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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Gillian King, Nicole Thomson, Mitchell Rothstein, Shauna Kingsnorth and Kathryn Parker

One of the major issues faced by academic health science centers (AHSCs) is the need for mechanisms to foster the integration of research, clinical, and educational…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the major issues faced by academic health science centers (AHSCs) is the need for mechanisms to foster the integration of research, clinical, and educational activities to achieve the vision of evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) and optimal client care. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper synthesizes literature on organizational learning and collaboration, evidence-informed organizational decision making, and learning-based organizations to derive insights concerning the nature of effective workplace learning in AHSCs.

Findings

An evidence-informed model of collaborative workplace learning is proposed to aid the alignment of research, clinical, and educational functions in AHSCs. The model articulates relationships among AHSC academic functions and sub-functions, cross-functional activities, and collaborative learning processes, emphasizing the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing collaborative learning processes and optimizing EIDM and client care. Cross-functional activities involving clinicians, researchers, and educators are hypothesized to be a primary vehicle for integration, supported by a learning-oriented workplace culture. These activities are distinct from interprofessional teams, which are clinical in nature. Four collaborative learning processes are specified that are enhanced in cross-functional activities or teamwork: co-constructing meaning, co-learning, co-producing knowledge, and co-using knowledge.

Practical implications

The model provides an aspirational vision and insight into the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing workplace learning. The paper discusses the conceptual and empirical basis to the model, its contributions and limitations, and implications for AHSCs.

Originality/value

The model’s potential utility for health care is discussed, with implications for organizational culture and the promotion of cross-functional activities.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Gillian King, Kathryn Parker, Sean Peacocke, C.J. Curran, Amy C. McPherson, Tom Chau, Elaine Widgett, Darcy Fehlings and Golda Milo-Manson

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an Academic Health Science Centre, providing pediatric rehabilitation services, research, and education, developed a Centres…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an Academic Health Science Centre, providing pediatric rehabilitation services, research, and education, developed a Centres for Leadership (CfL) initiative to integrate its academic functions and embrace the goal of being a learning organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical documents, tracked output information, and staff members’ insights were used to describe the ten-year evolution of the initiative, its benefits, and transformational learnings for the organization.

Findings

The evolutions concerned development of a series of CfLs, and changes over time in leadership and management structure, as well as in operations and targeted activities. Benefits included enhanced clinician engagement in research, practice-based research, and impacts on clinical practice. Transformational learnings concerned the importance of supporting stakeholder engagement, fostering a spirit of inquiry, and fostering leaderful practice. These learnings contributed to three related emergent outcomes reflecting “way stations” on the journey to enhanced evidence-informed decision making and clinical excellence: enhancements in authentic partnerships, greater innovation capacity, and greater understanding and actualization of leadership values.

Practical implications

Practical information is provided for other organizations interested in understanding how this initiative evolved, its tangible value, and its wider benefits for organizational collaboration, innovation, and leadership values. Challenges encountered and main messages for other organizations are also considered.

Originality/value

A strategy map is used to present the structures, processes, and outcomes arising from the initiative, with the goal of informing the operations of other organizations desiring to be learning organizations.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Sandra Parker, Kathryn Ray and Ken Harrop

Effective participation in the competitive bidding arena is one of the main vehicles for securing the necessary additional funds to maintain and develop UK public library…

Abstract

Effective participation in the competitive bidding arena is one of the main vehicles for securing the necessary additional funds to maintain and develop UK public library services. This paper documents the extent and scale of bidding by public libraries and presents areas of good practice emerging from research into the effects that the bidding culture has had on the development of English local government archive, library and museum services. Key findings suggest that approaches to external funding should be strategy‐driven taking place within a framework of purpose and rationale; that success is often highly dependent on the leadership and networking skills of library managers; and that partnership working should be encouraged and adopted. Successful proposals should demonstrate the benefits and credibility of proposers to deliver; provide evidence of properly resourced project management including methods of monitoring and evaluation; explicitly address the relevant funding criteria and be well‐researched and carefully planned.

Details

Library Management, vol. 22 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Sandra Parker, Linda Banwell and Kathryn Ray

Presents the findings of the LOGOPLUS project. The aim of this project was to ascertain to what extent the move to unitary authorities during the 1995‐1998…

Abstract

Presents the findings of the LOGOPLUS project. The aim of this project was to ascertain to what extent the move to unitary authorities during the 1995‐1998 re‐organisation of local government was seamless for public library users and staff. Case studies were undertaken in nine local authorities. Representatives formed the Steering Group which identified the following significant areas of change to be investigated: politics, finance, integration, co‐operation, staff, communication and users. Research findings have indicated a number of success factors which contributed to seamlessness: councillors and managers who were committed to the provision of excellent services; transitional finance sufficient to cover the process of the change; effective leadership; clear definition of mission and goals; multi‐skilling where appropriate and supportive users. However, some libraries have suffered because councillors or managers did not have a clear vision; there was insufficient finance; managers were not good communicators and there was little or no training for staff.

Details

Library Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Kathryn Lefroy and Yelena Tsarenko

The goal of this study is to examine the influence of resources provided to nonprofit organisations by corporate partners on the achievement of nonprofits' social and…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study is to examine the influence of resources provided to nonprofit organisations by corporate partners on the achievement of nonprofits' social and organisational objectives, accounting for mediation effects of dependence and relationship. This goal is investigated from the perspective of nonprofit organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Following 20 preliminary in-depth interviews, an online survey was administered to people working in nonprofit industry who had experience working with their organisation's corporate partnership. With 273 completed questionnaires, the authors tested the model with mediation analyses, using bias-corrected bootstrap confidence intervals method.

Findings

Although reputation, non-financial resources and cash investments have strong and positive effects on achieving social and organisational objectives, these relations are fully mediated by dependence and relationship between partners. Further analysis shows that relationship is a significantly stronger mediator than dependence on the effect of reputation in regards to the achievement of both sets of objectives.

Originality/value

This article builds on marketing knowledge, using resource dependence theory to focus on the effects of corporate-provided resources on nonprofit organisations; a topic largely unexplored in extant literature. It is the first study to operationalise and empirically examine the specific effects of different types of resources on specific nonprofit performance objectives.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Graham Coulson, Kathryn Ray, Ken Harrop and Sandra Parker

This paper presents some of the findings from research into the effects that the emergent bidding culture has had on the development of English local government archive…

Abstract

This paper presents some of the findings from research into the effects that the emergent bidding culture has had on the development of English local government archive, library and museum services. The project was funded by Resource and undertaken by the Information Management Research Institute at the University of Northumbria at Newcastle. The research revealed that the extent of involvement by archives and record management services in competitive bidding for external funds was dependent on a number of factors including the level of existing resource bases of archive services; the geographical and cognitive locations of archives; and the focus of external funding opportunities. However, the need for archives and records management services to engage in effective bidding is not likely to disappear, and it is suggested that these organisations must adopt a dynamic approach to bidding and marketing, asserting that their needs – ‘sexy’ or otherwise – deserve appropriate funding.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Kathryn Bewley, Cameron Graham and Songlan Peng

This article is a reply to “On theoretical engorgement and the myth of fair value accounting in China” Nobes (2019) from the authors of “Adaptability to fair value…

Abstract

Purpose

This article is a reply to “On theoretical engorgement and the myth of fair value accounting in China” Nobes (2019) from the authors of “Adaptability to fair value accounting in an emerging economy: A case study of China's IRFS convergence” (Peng and Bewley, 2010) and “The Winding Road to Fair Value Accounting in China: A Social Movement Analysis” (Bewley et al., 2018).

Design/methodology/approach

This article engages directly with the arguments of the criticism.

Findings

This article argues that the author of the commentary misunderstands the purpose, content and findings of both papers. By providing only a narrowly focused technical analysis of the new Chinese accounting standards, the author fails to see that their qualitative research approach reveals important, complex social and political factors at play in China's attempts to adopt modern international accounting principles. The commentary expresses a view that accounting is a neutral technology that needs only to be clearly defined and enumerated to be correctly implemented, whereas this research takes a much broader and deeper perspective. The authors seek to understand how China was able to successfully adopt fair value accounting standards in 2006, whereas an earlier attempt to introduce fair value in 1998 had led to abuse of fair value measurements and the eventual repeal of fair value regulations in 2001.

Practical implications

This article helps clarify the purpose of qualitative accounting research, the role of theory in such research and the usefulness of theory in describing and explaining empirical case facts related to changes in accounting standards, particularly in an international context.

Originality/value

This article contributes to a better appreciation of qualitative accounting research.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Annamma Joy, Kathryn A. LaTour, Steve John Charters, Bianca Grohmann and Camilo Peña-Moreno

In this paper, the authors argue that fine wines can be considered art and as such can be awarded luxury status. The authors discuss the processes of artification, through…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors argue that fine wines can be considered art and as such can be awarded luxury status. The authors discuss the processes of artification, through which such wines are recognized as art (Shapiro and Heinich, 2012), and heritagization, in which the cultural differentiation implicit in the concept of terroir (the various elements of a microclimate that contribute to a wine's specific attributes) connects a wine to its history and provenance. The investigation focuses specifically on fine wines from Bordeaux and Burgundy, which are renowned worldwide for their depth and flavors. What traits are intrinsic to the definition of art, and what social processes culminate in transforming an entity from nonart to art?

Design/methodology/approach

It is a conceptual paper that requires blending several viewpoints to present the authors’ own viewpoints.

Findings

This study aims to address the above questions and argues that fine wines, as a source of aesthetic pleasure, are themselves an art form.

Research limitations/implications

The implications for producers of fine wines and other artisanal products seeking to elevate brand awareness are discussed.

Practical implications

The findings of this study are of interest to wine scholars as well as wineries. They provide evidence as to how artification occurs.

Originality/value

While there are papers that address the issue of artification and heritagization individually, the authors bring to bear the importance of both concepts on specific wine regions in France: Burgundy and Bordeaux.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Ricardo Wray, Nancy Weaver, Prajakta Adsul, Kanak Gautam, Keri Jupka, Stacie Zellin, Kathryn Goggins, Santosh Vijaykumar, Natasha Hansen and Rima Rudd

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a collaborative effort between a health care organization and academic institution to strengthen organizational health literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a collaborative effort between a health care organization and academic institution to strengthen organizational health literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The intervention took place at a rural, federally qualified health clinic in Missouri between May 2009 and April 2011. Qualitative interviews of key informants were conducted before (n=35) and after (n=23) the intervention to examine program implementation and success in effecting organizational change.

Findings

Intervention activities helped establish a comprehensive understanding of health literacy. The project achieved moderate, fundamental and sustainable organizational change. The program successfully integrated health literacy practices into clinic systems and garnered leadership and organizational commitment, helped the workforce improve interpersonal communication and embedded practices making health education materials more accessible.

Originality/value

The study points to programmatic, conceptual and methodological challenges that must be addressed for organizations to improve health literacy practices, and suggests change management strategies to advance organizational health literacy.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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