrooms.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Katie L. Oliver and G. Jill Davies

The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of appetite‐related, emotional and physical symptoms in a group of menstruating females.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of appetite‐related, emotional and physical symptoms in a group of menstruating females.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20 Caucasian females, aged 17‐24 years, completed a specifically designed menstruation symptoms diary for one cycle length.

Findings

The findings of the study indicate that changes in appetite and physical and emotional symptoms accord with hormonal changes in the premenstrual and bleed phases of the cycle.

Research limitations/implications

The implication of using a daily diary to identify symptoms demonstrates a record of the individuals’ perceptions of their symptoms and is therefore only subjective. The prevalence of appetite‐related symptoms was reported in the diaries but the quantity of food and drink consumed, and therefore energy intake could not be established for any of the endocrine phases.

Originality/value

Conducted on a very small scale this study can be considered as being a pilot for a more rigorous investigation into the understanding of diet in the identification and management of premenstrual syndrome.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 10 of 35