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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Kathy Eljiz, David Greenfield, John Molineux and Terry Sloan

Unlocking and transferring skills and capabilities in individuals to the teams they work within, and across, is the key to positive organisational development and improved…

Abstract

Purpose

Unlocking and transferring skills and capabilities in individuals to the teams they work within, and across, is the key to positive organisational development and improved patient care. Using the “deep smarts” model, the purpose of this paper is to examine these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The “deep smarts” model is described, reviewed and proposed as a way of transferring knowledge and capabilities within healthcare organisations.

Findings

Effective healthcare delivery is achieved through, and continues to require, integrative care involving numerous, dispersed service providers. In the space of overlapping organisational boundaries, there is a need for “deep smarts” people who act as “boundary spanners”. These are critical integrative, networking roles employing clinical, organisational and people skills across multiple settings.

Research limitations/implications

Studies evaluating the barriers and enablers to the application of the deep smarts model and 13 knowledge development strategies proposed are required. Such future research will empirically and contemporary ground our understanding of organisational development in modern complex healthcare settings.

Practical implications

An organisation with “deep smarts” people – in managerial, auxiliary and clinical positions – has a greater capacity for integration and achieving improved patient-centred care.

Originality/value

In total, 13 developmental strategies, to transfer individual capabilities into organisational capability, are proposed. These strategies are applicable to different contexts and challenges faced by individuals and teams in complex healthcare organisations.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Kathryn J Hayes, Kathy Eljiz, Ann Dadich, Janna-Anneke Fitzgerald and Terry Sloan

The purpose of this paper is to provide a retrospective analysis of computer simulation’s role in accelerating individual innovation adoption decisions. The process…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a retrospective analysis of computer simulation’s role in accelerating individual innovation adoption decisions. The process innovation examined is Lean Systems Thinking, and the organizational context is the imaging department of an Australian public hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

Intrinsic case study methods including observation, interviews with radiology and emergency personnel about scheduling procedures, mapping patient appointment processes and document analysis were used over three years and then complemented with retrospective interviews with key hospital staff. The multiple data sources and methods were combined in a pragmatic and reflexive manner to explore an extreme case that provides potential to act as an instructive template for effective change.

Findings

Computer simulation of process change ideas offered by staff to improve patient-flow accelerated the adoption of the process changes, largely because animated computer simulation permitted experimentation (trialability), provided observable predictions of change results (observability) and minimized perceived risk.

Research limitations/implications

The difficulty of making accurate comparisons between time periods in a health care setting is acknowledged.

Practical implications

This work has implications for policy, practice and theory, particularly for inducing the rapid diffusion of process innovations to address challenges facing health service organizations and national health systems.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates the value of animated computer simulation in presenting the need for change, identifying options, and predicting change outcomes and is the first work to indicate the importance of trialability, observability and risk reduction in individual adoption decisions in health services.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Ann Dadich, Liz Fulop, Mary Ditton, Steven Campbell, Joanne Curry, Kathy Eljiz, Anneke Fitzgerald, Kathryn J. Hayes, Carmel Herington, Godfrey Isouard, Leila Karimi and Anne Smyth

Positive organizational scholarship in healthcare (POSH) suggests that, to promote widespread improvement within health services, focusing on the good, the excellent, and…

Abstract

Purpose

Positive organizational scholarship in healthcare (POSH) suggests that, to promote widespread improvement within health services, focusing on the good, the excellent, and the brilliant is as important as conventional approaches that focus on the negative, the problems, and the failures. POSH offers different opportunities to learn from and build resilient cultures of safety, innovation, and change. It is not separate from tried and tested approaches to health service improvement – but rather, it approaches this improvement differently. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

POSH, appreciative inquiry (AI) and reflective practice were used to inform an exploratory investigation of what is good, excellent, or brilliant health service management.

Findings

The researchers identified new characteristics of good healthcare and what it might take to have brilliant health service management, elucidated and refined POSH, and identified research opportunities that hold potential value for consumers, practitioners, and policymakers.

Research limitations/implications

The secondary data used in this study offered limited contextual information.

Practical implications

This approach is a platform from which to: identify, investigate, and learn about brilliant health service management; and inform theory and practice.

Social implications

POSH can help to reveal what consumers and practitioners value about health services and how they prefer to engage with these services.

Originality/value

Using POSH, this paper examines what consumers and practitioners value about health services; it also illustrates how brilliance can be theorized into health service management research and practice.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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