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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Danielle Herro and Cassie Quigley

This paper aims to broaden the conversation regarding STEAM by investigating the new form of education. The novelty of science, technology, engineering, art and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to broaden the conversation regarding STEAM by investigating the new form of education. The novelty of science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics (STEAM) instruction in K-12 classrooms means few cases of STEAM teaching are documented in depth.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a larger multi-year study researching STEAM teaching practices in 14 middle school classrooms in the southeastern USA, the article first summarizes prior research findings and then presents ideas for higher education and K-12 researchers to consider when incorporating STEAM teaching in pre-service education, professional development and in classrooms. Then, the authors use a second-order narrative approach to describe three cases of teachers enacting STEAM practices in classrooms.

Findings

Drawing on the notion of “remixing” education in the context of STEAM, the authors show how each teacher alters existing practices, instead of offering entirely new instruction, as they implement STEAM teaching.

Originality/value

With few cases of STEAM teaching detailed in the depth, this paper advances the understanding of STEAM teaching practices in K-12 classrooms.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

Drew Martin and Arch G. Woodside

Using brand netnography (analyzing consumers' first‐person on‐line stories that include discussions of their product and brand use), this article aims to probe how…

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Abstract

Purpose

Using brand netnography (analyzing consumers' first‐person on‐line stories that include discussions of their product and brand use), this article aims to probe how visitors interpret the places, people, and situations that they experience while traveling in Japan.

Design/methodology/approach

Through analysis of online consumer stories about their trip experiences, Heider's balance theory is applied to visitors' trip experiences. Follow‐up contact with the consumers allows application of autodriving methodology to gather additional post‐trip insights.

Findings

The results show immediate and downstream positive and negative associations of concepts, events, and outcomes in visitors' stories. Maps of consumer stories identify kernel concepts and include descriptions of how visitors live a specific destination's unique promises (e.g. distinct cultural history). Using the kernel concepts as a basis, Holt's five‐step strategy for building icons is applied to the travel destination to show how a destination can create a brand identity.

Research limitations/implications

Bloggers reporting their travel experience may not be representative of the population of travelers. On the other hand, travel blogs potentially can influence trip planning by other visitors collecting travel information.

Practical implications

Blog reports represent an unobtrusive method of collecting emic interpretive information from consumers. Emic reporting provides deep insights about consumers' trip interpretations. Tourism and hospitality managers can use this information to improve service experiences and design communication strategies to strengthen positive iconic imagery reported by consumers.

Originality/value

Emic and etic interpretations of travel experiences create a bricolage of the travelers' experiences. Autodriving methodology is extended to tourism research to gather additional insights and to better clarify informants' interpretations. This article also expands on a revisionist proposal to Holt's five‐step strategy for building destinations as iconic brands and suggestions for tourism management.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2016

Mick Cunningham and JaneLee Waldock

A small number of studies have suggested that parental divorce may manifest during adulthood as low-level emotional distress characterized by painful feelings such as…

Abstract

Purpose

A small number of studies have suggested that parental divorce may manifest during adulthood as low-level emotional distress characterized by painful feelings such as sadness or self-blame. In light of the paucity of existing research on distress, the current study was designed to assess the presence of distress among a sample of young adults with divorced parents and to ascertain whether painful feelings accurately describe the primary ongoing consequences of parental divorce.

Methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews with a sample of university students were conducted to investigate the concept of distress after parental divorce. Interview guides were designed to elicit responses about ways that parental divorce continues to influence the lives of young adults.

Findings

The study identified a set of ongoing stressors that do not overlap substantially with previous measures of post-divorce distress and that are often rooted in logistical difficulties. Three specific sources of distress are discussed: family coordination difficulties, struggles balancing the politics of parental expectations about time with their children, and perceptions of family fragmentation. These sources of distress frequently originate in the physical separation of parents’ households. Interviewees reported spending extra time and energy arranging family visits. Their choices about visiting parents frequently led to both feelings of guilt about the allocation of family time and a reduced sense of family cohesion. Ongoing logistical difficulties were much more commonly cited by young adults than painful feelings.

Originality/value

This qualitative investigation of distress suggests a significant re-orientation toward our understanding of the consequences of parental divorce is needed.

Details

Divorce, Separation, and Remarriage: The Transformation of Family
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-229-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Lois Dugmore and Saskia Bauweraerts

This paper aims to discuss an initiative developed between, Leicestershire Partnership National Health Service Trust and Turning Point, which is the locally commissioned…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss an initiative developed between, Leicestershire Partnership National Health Service Trust and Turning Point, which is the locally commissioned drug and alcohol service in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland. The aim was to improve outcomes for clients with dual diagnosis (co-occurring mental health and substance misuse) issues. The purpose of the change in working practice was to engage with local substance misuse agencies more effectively to improve clinical outcomes within this service user group. This was achieved through four interrelated approaches. This comprising providing an integrated service. It included building relationships with substance misuse services, providing specialist dual diagnosis clinics and the introduction of substance misuse workers onto mental health wards and group work specific to substance misuse. The outcomes included easier access to services for service users and greater uptake of service users who were moving onto substance misuse services. This led to a reduction in risk related to prescribing and fewer incidents related to prescribing changes and greater engagement in services. When service users were moving between services better communication led to prescriptions being transferred with no delay and to reduced dropout rates in service. There was improved access to substance misuse services, more referrals and take up of service taking place. There was a greater understanding by staff of co-occurring substance misuse and how to work with this client group. Closer working relationship with substance misuse services and shared skills led to greater confidence in managing this service user group. This demonstrates a cost effective service that can be replicated within similar settings.

Design/methodology/approach

In clinical practice, shared treatment has proved challenging in light of different service models (Laker, 2006). Substance misuse works on the premise of change comes from the individual, where recovery models in mental health offer a formalised approach. One of the challenges faced by services has been the inability for mental health services to recruit and services become overstretched (Rimmer, 2018); this gave an opportunity for a new method of working to be considered. This led to the development of a new service model.

These changes were:

• Improving the interface with substance misuse services to improve access to community substance misuse services for mental health clients.

• To provide specialist staff within the dual diagnosis field to provide a clinic jointly with local drug and alcohol services.

• Introduction of substance misuse workers as team members on acute mental health and rehab wards.

• Group Substance Misuse programmes.

Findings

Working within an integrated model, yet maintaining separate organisations, by offering joint training and clinics has led to a greater understanding of each organisation’s work and increased engagement within the service user group.The introduction of substance misuse workers to acute and rehab mental health inpatient services encouraged service users to engage at the point of admission and to be referred into locally commissioned substance misuse services prior to the point of discharge. Engagement with staff has demonstrated better engagement with substance service by service users following discharge.For clients able to take leave assessment could take place prior to discharge. This led to an increased uptake in services. Due to no opiate substitution given on discharge decreased risk of prescribed medication overdose at point of discharge and led to increase in returning straight to substance misuse services. This meant that service users received medication quicker and the right dose and on discharge ensured reduced risk. The prescribing of Naloxone at discharge is yet to be assessed, but the risk of an overdose within seven days is well-documented and Naloxone is key in reversing this trend. This change in practice can be replicated in any mental health setting and has increased access to services for those using substances.

Originality/value

Is original no other services have substance workers or joint clinics across the UK. First inpatient unit to welcome patients back post-discharge to attend groups.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Darrell Rigby and Barbara Bilodeau

The past dozen years in business have witnessed an explosion in the use of management tools and techniques. Keeping up with the tools and deciding which ones to use have

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Abstract

Purpose

The past dozen years in business have witnessed an explosion in the use of management tools and techniques. Keeping up with the tools and deciding which ones to use have become an essential part of every executive's responsibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

In 1993, Bain & Company launched a multiyear research project to get the facts about management tool use. Over 12 years Bain assembled a global database of more than 7,000 respondents, including 960 this year. They supplement the survey with follow‐up interviews to probe the specifics of tool use in individual companies.

Findings

This year, the news is that executives are using more tools for acquiring customers, keeping them, learning more about what they want, and then satisfying and delighting them. They know they need tools to innovate, but they are not entirely sure how to go about it. To free up cash, they are outsourcing like crazy. And they are relying on information technology to run their businesses more efficiently.

Research limitations/implications

This survey formerly was done annually and now is taken every other year.

Practical implications

Managers who promote tool fads undermine employees' confidence that they can create the change that is needed. Executives are better served by championing realistic strategic directions – and viewing the specific tools they use to get there as subordinate to the strategy.

Originality/value

Without satisfaction and usage data from companies that have adopted management tools, choosing and using them becomes a risky and potentially expensive gamble.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Fola Esan, Katie Case, Jacques Louis, Jemma Kirby, Lucinda Cheshire, Jannette Keefe and Maggie Petty

This paper aims to describe how a patient centred recovery approach was implemented in a secure learning disabilities service.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe how a patient centred recovery approach was implemented in a secure learning disabilities service.

Design/methodology/approach

There are no specific tools for measuring recovery in a secure learning disabilities service. The Recovery Star; a measure of individual recovery was adopted for use among the patients. Staff underwent training on the use of the Recovery Star tool after which a multidisciplinary steering group made some modifications to the tool. Training was cascaded to staff throughout the service and use of the Recovery Star tool was embedded in the care programme approach process.

Findings

It was found that implementing a recovery approach with the Recovery Star tool was a beneficial process for the service but that services will require a whole systems approach to implementing recovery. Key workers working with patients thought that the structure of the Recovery Star tool opened up avenues for discussing topics covered in the domains of the Recovery Star tool which may otherwise have not been discussed as fully.

Practical implications

The availability of a tool, integrated into existing service processes, e.g. care programme approach and accompanied by a systems approach, equips patients and staff for articulating and measuring the recovery journey.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the Recovery Star tool, embedded in a care programme approach process, equips patients and staff for measuring the recovery journey.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Allison Faix

This study aims to look at three classes of first-year students enrolled in an Information Literacy course and examines the difficulties these students encountered when…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to look at three classes of first-year students enrolled in an Information Literacy course and examines the difficulties these students encountered when attempting to identify different types of information.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, 41 annotated bibliography assignments, in which students were required to state which type of source they had chosen and why were examined and trends in the misidentification of sources were analysed.

Findings

Students in the study misidentified half of the sources they used, and struggled equally when identifying sources they located through library databases and the Internet. Trends in the misidentification of these sources were analysed, leading to recommendations for assisting students with learning how to identify sources.

Research limitations and implications

Although the sample size of this study was small, further research into how students identify different types of information would help librarians develop further strategies for teaching source identification as a first step in the source evaluation process.

Originality/value

Librarians and writing instructors often collaborate to help first-year college students learn how to evaluate the sources they use in research projects, but often overlook making sure these students can first correctly identify the different types of information they are evaluating.

Details

Library Review, vol. 63 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 16 May 2022

Kim Poldner and Rolien Blanken

Teaching formats for both BA/MA students and MBA/PhD students in sustainable entrepreneurship and strategic management are offered in the teaching notes.

Abstract

Study level/applicability

Teaching formats for both BA/MA students and MBA/PhD students in sustainable entrepreneurship and strategic management are offered in the teaching notes.

Subject area

This case juxtaposes the company’s core values of gender equality, sustainability and inclusivity, with the financial pressures of expanding global operations in COVID-19 times.

Case overview

This case illustrates the founding and growth of i-did in the broader context of the global circular textile industry. Being the first company that reclaims value of discarded textiles by making design products out of felt, the dilemma is on how i-did can create a blueprint for sustainable leadership in a scalable (financial) business case.

Expected learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of this case are as follows: to understand the concepts of circular economy and social impact and how they can be translated to business; to apply their knowledge of strategy and entrepreneurship for sustainable business innovation; to be able to analyze a company according to the Sustainable Development Goals, specifically around gender issues, inclusivity and diversity; to evaluate opportunities for multiple value creation in business; and to have the knowledge and capacity to create a circular business with the help of the Business Model Template.

Social implications

This case engages students in critically reflecting on sustainability concepts in relation to i-did (theoretical value) and applying novel business model innovation tools to a real-world enterprise (practical value). The students get the chance to explore the ethical challenges the two entrepreneurial leaders face between short-term economic gains (or maybe even survival) and their core values of (gender) inclusivity, circularity and diversity.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes and a summarizing two-pager are available for educators.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

The Case For Women, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2732-4443

Keywords

Open Access

Abstract

Details

Online Anti-Rape Activism: Exploring the Politics of the Personal in the Age of Digital Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-442-7

Open Access

Abstract

Details

Online Anti-Rape Activism: Exploring the Politics of the Personal in the Age of Digital Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-442-7

1 – 10 of 662