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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Kathryn L. Ness Swanson

This chapter explores ways to think about historical “stuff” and how to use objects to create a rich presentation and understanding of both time periods and historical…

Abstract

This chapter explores ways to think about historical “stuff” and how to use objects to create a rich presentation and understanding of both time periods and historical figures. Items can help “set the stage” while also offering insight into subtle details about specific people, like their tastes and movements and whether they were right- or left-handed. These details help make the past come alive and provide avenues for people to make deep personal connections with historical events and figures. For teachers, objects can enrich their lessons by literally setting the stage with the items that witnessed historical activities and periods. Their students, on the other hand, might find that objects can help turn abstract historical events and figures into tangible happenings and people. This chapter discusses material culture studies and ways to interrogate objects before examining how objects can help inform interpretation.

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Kathryn Swanson

In an increasingly competitive marketplace and with homogenization of destination brands occurring alongside globalization, enticing tourists to travel at all, let alone…

Abstract

Purpose

In an increasingly competitive marketplace and with homogenization of destination brands occurring alongside globalization, enticing tourists to travel at all, let alone to a particular destination, can be a significant challenge. This paper aims to address this issue through exploration of the utility of the concept of brand love in the context of tourism destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation of the problem involved three large cities in the USA and utilized a variety of qualitative research methods, including tourist interviews, photos and collages. Additionally, the research included key informant interviews.

Findings

In total, 13 themes through which participants articulated their love were identified through thematic analysis of the tourist data, and these themes were drawn together in a model of destination brand love. Furthermore, three types of destination brand love were identified, and these coincide with three words for “love” in the Greek language.

Practical implications

The most significant managerial value of the article’s findings likely would come from tourism destination marketing organizations determining what type(s) of love is/are (or could be) prevalent among that destination’s most loyal tourists. Steps to do this are provided.

Originality/value

The complexity in tourists’ relationships with, and feelings of love for, destinations and their brands that this research has revealed demonstrates that there is opportunity for deeper understanding of how and why tourists come to love a destination and its brand. With this more complete knowledge, marketers would be better prepared to foster and grow brand love among their destinations’ tourists, resulting in increased visitation and revenue.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Lisa L. Heuvel

Abstract

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Lawrence M. Paska

The introduction presents the challenges of teaching history and social studies within a society that questions why we should learn about the past. It summarizes federal…

Abstract

The introduction presents the challenges of teaching history and social studies within a society that questions why we should learn about the past. It summarizes federal legislation and funding that have both expanded and limited history education at various times. It suggests that historical interpretation and performance are ways to engage students in their ability to make meaning of the past and engage in inquiry, at a time when student access to historical information and media is often overwhelming. The introduction concludes with a summary of all chapters as they advance a process for historical inquiry through storytelling and interpretation.

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Jocelyn Bell Swanson

Storytelling began quite possibly as early as 15,000 bc, with cave drawings of animals and a man. Enduring because of its appeal to the human spirit and imagination…

Abstract

Storytelling began quite possibly as early as 15,000 bc, with cave drawings of animals and a man. Enduring because of its appeal to the human spirit and imagination, stories illuminate and inspire as well as bridge a gap between fact and fiction. From the time we are little children, stories have taken us on a journey. Whether simple or complex, we use them to remember; we use them to create; we use them to disrupt. But there is a Part Two to the power of a story that can be found in telling it – in the act of becoming the storyteller. In either presenting a narrative or sharing the narrative as the character, one transforms from a learner to a teacher. And in that transformation is found deep understanding and learning. There is a story at every turn in education – in history, in languages, in maths, in science – everywhere. This chapter will discuss the tremendous value of the story, not just in the telling but as the teller.

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Dale G. Van Eck

In the online media world, students are usually the consumers of media content. The advent of social media provides a wide variety of content that is streamed into their…

Abstract

In the online media world, students are usually the consumers of media content. The advent of social media provides a wide variety of content that is streamed into their devices 24/7/365 much of which is unvetted and/or focused only upon the type of content that they have “liked.” While this content can be entertaining or disturbing, it remains within the realm of user absorption often without critical thinking or even a rudimentary screening as to the quality, accuracy, and authority of the content or its providers. The goal with the classroom uses of technology as it relates especially to the history classroom is to move the student from content consumer to content creator. Students who learn how to appropriately search for and vet relevant content in the process of creating a product that demonstrates learned knowledge on a given topic also learn what makes for high-quality production values in a setting that affords students the skills needed to more fully function within an online world. The concept of “Digital Natives” versus “Digital Immigrants” often separates students from teachers, but that, and in most circumstances, is not a truly dividing phenomenon that is seen in most classrooms today since the idea of lifelong learners has equaled the playing field. Success arrives when creative teachers and students are working together in a project-oriented study of American history that uses classroom-tested techniques that can assist educators and students in the management of technology applications to enhance learning.

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Jill Balota Cross

This chapter focuses on growing professionally and encouraging peers' skills. The author opens by relating her experience in initiating and implementing museum-integrated…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on growing professionally and encouraging peers' skills. The author opens by relating her experience in initiating and implementing museum-integrated instruction as a curricular program at all grade levels. She discusses the steps involved in creating one of the nation's first Museum Magnet Schools, from introducing the idea to her school and district to managing all the logistics needed to support it: funding, partnerships, professional development, curriculum writing, and partnerships. Strategically working with teachers, administrators, and organizations builds upon foundations in pedagogy and curriculum and reduces barriers to implementation. The chapter outlines effective strategies for building a dedicated team of faculty and administrators within your school, using professional development and encouragement to gain “buy-in” for projects such as school and student exhibitions. Such activities change the school culture in positive ways, with teachers becoming “ambassadors” to parents, professional learning communities, and other education stakeholders. Harnessing the power of connections to grow as a professional and growing communities of expertise cultivates performance pedagogy and brings history alive for students. By networking with experts from museums and historic sites, educators can tap into museum techniques such as exhibition design and object-based inquiry, which can be powerful tools for experiential learning. The chapter also contains outreach strategies for effectively presenting such initiatives at professional conferences and employing the power of social media through blogging and Twitter. As the author notes based on a decade of experience, the potential for student engagement from museum-related strategies is a persuasive argument for educators and administrators to collaborate in adapting them.

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Darci L. Tucker

Professional storytelling and interpretive techniques can be successfully adapted for the classroom. For educators, character interpretation is an especially effective…

Abstract

Professional storytelling and interpretive techniques can be successfully adapted for the classroom. For educators, character interpretation is an especially effective teaching tool. The author uses her extensive experience as an actress, storyteller, and educator to explain why character interpretation works so effectively to engage students and capture their attention. More than traditional methods of instruction, these established techniques put a “face” on history: They place people and events in a relatable, humanizing context that supports the teaching of controversial topics such as human rights and revolution. Using real-world examples, Tucker explains how character interpretation attracts people at all levels of ability and interest. Such presentations enable students to not only connect with historical figures' perspectives and motivations but also compare their own contemporary worldviews. Further, teachers can connect STEM education with history through their choice of people to portray, drawing from contemporary as well as historical figures to illustrate key learning concepts. This chapter outlines the educational value of framing a presentation within a socio/political/scientific context; doing so helps students to relate the presentation content to their own perceptions and to frame appropriate questions for the character if a Q&A takes place. The chapter further deconstructs the complexities of character interpretation into a series of manageable steps, explaining the sequence of storytelling from character conception to performance. Guiding questions at the end provide useful suggestions for dramatic presentations by teachers and students.

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

Keywords

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