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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Kathryn Frazer Winsted and Paul G. Patterson

Services represent the fastest growing portion of the world economy, yet they are still vastly under‐represented in the export packages of most countries. Services present…

Abstract

Services represent the fastest growing portion of the world economy, yet they are still vastly under‐represented in the export packages of most countries. Services present unique challenges that make exporting potentially more difficult and riskier than for goods industries, yet they also offer huge untapped potential with very little research done in this area. This study develops hypotheses regarding the exporting decisions of services companies using qualitative interviews and the exporting literature. These are then tested through a survey of nearly 700 consulting engineering firms. Nearly 90 per cent of the exporting firms in the sample are happy with the performance of their exporting programs, yet nearly three‐quarters of the firms are not exporting. Overcoming limitations in know‐how and resources, developing positive attitudes about exporting, recognizing foreign opportunities and fostering management commitment to exporting are found to be the most important determinants of exporting behavior for professional services firms.

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Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Kathryn Frazer Winsted

Examines behaviors of doctors that influence patient evaluation of medical encounters. It examines these behaviors in both the USA and Japan and compares the findings. A…

Abstract

Examines behaviors of doctors that influence patient evaluation of medical encounters. It examines these behaviors in both the USA and Japan and compares the findings. A list of behaviors relevant to patient evaluation of a medical encounter is developed. Performance of these behaviors in specific medical transactions is then examined and the relationship between performance of each behavior and encounter satisfaction is analyzed. Behaviors are grouped, using factor analysis from consumer surveys, into four dimensions in the USA (concern, civility, congeniality and attention) and five dimensions in Japan (concern, civility, congeniality, communication, and courtesy). Each is defined using multiple behavioral measures. Despite many differences in the cultures of these two countries and their medical delivery systems, many similarities are found in how consumers evaluate medical services in the two countries. Measures include some concepts not widely addressed in current services literature, including conversation, genuineness, attitude, and demeanor. These dimensions and constituent behaviors provide a framework for future research and medical training and management.

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International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Kathryn Frazer Winsted

Examines service provider behaviors that influence customer evaluation of service encounters. Develops a list of service provider behaviors relevant to customer evaluation…

Abstract

Examines service provider behaviors that influence customer evaluation of service encounters. Develops a list of service provider behaviors relevant to customer evaluation of a service encounter. Examines performance of these behaviors in specific restaurant and medical transactions. Then examines the relationship between performance of each behavior and encounter satisfaction. Behaviors are grouped, using factor analysis from consumer surveys, into three dimensions: concern, civility, and congeniality. Each is defined using multiple behavioral measures. Measures include concepts not widely addressed in current services literature, including conversation, respect, genuineness, attitude, and demeanor. These dimensions and constituent behaviors provide a framework for future research and service training and management.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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