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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Russell Woodfield, Katie Dhingra, Daniel Boduszek and Agata Debowska

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of psychopathy facets on the relationship between traumatic exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of psychopathy facets on the relationship between traumatic exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomology.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were male prisoners incarcerated in the UK.

Findings

The analysis revealed differential associations between the two facets of psychopathy, with potentially traumatic events and symptoms of PTSD. Specifically, neither primary psychopathy nor trauma exposure were significantly related to PTSD, while secondary psychopathy was positively and significantly related with PTSD symptoms. Furthermore, the effect of trauma exposure on PTSD was found to depend on the level of secondary psychopathy. More specifically, trauma exposure was strongly and positively associated with PTSD symptoms for low levels of secondary psychopathy and negatively associated with PTSD symptomology for individuals with high levels of secondary psychopathy.

Originality/value

The findings clarify linkages among psychopathy facets, trauma, and PTSD, and extend the understanding of the presentation of PTSD in male prisoners.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Katie Dhingra

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198

Abstract

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Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Katie Dhingra

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185

Abstract

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Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Katie Dhingra

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202

Abstract

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Katie Dhingra, Agata Debowska, Kathryn Sharratt, Philip Hyland and Susanna Kola-Palmer

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of psychopathy factors and gang membership on moral disengagement while controlling for age, ethnicity, having run…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of psychopathy factors and gang membership on moral disengagement while controlling for age, ethnicity, having run away from home, family member and/or friend arrests, substance misuse, parental physical fights, violence exposure (victimization and witnessing), and maternal warmth and hostility.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on data collected from serious juvenile offenders (n=769) as part of the Pathways to Desistance Study.

Findings

Six independent variables made a unique statistically significant contribution to the model: gang membership, age, gender, violence exposure, and psychopathy Factors 1 and 2. Psychopathy Factor 1 was the strongest predictor of moral disengagement.

Originality/value

Results indicate that youth with heightened psychopathic traits make greater use of strategies to rationalize and justify their harmful behaviour against others. Implications in relation to theory and previous studies are discussed.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Katie Dhingra

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251

Abstract

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Sonia Shagufta, Katie Dhingra, Agata Debowska and Derrol Kola-Palmer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dimensionality, composite reliability, and incremental validity of the Measure of Criminal Social Identity (MCSI) in a sample…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dimensionality, composite reliability, and incremental validity of the Measure of Criminal Social Identity (MCSI) in a sample of Pakistani incarcerated delinquents (n=315) following translation of the measure into Urdu.

Design/methodology/approach

Four alternative factor models, with uncorrelated measurement error terms, were specified and tested using confirmatory factor analysis and bifactor modelling techniques.

Findings

Results indicated that a three-factor model provided a better fit to the data than the alternative models tested. The reliability of the scale was established using composite reliability. Furthermore, structural equation modelling revealed that the three MCSI factors were differentially related with external variables, indicating that the MCSI measures substantially different domains.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for theory and future research are discussed.

Originality/value

The results add valuable evidence as to the cross-cultural applicability of the MCSI.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Sonia Shagufta, Daniel Boduszek, Katie Dhingra and Derrol Kola-Palmer

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the number and nature of latent classes of delinquency that exist among male juvenile offenders incarcerated in prisons in Pakistan.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the number and nature of latent classes of delinquency that exist among male juvenile offenders incarcerated in prisons in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 415 young male offenders incarcerated in prisons in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) Pakistan. Latent class analysis was employed to determine the number and nature of delinquency latent classes. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate the associations between latent classes and the three factors of criminal social identity (cognitive centrality, in-group affect, and in-group ties) whilst controlling for criminal friends, period of confinement, addiction, age, and location.

Findings

The best fitting latent class model was a three-class solution. The classes were labelled: “minor delinquents” (the baseline/normative class; Class 3), “major delinquents” (Class 1), and “moderate delinquents” (Class 2). Class membership was predicted by differing external variables. Specifically, Class 1 membership was related to having more criminal friends; while Class 2 membership was related to lower levels of in-group affect and higher levels of in-group ties.

Practical implications

Findings are discussed in relation to refining current taxonomic arguments regarding the structure of delinquency and implications for prevention of juvenile delinquent behaviour.

Originality/value

First, most previous studies have focused on school children, whereas, this paper focuses on incarcerated juvenile offenders. Second, this research includes delinquents from Pakistan, whereas, most previous research has examined delinquent behaviour in western cultures.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Sonia Shagufta, Daniel Boduszek, Katie Dhingra and Derrol Kola-Palmer

Suicidal behaviour is a common in prisoners, yet little is known about the factors that may protect against thoughts of ending one’s life. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Suicidal behaviour is a common in prisoners, yet little is known about the factors that may protect against thoughts of ending one’s life. The purpose of this paper is to specify and test a structural model to examine the relationship between three criminal social identity (CSI) dimensions (in-group affect, in-group ties, and cognitive centrality) and suicide ideation while controlling for period of confinement, age, criminal friends, and offense type (violent vs non-violent).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 415 male juvenile offenders incarcerated in prisons in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Pakistan. A structural model was specified and tested using Mplus to examine the relationships between the three factors of CSI and suicidal thoughts, while controlling for age, offender type, period of confinement, and substance dependence.

Findings

The model provided an adequate fit for the data, explaining 22 per cent of variance in suicidal thoughts. In-group affect (the level of personal bonding with other criminals) was found to exert a strong protective effect against suicide ideation.

Originality/value

The research contributes important information on suicide ideation in Pakistan, an Islamic country in which suicide is considered a sin and subsequently a criminal offence. Results indicate that Juvenile offenders’ sense of shared identity may help to prevent the development of thoughts of death by suicide. Consequently, separating and isolating young prisoners may be ill advised.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Eithne Reilly, Katie Dhingra and Daniel Boduszek

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of teaching self-efficacy, perceived stress, self-esteem, and demographic characteristics (age, gender, education, and…

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5897

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of teaching self-efficacy, perceived stress, self-esteem, and demographic characteristics (age, gender, education, and years of teaching experience) in predicting job satisfaction within a sample of 121 Irish primary school teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from teachers from eight primary schools. Hypotheses were tested using a comparison of means, correlations, and multiple regression.

Findings

Results indicated that the predictor variables accounted for 22 per cent of variance in teachers’ job satisfaction. However, only perceived stress was found to explain unique predictive variance, with high levels of occupations stress related to low levels of job satisfaction.

Practical implications

Perceived stress should be targeted in efforts to improve teachers’ job satisfaction.

Originality/value

The results make an additional contribution to the literature by providing important information on the factors contributing to teachers’ job satisfaction in Ireland.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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