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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2018

Elizabeth Hughes, Dan Bressington, Kathryn Sharratt and Richard Gray

There is evidence that novel psychoactive substances (NPS) are commonly used by people with severe mental illness. The purpose of this paper is to undertake a scoping survey to…

Abstract

Purpose

There is evidence that novel psychoactive substances (NPS) are commonly used by people with severe mental illness. The purpose of this paper is to undertake a scoping survey to explore the inpatient mental health workers’ perceptions of NPS use by consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional online survey of mental health professionals is used in the study. The participants were opportunistically recruited through social media and professional networks.

Findings

A total of 98 participants (of 175 who started the survey) were included in the analysis. All reported that some patients had used NPS prior to admission. Over 90 per cent of participants reported observing at least one adverse event relating to NPS use in the previous month. The majority of participants reported that patients had used NPS during their inpatient admission. Three quarters were not clear if their workplace had a policy about NPS. Most wanted access to specific NPS information and training. The participants reported that they lacked the necessary knowledge and skills to manage NPS use in the patients they worked with.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst the authors are cautious about the generalisability (due to methodological limitations), the findings provide useful insight into the perceptions of inpatient staff regarding the extent and impact of NPS use including concerns regarding the impact on mental and physical health, as well as ease of availability and a need for specific training and guidance.

Practical implications

Mental health professionals require access to reliable and up-to-date information on changing trends in substance use. Local policies need to include guidance on the safe clinical management of substance use and ensure that NPS information is included.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first survey of the perceptions of mental health staff working in inpatient mental health settings regarding NPS. The findings suggest that NPS is a common phenomenon in inpatient mental health settings, and there is a need for more research on the impact of NPS on people with mental health problems.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Katie Dhingra, Agata Debowska, Kathryn Sharratt, Philip Hyland and Susanna Kola-Palmer

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of psychopathy factors and gang membership on moral disengagement while controlling for age, ethnicity, having run away from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of psychopathy factors and gang membership on moral disengagement while controlling for age, ethnicity, having run away from home, family member and/or friend arrests, substance misuse, parental physical fights, violence exposure (victimization and witnessing), and maternal warmth and hostility.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on data collected from serious juvenile offenders (n=769) as part of the Pathways to Desistance Study.

Findings

Six independent variables made a unique statistically significant contribution to the model: gang membership, age, gender, violence exposure, and psychopathy Factors 1 and 2. Psychopathy Factor 1 was the strongest predictor of moral disengagement.

Originality/value

Results indicate that youth with heightened psychopathic traits make greater use of strategies to rationalize and justify their harmful behaviour against others. Implications in relation to theory and previous studies are discussed.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1968

THE library service commenced in Grimsby in 1901 in a former Mechanics' Institute dating from 1856 and, with a lending library erected on an adjoining site in 1910, the two…

47

Abstract

THE library service commenced in Grimsby in 1901 in a former Mechanics' Institute dating from 1856 and, with a lending library erected on an adjoining site in 1910, the two buildings served with moderate success until a German bomb destroyed the older of the two in February 1941, fortunately sparing the two special collections on Lincolnshire and the fishing industry. After the war the service was re‐organised and expanded in three wooden huts erected on the bombed site and in an old three‐storeyed house adjacent to the surviving lending library.

Details

New Library World, vol. 70 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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