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1 – 10 of 16
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Kathryn A. Burnett and Mike Danson

Attempts to diversify and regenerate the rural economy often embrace a particular representation of the local culture and society. The quality food product industry in…

2389

Abstract

Attempts to diversify and regenerate the rural economy often embrace a particular representation of the local culture and society. The quality food product industry in particular has secured its status as a key player in the future of rural Scotland, Analysed here is the development of the cluster and enterprise strategies which seek to add value to advance competitive advantage in both domestic and global markets. Based in a consideration of the policy frameworks for rural Scotland, and of the food and tourism sectors especially (both prioritised by Scottish Enterprise and Highlands & Islands Enterprise as key sectors), this paper presents a critical evaluation of how value is construed through an examination of current case studies of Scottish quality food production and promotion. The paper considers how the promotion of particular signifiers of “added value” has implications for how regionality, rurality, quality and Scottishness are all defined.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2014

Mike Danson and Kathryn Burnett

This chapter contributes to addressing the gap in the literature on entrepreneurs and enterprise in island and remote rural environments.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter contributes to addressing the gap in the literature on entrepreneurs and enterprise in island and remote rural environments.

Approach

The research, policy and practice literature on island enterprises and entrepreneurs is reviewed, taking Scotland as a focus within wider international contexts. Islands – as spaces and cultural places – are recognised in terms of ‘otherness’ and difference, not least in respect of tourism and culture. The importance of distance, isolation and peripherality is discussed as social constructions – myths and narratives – as well as in their mainstream measured equivalences. Agencies and policies are introduced at different levels and given significance reflecting their particular relevance in remote and isolated communities. The significance of the dominant paradigm founded on agglomeration, clusters, connectivity, proximity and competitiveness in the peripheralisation of those establishing and running businesses on islands is explored critically. This is contrasted with experiences from comparative northern European locations of smart specialisation, innovation and resilience, and the underpinning key roles of social capital, relationships and cultural values and norms are identified. Sectoral case studies and enterprise are offered to examine these issues in context.

Findings

As this is an exploratory study, results are neither comprehensive nor definitive. However, they are indicative of how forces and obstacles apply in island and remote rural environments.

Research, practical and social implications

The study confirms the need to recognise social relations locally, and for policies and strategies to be proofed for locational differences.

Details

Exploring Rural Enterprise: New Perspectives On Research, Policy & Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-109-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2013

Bob G. Kilpatrick, Kathryn S. Savage and Nancy L. Wilburn

The primary objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of supplemental instruction (SI) as an intervention strategy to improve student performance in the first…

Abstract

The primary objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of supplemental instruction (SI) as an intervention strategy to improve student performance in the first intermediate accounting course. We perform analysis of covariance to evaluate the effect of SI attendance on course grades, after controlling for variables that have been found significant in prior research as grade determinants (cumulative incoming grade point average (GPA), financial principles grade, and whether the principles course was taken at a university or community college). Results indicate that SI attendance had a significant effect on the first intermediate course grade, with an improvement in course GPA of 0.74 for students who attended five or more SI sessions over those students who did not attend any sessions. Even moderate attendance (three to four SI sessions) showed a marginally significant improvement in course GPA of 0.41 compared with no attendance.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-840-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Ian O. Williamson, Meredith F. Burnett and Kathryn M. Bartol

The purpose of this paper is to develop an interactionist framework for examining how the cultural dimension of collectivism interacts with workplace attributes to…

5351

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an interactionist framework for examining how the cultural dimension of collectivism interacts with workplace attributes to influence organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

These issues are studied by using a longitudinal survey to examine the development of affective organizational commitment by a racially diverse set of young professionals in the USA.

Findings

Consistent with predictions, results showed a significant two‐way interaction between the cultural dimension of collectivism and organizational rewards on employees’ commitment.

Research limitations/implications

These results suggest that research may benefit from the development of theory that simultaneously considers the role that workplace attributes and cultural values play in shaping organizational commitment.

Practical implications

The findings of this study suggest that organizations may increase existing employees’ commitment by strategically managing the types of rewards they provide to employees with different cultural values.

Originality/value

While an extensive amount of research has been conducted on affective organizational commitment, the question of whether employees’ cultural values influence commitment formation is still largely unanswered. Thus, this study provides initial evidence on the interactive effect of culture and rewards on the formation of employee commitment.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Kathryn Waite and Tina Harrison

The paper has two objectives. First, it seeks to present a procedure for exploring web site development using the Internet archive (www.archive.org). Second, it aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper has two objectives. First, it seeks to present a procedure for exploring web site development using the Internet archive (www.archive.org). Second, it aims to test the assumption that over time a progression in web site numbers and interactivity is visible within an industry sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The Internet archive was used to view web site activity from 1998‐2004 for 21 randomly selected organisations generating a final sample of 106 web sites. Content analysis was used to gather information on web site numbers and functionality. Web sites were evaluated using existing models of web site evolution adapted for the financial services sector.

Findings

This paper produces meaningful data on patterns of web site development. Results indicate that UK pension provider web sites have increased in sophistication but remain underdeveloped.

Research limitations/implications

In this paper there is no qualitative web site assessment and thus no information on web site quality. This method is recommended as a starting point for a wider enquiry due to the incompleteness of some archived records.

Practical implications

The paper shows that for practitioners, a methodology for mapping the configuration and evolution of sector web sites will assist in developing Internet marketing strategy. For academics, awareness of web site evolution patterns will inform Internet research. For the pension sector this identification of unrealised cost‐efficiencies from developing online payment and processing functionality highlights a competitive opportunity.

Originality/value

Considerable commentary exists on paths of Internet development but there is little longitudinal research into patterns of web site change, this research addresses this gap. This paper is a novel approach to web site metrics that allows both practitioners and academics to trace changes in the Internet landscape.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Tina Harrison, Kathryn Waite and Gary L. Hunter

To critically assesses the extent to which consumers are being empowered by the internet, focusing specifically on the role of the internet in the context of online…

5614

Abstract

Purpose

To critically assesses the extent to which consumers are being empowered by the internet, focusing specifically on the role of the internet in the context of online pension information provision.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method study involving focus groups and observational research. Focus groups explored consumer meanings of empowerment and pension information needs. Actual information provision was measured using a content analysis of a sample of 20 pension web sites from 1996 to 2004 accessed from the internet archive.

Findings

While consumers generally feel that the internet is empowering, the sense of empowerment has not been fully realised in the context of pensions. The findings reveal gaps between consumer needs for information and information provision with implications for pension providers and consumers.

Research limitations/implications

Relies on consumers' own reported information needs. Pensions are complex and consumers may not fully appreciate the most relevant information in order to make an informed pension decision. Researching professional financial advisors could close the loop and help understand what information consumers should be using to make decisions.

Practical implications

Provides useful insights for pension providers and employers in understanding the value of pension web sites and the features/facilities that consumers value most in using them.

Originality/value

Addresses a key concern of government – insufficient pension provision – and helps to understand how the internet can be used to engage consumers in pensions and encourage them to take greater responsibility for and ownership of their retirement saving.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Robin M. Magalis, Maria Giovanni and Kathryn Silliman

The health benefits of whole grains are well established, yet intake remains below recommendations. Knowledge and familiarity with whole grains may increase short-term…

1306

Abstract

Purpose

The health benefits of whole grains are well established, yet intake remains below recommendations. Knowledge and familiarity with whole grains may increase short-term intake, but sensory properties can limit consumption. These factors usually are researched separately, thus, this study aims to explore the relationships among sensory liking, knowledge, attitudes and intake.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study had 69 college students participate in four tasks: sensory liking of whole vs refined grain bread, rice, pasta and tortillas; bitter taster status; knowledge and attitudes; and intake of whole grains.

Findings

Whole wheat bread and tortillas were liked, as well as their refined grain counterparts. However, white rice and pasta were liked significantly more than the whole grain products (p < 0.05), which are less familiar to most people. Higher consumers of whole grain foods preferred those samples to the refined product for some sensory attributes (p < 0.05). Bitter taster status was not related to sensory preferences. Understanding and recognition of whole grains was low, but attitudes were generally positive. Whole grain intake was overestimated by the food frequency questionnaire because of problems with the instrument and also subjects’ lack of understanding about these foods.

Research limitations/implications

The link between preference and consumption warrants further study. The survey used to measure whole grain intake was a limitation and demonstrates the need for an accurate and efficient tool. Although knowledge about whole grains is limited, the positive attitudes expressed by participants can strategically inform outreach. If people believe that they consume more whole grains than they actually do, they may have a false sense of security. Further research with different age groups and a wider variety of foods is needed.

Practical implications

Participants overestimated their consumption of whole grain foods, indicating that consumers may think that they are meeting recommended amounts but they are actually deficient in whole grain intake; thus, improved education and promotional efforts are needed.

Originality/value

Few studies examine the inter-relationships among sensory preference, bitter taster status, knowledge, attitude and intake of whole grains.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Exploring Rural Enterprise: New Perspectives On Research, Policy & Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-109-1

Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2014

Colette Henry and Gerard McElwee

The objective of this chapter is to lay the foundation for the edited collection of contemporary research contributions contained in this book. Specifically, the chapter…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this chapter is to lay the foundation for the edited collection of contemporary research contributions contained in this book. Specifically, the chapter is concerned with defining and conceptualising rural entrepreneurship.

Methodology

The chapter seeks to explore why and how a rural enterprise can be defined, and determines whether rural entrepreneurship is a distinctive category of entrepreneurship theory and practice. Building on descriptive rural enterprise taxonomies proposed in previous studies, the chapter considers the drivers and barriers impacting on firm start-up, growth and decline in rural environments.

Findings

The authors argue that there is little difference between a rural and non-rural enterprise in terms of structure, that is how the business is organised or managed, or how the characteristics of the individual entrepreneur are exhibited. Thus, it would appear that there is no specific category for, nor definition of a rural entrepreneur beyond that of ‘an individual who manages a venture in a rural setting’.

Research limitations

The chapter is based mainly on a review of extant literatures.

Originality/value

The chapter concludes that it is the exogenous factors that differentiate rural from non-rural ventures, and it is these factors that will have a significant impact on start-up, growth and failure rates.

Details

Exploring Rural Enterprise: New Perspectives On Research, Policy & Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-109-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 July 2018

Konstantina Martzoukou and Simon Burnett

This paper presents the research findings of the “Syrian New Scots’ Information Literacy Way-finding practices” research project, funded by the Information Literacy Group…

1773

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents the research findings of the “Syrian New Scots’ Information Literacy Way-finding practices” research project, funded by the Information Literacy Group of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. The purpose of this paper is to explore the information needs of “Syrian New Scots” (the preferred name for refugees in Scotland), their habitual and adaptive information literacy practices and the barriers and enablers they encounter within their new socio-cultural setting via their interactions with people, tools and processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected via interviews with three Local Authority Leads for Syrian Resettlement and focus groups with Syrian New Scots in three geographical locations in Scotland: two rural areas and one urban. Syrian research subjects were also involved in a drawing exercise that helped to contextualise the findings.

Findings

The main information needs expressed by participants revolved around the learning of English language which was linked to addressing health-related information needs, well-being and community engagement. All participants also highlighted the issue of socio-cultural differences in fulfilling everyday life information needs (such as health and housing). Information provision to Syrian New Scots requires a more structured process that acknowledges personalised information needs and it is tailored to the different stages of the adaptation process. The findings suggest that the “ways of knowing” that Syrian refugees bring with them are converging information experiences of past and new knowledge structures gained via different socio-cultural and migration experiences.

Originality/value

The research findings of this project will be of interest to local and regional support organisations and community volunteer groups who contribute to the social well-being and social integration of Syrian refugees. In addition, they may be of interest to public libraries due to their role as centres for educational and cultural orientation sessions, and as places of support for newly settled Syrian refugees and the communities that embrace them.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 74 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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