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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

H. Austin Booth and Kathleen O'Brien

This paper aims to ask how best to integrate cooperative and demand‐driven collection development in order to simultaneously lower costs, create efficiency, reduce…

1821

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to ask how best to integrate cooperative and demand‐driven collection development in order to simultaneously lower costs, create efficiency, reduce redundancy, increase the range of accessible materials and satisfy patron demand.

Design/methodology/approach

By means of example, this paper outlines ways in which the University at Buffalo Libraries are merging demand‐driven collection strategies with cooperative collection development and the rationale behind combining the two approaches.

Findings

This paper presents an analysis of three demand‐driven cooperative collection development programs describing the opportunities and challenges posed by such a combination and future directions in demand‐driven collaborative programs.

Originality/value

The paper provides insight into the structure and implementation of academic and multi‐type library demand‐driven cooperative collection development programs with possible applications for other library consortia.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1928

WITH the passing of Easier the British librarian enters upon summer arrangements and a new financial year at the same time. There have been no severe complaints of undue…

Abstract

WITH the passing of Easier the British librarian enters upon summer arrangements and a new financial year at the same time. There have been no severe complaints of undue financial “cutting” from public librarians; but there has been no very lusty jubilation caused by undue amplitude in appropriations. We may be grateful that in the general Stringency matters are not worse than they are. Our time will come. As for the summer work of libraries: of late there has been a tendency for the issues, during what are usually thought to be the slacker months, to approximate to those of winter time. This is not wholly, or even largely, due to the organization of holiday literature exhibitions and similar “added” activities, but it appears to be the result of increased reading habit. At the same time it must be remembered that last summer was not an out‐door one.

Details

New Library World, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 11 October 1995

Sarah Ann Long

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-881-0

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2022

Kathleen M. Bakarich, Amanda S. Marcy and Patrick E. O’Brien

This study aims to investigate the effects of COVID-19 working arrangements on role stress, burnout and turnover intentions in public accounting professionals…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of COVID-19 working arrangements on role stress, burnout and turnover intentions in public accounting professionals. Additionally, while all professionals have had to adapt to this rapid change in working environment, this paper explores whether the impact of this transition differs depending on demographic factors, namely, rank, gender, firm size and service line.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors survey 159 public accountants working in audit and tax on their perceptions of role stress, burnout and turnover intentions before COVID-19 and since. The survey used validated instruments from prior literature to capture these measures.

Findings

Results show that role stress, burnout and turnover intentions increased significantly since remote work began. Specifically, the rank of accountants significantly affects this association, with staff experiencing the most significant increases in role stress and burnout and seniors reporting significantly higher intentions to leave their current firms. Females experience a significant increase in feelings of emotional exhaustion and turnover intention, while males experience a significant increase in feelings of depersonalization and role overload. Finally, there is a positive association between firm size and burnout, with employees from national/midsize firms experiencing the largest increase in feelings of emotional exhaustion, reduced personal accomplishment and depersonalization.

Originality/value

Given that all prior research on role stressors, burnout tendencies and turnover intentions in the context of public accounting was conducted in the pre-COVID-19 work environment, this paper examines a timely and significant event that is likely to have a long-lasting impact on the way in which people work. As accounting firms seek to develop new working models and promote well-being among their employees, they should take note of the findings of this study that gender, rank and firm size result in differential impacts on role stress, burnout and turnover intentions.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Patricia Mannix McNamara, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Sarah MacCurtain and Michael O’Brien

The purpose of this paper is to report the experiences of redress seeking and organisational responses for targets of bullying.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the experiences of redress seeking and organisational responses for targets of bullying.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological research design was adopted. In total, 22 primary teachers (seven males, 15 females) in Ireland were self-selected for interview, following an advertisement detailing the study in a national teacher union magazine. Data were analysed utilising an interpretative phenomenological analysis framework.

Findings

All those interviewed had made official complaints as per available procedures for addressing workplace bullying in their schools. All participants had engaged in Stages 1 and 2 of the official complaints procedures including uptake of recommended counselling. Three participants ceased engagement at Stage 2. In total, 18 participants had engaged in Stage 3 with 12 ceasing engagement at this stage. Seven participants had proceeded to Stage 4. It is noteworthy that no participant articulated satisfaction with the outcome, but conversely all had articulated further upset and acceptance of the reality that redress would not be forthcoming. These participants who had exercised agency in attempting to seek redress were met with power abuses and cultures of collusion.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small-scale study with self-selecting teachers. The data point to some problematic assumptions underpinning anti-bullying policies in small organisations.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to discourses of power/agency in workplace bullying. It challenges researchers and policy makers to elucidate more carefully the issues surrounding seeking redress for bullying.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2008

Lesley Preston

At Shepparton in the Murray electorate of Victoria in 2007, the Federal Liberal Member, Sharman Stone, announced that under a returned Coalition Government, Shepparton…

Abstract

At Shepparton in the Murray electorate of Victoria in 2007, the Federal Liberal Member, Sharman Stone, announced that under a returned Coalition Government, Shepparton ‘would get a stand‐alone technical college’. One year earlier, the Victorian Minister for Education, Lynn Kosky claimed that ‘We lost something when technical schools [the ‘techs’] were closed previously. Yes, the facilities were not great but we lost something that was important to young people’. This article explores the development and demise of ‘South Tech’, Shepparton South Technical School, 1966‐86 to identify the ‘something’ that Kosky claimed was lost, and to argue that technical education is essential in a reconstituted system.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Kathleen Bentein, Alice Garcia, Sylvie Guerrero and Olivier Herrbach

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the consequences of experiencing social isolation in a context of dirty work. Relying on an integration of the job…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the consequences of experiencing social isolation in a context of dirty work. Relying on an integration of the job demands-resources model (Schaufeli and Bakker, 2004) with the social identity approach (Ashforth and Kreiner, 1999), the paper posits that perceived social isolation prevents the development of defense mechanisms that could counter the occupational stigma, and thus tends to increase perceptions of stigmatization, and to decrease perceptions of the prosocial impact of their work. Through these two perceptions, perceived social isolation indirectly affects emotional exhaustion and work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Research hypotheses are tested among a sample of 195 workers in the commercial cleaning industry who execute physically tainted tasks.

Findings

Results support the research model. Perceived prosocial impact mediates the negative relationship between perceived social isolation and work engagement, and perceived stigmatization mediates the positive relationship between perceived social isolation and emotional exhaustion.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the dirty work literature by empirically examining one of its implicit assumptions, namely, that social isolation prevents the development of coping strategies. It also contributes to the literature on well-being and work engagement by demonstrating how they are affected by the social context of work.

Originality/value

The present paper is the first to study the specific challenges of social isolation in dirty work occupations and its consequences.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Bridget L. Lamont and Kathleen L. Bloomberg

As Illinois completes 30 years of library systems and 100 years of the Illinois Library Association, it is appropriate to review “recent” history as a harbinger of what…

Abstract

As Illinois completes 30 years of library systems and 100 years of the Illinois Library Association, it is appropriate to review “recent” history as a harbinger of what may lie ahead for the Illinois Library and Information Network (ILLINET). The network of libraries in Illinois, formally named in 1975, recognizes the cooperative efforts of library staff members in over 2,700 libraries and the leadership of the Illinois State Library in bringing resources to bear on the needs of all citizens of the state. Libraries of all types (academic, public, school, and special) become members of ILLINET when they join their regional library systems.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2003

Jennie Jacobs Kronenfeld and Kathleen M Mathieson

Social policy linked to child poverty, welfare programs and needs of children has been undergoing major change in the United States. In 1996, major welfare reform was…

Abstract

Social policy linked to child poverty, welfare programs and needs of children has been undergoing major change in the United States. In 1996, major welfare reform was passed that eliminated the old cash assistance program of AFDC (Aid to Families of Dependent Children Program) and replaced it with a new block grant program, TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families). Advantages of the new TANF program were that it provided more flexibility to States, made the time period for which funds could be received much shorter, and therefore strongly encouraged adult welfare recipients to enter the workforce (Sherman & Sandfort, 1998; Watts, 1997). As part of this change, along with changes enacted earlier from 1984 to 1990, Medicaid eligibility for low-income children was expanded by gradually delinking Medicaid eligibility from welfare eligibility (Kronebusch, 2001). As part of a continued policy goal of expanding access to health care services to children at lower ends of the income spectrum, Congress in 1997 passed the Balanced Budget Act of that year. That act created the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). This program provided an opportunity for States to participate in CHIP and thus acquire funding from the federal government to expand their health care coverage to uninsured, lower-income children. This program was particularly aimed at children of the working poor, whose parents were often in the labor force but worked for an employer who did not provide health care insurance. The numbers of these parents were expected to increase in future years, as the TANF welfare reforms decreased the number of parents on welfare who were receiving cash benefits and increased the number of parents who accepted jobs. Many of these jobs will not provide the full set of benefits that are common in many white-collar and middle income jobs (Seccombe & Amey, 1995). The legislation allowed States to expand their Medicaid programs, create a separate CHIP program, or combine the two options (Shi, Oliver & Huang, 2000).

Details

Sociological Studies of Children and Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-180-4

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

George E. Smith, Kathleen J. Barnes and Claudia Harris

– This review explores the parallels between the characteristics of learning organizations and the characteristics of ethical organizations.

2509

Abstract

Purpose

This review explores the parallels between the characteristics of learning organizations and the characteristics of ethical organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature was conducted to examine the characteristics of learning organizations and those that encourage and support ethical behavior.

Findings

There are significant parallels between the characteristics of learning organizations and those of ethical organizations. These include leadership, culture, communication, systems thinking, and problem-solving orientation, which are important in creating learning organizations and in encouraging ethical behavior. These parallels encourage social network stimulation, acceptance of new ideas, open discussion, the ability to disagree without rancor, a lessening of hierarchy, employees seeing themselves as part of a larger whole. All of these elements create an environment wherein organizational members are able to contend with and resolve ethical problems.

Practical implications

When endeavoring to foster an ethical organizational environment, managers can be aware of the benefits of creating a learning organization, as the two correspond closely. Additionally, managers in learning organizations can leverage this capacity to enhance ethical decision making and behavior.

Originality/value

Research on learning organizations has often centered on their value in encouraging innovation and on strategies for implementing the changes needed to establish them. This paper identifies and discusses the parallels between the characteristics of learning organizations and ethical organizations. This is an area that has not been directly explored in the extant literature.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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