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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Ann L. Casebeer and Kathryn J. Hannah

Efforts of governments to adjust the responsiveness and efficiency of their health care systems are evident across the globe. In the seemingly constant search for…

Abstract

Efforts of governments to adjust the responsiveness and efficiency of their health care systems are evident across the globe. In the seemingly constant search for solutions providing both better health outcomes and manageable costs, the directions and designs for change are neither consistent nor well studied. Opportunities for shared learning concerning what strategies for transforming health care systems lead to effective and sustainable change are being missed. There is an urgent need to study and understand the processes of change initiated by health policy shifts aimed at controlling health care costs, altering health service delivery and influencing outcomes of health care. In partial response to this need, research was initiated to study health policy transition within the Western Canadian province of Alberta. The primary objective of this research was: to identify, describe, compare and contrast the processes of change adopted and implemented in a variety of health authorities as a result of health policy shift. Change processes initiated by a specific health policy shift (the restructuring of Alberta’s health care system) were explored from the perspective of the change agents (individuals managing the health system reforms) in order to discover indicators of effective change and to identify questions for further consideration and testing in relation to change process related to health policy shift. This qualitative exploratory study coincided with real time alteration to the health system via legislated health policy shift. Findings relate changes in the structure, process and outcome of the health policy transition. Additionally, a number of questions linked to the reported findings are highlighted to encourage additional and continuing efforts to improve understanding of change process related to health policy shift.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Ethlyn Williams, Juanita M. Woods, Attila Hertelendy and Kathryn Kloepfer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of leader potential in an extreme context – it develops and tests a model that describes how subordinate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of leader potential in an extreme context – it develops and tests a model that describes how subordinate perceptions of individual-focused transformational leadership, subordinate trust in the leader and subordinate identification with the team influence supervisory evaluations of subordinate crisis leader potential.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were administered to emergency services personnel and their supervisors working in a large fire rescue organization in the Southeastern USA. Survey responses were analyzed using hierarchical regression.

Findings

Results support the theoretical model – subordinates reporting high levels of trust in their transformational leader were evaluated by their supervisors as having stronger potential to become crisis leaders. Lower levels of subordinate identification with the team strengthened the transformational leadership to trust association and the indirect effect of perceived transformational leadership on supervisory evaluations of subordinate crisis leader potential (through subordinate trust in the leader).

Practical implications

Supervisors who are viewed as transformational and fostering trusting relationships by subordinates are more likely to evaluate subordinates as having the potential to lead in crisis situations. In an extreme context within an organization facing change, subordinates who identify less with their team might build a more trusting relationship with a leader who is perceived as demonstrating transformational behaviors.

Social implications

Subordinate focus on the leader appears to enhance supervisory evaluations of subordinate potential (for leader development) in the study. Individual-level rewards for employees that involve competition might counter efforts toward shared mental models and remain the greatest challenge in the public emergency services setting.

Originality/value

Evaluating leader development, in terms of crisis leader potential, in an extreme context using a process model – to understand the interplay of individual-focused transformational leadership and trust given the moderating effect of team identification – is a key strength of the current study.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 3 March 2016

Susanne Braun, Birgit Schyns and Claudia Peus

In this final chapter, we summarize the core challenges to leadership in complex organizational systems as well as the lessons that we believe leaders can learn from the…

Abstract

In this final chapter, we summarize the core challenges to leadership in complex organizational systems as well as the lessons that we believe leaders can learn from the contributions presented in this book. Building on Complexity Leadership Theory (Uhl-Bien & Marion, 2009), we argue that high levels of complexity characterize the contexts described, and that they are unusual because they deviate from the setting of standard business organizations. Since these contexts are not often discussed in the general leadership literature, there seems to be a largely unused potential in terms of leadership learning. Specifically, in order to better contextualize leadership, scholars and practitioners need to take organizational complexity into account. With reference to the underlying structure of the book, core challenges to leadership are proposed, clustering around four main foci: sports and competition, high risk, creativity and innovation, care and community. Subsequently, we derive six lessons for leadership: adaptability, perseverance, handling paradox, leading with values, inventing the future, and sharing responsibility. We thereby hope to stimulate fruitful discussions that put leadership into context and capitalize on complexity theory as an innovative approach to leadership research and practice.

Details

Leadership Lessons from Compelling Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-942-8

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2014

Patrick Blessinger and John M. Carfora

This chapter provides an introduction to how the inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach is being used by colleges and universities around the world to improve faculty and…

Abstract

This chapter provides an introduction to how the inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach is being used by colleges and universities around the world to improve faculty and institutional development and to strengthen the interconnections between teaching, learning, and research. This chapter provides a synthesis and analysis of all the chapters in the volume, which present a range of perspectives, case studies, and empirical research on how IBL is being used across a range of courses across a range of institutions to enhance faculty and institutional development. This chapter argues that the IBL approach has great potential to enhance and transform teaching and learning. Given the growing demands placed on education to meet a diverse range of complex political, economic, and social problems and personal needs, this chapter argues that education should be a place where lifelong and lifewide learning is cultivated and where self-directed learning is nurtured. To that end, this chapter argues that IBL helps cultivate a learning environment that is more meaningful, responsive, integrated, and purposeful.

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Inquiry-based Learning for Faculty and Institutional Development: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-235-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Kathryn Covier Hannah

Libraries should not be put off by the initial investment required to build an annual fund. Although direct mail is expensive, it is the only way to acquire a large number…

Abstract

Libraries should not be put off by the initial investment required to build an annual fund. Although direct mail is expensive, it is the only way to acquire a large number of new donors to launch an annual fund program. Such programs can raise significant revenue for library operations. They work on the premise that a large base of so‐called “small” donors, giving year after year, can provide a level of stable support beyond money raised for special projects. Includes a proven 13‐step plan for building an annual fund using direct mail techniques.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Sheila Dolores Arnold

This chapter offers professional advice for educators, particularly those unfamiliar with history-based performance, on how to move their historic character research to…

Abstract

This chapter offers professional advice for educators, particularly those unfamiliar with history-based performance, on how to move their historic character research to the place of actual portrayal. Using a questioning method, the author takes the reader step-by-step through essential elements of historical character portrayal such as character perspective, props, and costuming, placing them within the context of educational objectives and performance logistics. The author discusses in detail differences between portraying a well-known historical figure versus someone connected to that person. She explains the importance of choosing a date for a first-person portrayal, as it defines what the character “knows,” and provides techniques for handling questions beyond the character's date range. For newcomers to researching and portraying historical figures, it is important to consider the following points: What is each character teaching? Where will the presentation be held? Is the presentation solely for students, or does it include peers, parents, or administrators? This chapter addresses these critical questions along with research techniques, performance methods, and practical suggestions for obtaining costumes and props. In addition, the author discusses presentation skills required for an effective presentation, such as voice, mood, and movement. She provides examples from her own professional repertoire showing how techniques such as pace level and articulation work effectively in front of an audience and breaks down the structure of a 20- to 45-minute presentation. The author gives examples of how to be prepared for audience questions and unexpected interruptions during a performance. Finally, she explains the importance of the “story” in historic character presentations to enhance its teaching and presentation effectiveness.

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Stephen Timmons, Frank Coffey and Paraskevas Vezyridis

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the implementation of lean methods in an Emergency Department (ED) and the role of the professions in this process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the implementation of lean methods in an Emergency Department (ED) and the role of the professions in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative, semi-structured interviews with ED staff in a UK NHS hospital.

Findings

Lean was met with more engagement and enthusiasm by the professionals than is usually reported in the literature. The main reasons for this were a combination of a national policy, the unique clinical environment and the status of the professional project for doctors in emergency medicine.

Research limitations/implications

Single site, one-off study.

Practical implications

The status and development of professionals involved may play a big part in the acceptability of initiatives like lean methods in health care. The longer term sustainability of the organisational changes introduced remains open to question.

Originality/value

This paper analyses the success of lean methods in health care with reference to the professional status and stage of development of the professions involved, using the sociology of professions. This approach has not been used elsewhere.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Laura Mauldin and Tara Fannon

The purpose of this paper is to provide a literature review of investigations into the specific disability of deafness in the field of sociology and other closely related fields.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a literature review of investigations into the specific disability of deafness in the field of sociology and other closely related fields.

Methodology/approach

After a pilot search using databases appropriate to social science research, we developed key search terms and, using an inductive approach, we identified major themes in the literature.

Findings

Our review shows that deafness has been investigated for a long time in sociology and other related fields, that there is a wide range of themes in scholarly work on the experiences of deaf communities and deaf people, and that conceptualizations of deafness and d/Deaf communities have changed over time. We organize this paper around six major themes we identified, and a few highlighted pieces of scholarship illustrate these themes along the way. We particularly focus on scholarship from the late 1960s through the early 1990s as emblematic of seismic shifts in studying deafness, although we do highlight little known nineteenth century work as well.

Research implications

This paper captures the legacy of this past scholarship and reveals that deafness is a rich site of inquiry that can contribute to the field of sociology. It is also a valuable resource for any future sociological research into deafness, deaf people, and deaf communities. We conclude with a discussion of our findings, commentary on the extent to which previous scholarship on the sociology of deafness has or has not figured into current scholarship and suggestions for future research.

Details

Sociology Looking at Disability: What Did We Know and When Did We Know it
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-478-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Marjorie Peregoy, Julia M. Rholes and Sandra L. Tucker

This is a resource guide for librarians who wish to gather books and other materials to use in promoting National Women's History Week or, as it will be soon, National…

Abstract

This is a resource guide for librarians who wish to gather books and other materials to use in promoting National Women's History Week or, as it will be soon, National Women's History Month. The emphasis is on history rather than on current women's issues. Most of the materials cited have appeared within the past ten years, but a few important older works are included as well.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Brian A. Burt, Kathryn Lundgren and Joshua Schroetter

Professionals in higher education are expected to be informed consumers of knowledge who seek out scholarship, critical evaluators of the applicability of extant…

Abstract

Purpose

Professionals in higher education are expected to be informed consumers of knowledge who seek out scholarship, critical evaluators of the applicability of extant knowledge, and contributors who build new knowledge for higher education practice. Despite the understood importance of developing research competencies, many have limited opportunities to develop these skills. This study aims to explore one way individuals develop research competencies: through participation in team-based research experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal case study approach was used to investigate what participants in an education research group learn, and how their participation in the group changes the ways in which they think about themselves as researchers and scholars. Four group members participated in two focus group interviews (at the end of the fall 2015 and spring 2016 academic semesters). Interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Study participants report gaining knowledge about research, developing an identity as a researcher, and learning about faculty roles. Particular group practices and activities (e.g. full group meetings, subgroup meetings, professional development moments) helped mediate members’ learning and identity development.

Originality/value

Research groups should be considered valuable contexts where teaching and learning take place. By learning – and integrating what we learn – from research group participation, the higher education and student affairs fields may become better able to generate innovative practices and activities that provide students and professionals with opportunities to develop important research competencies.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

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