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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Susan Benbow, Louise Taylor and Kathleen Morgan

The authors describe how a user and carers were involved in teaching as part of the MSc in Applied Studies in Ageing and Mental Health at Staffordshire University, the…

Abstract

The authors describe how a user and carers were involved in teaching as part of the MSc in Applied Studies in Ageing and Mental Health at Staffordshire University, the impact that this had on students on the course and evolving plans to develop the work further.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Geoffrey P. Morgan and Kathleen M. Carley

We present a simulation designed to capture the impact of both formal authority ties and informal socialization ties on the performance of an organization adapting to a…

Abstract

We present a simulation designed to capture the impact of both formal authority ties and informal socialization ties on the performance of an organization adapting to a turbulent world. We present a summary of three key models that informed our approach and then outline and describe the operation of our resulting simulation. Using an experiment that manipulated both the authority network structure and the stress the organization placed on socialization, we show inefficient authority structures harm performance, and also that socialization has a strong and nonlinear impact on peak organizational performance and on the performance of top management. We also present a case study, instantiating the general model with the specific context of a real-world organization. Finally, our integrated multimodel suggests that companies should pursue different strategies in hiring key strategic actors than they do for other actors.

Details

The Garbage Can Model of Organizational Choice: Looking Forward at Forty
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-713-0

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Susan Mary Benbow, Anna Tsaroucha, Maurice Ashley, Kathleen Morgan and Paul Kingston

Through consultation with people living with dementia and carers, this paper aims to identify skills that patients and carers feel need to be developed in the workforce…

Abstract

Purpose

Through consultation with people living with dementia and carers, this paper aims to identify skills that patients and carers feel need to be developed in the workforce. This work is part of a project to develop competencies for the West Midlands dementia workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

People living with a dementia and carers were contacted through cafés, a carers' group and memory group, and two people contributed interviews to the analysis. All materials were analysed qualitatively using thematic analysis.

Findings

Feedback was received from 69 individuals. In total, six major themes were identified: knowledge about dementia, person centred care, communication, relationships, support and helping people engage in activities.

Originality/value

It is argued that people living with dementia and carers bring unique and valuable perspectives to an analysis of the skills of the dementia workforce, which grounds the required skills in the relationship between the worker and the person and family they are working with. This different emphasis needs to be considered and addressed throughout dementia training and education.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2009

Kathleen Morgan

This paper describes one woman's personal experience of Alzheimer's disease and her reflections on risk and what it means to her. From the point of diagnosis there are…

Abstract

This paper describes one woman's personal experience of Alzheimer's disease and her reflections on risk and what it means to her. From the point of diagnosis there are risks to the person living with a dementia, and alongside those for the individual come risks to the family who are also living with the illness. The author argues that people living with dementia must challenge risks, try to find ways round them and be supported to carry on taking risks, as the alternative is to give up control and give in to the illness.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Maryam Foroozesh, Marguerite Giguette, Teresa Birdwhistell, Kathleen Morgan, Kelly Johanson, Tiera S. Coston and Clair Wilkins-Green

Xavier University of Louisiana has a national reputation for producing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduates who go on to obtain MD and PhD…

Abstract

Xavier University of Louisiana has a national reputation for producing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduates who go on to obtain MD and PhD degrees. According to a 2013 National Science Foundation report, Xavier is ranked first in producing African American graduates who go on to receive life sciences PhD degrees, fifth in the nation in producing African American graduates who go on to receive science and engineering PhD degrees, and seventh in producing African American graduates who go on to receive physical sciences PhD degrees. Xavier is currently third among the nation’s colleges and universities in the number of African American graduates enrolled in medical school, according to data compiled by the Association of American Medical Colleges, and ranked first in the number of African American alumni who successfully complete their medical degrees. The success of Xavier’s graduates is due to a combination of university-based student support initiatives and externally funded programs, in particular, the Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD), Maximizing Access to Biomedical Research Careers (MARC) U*STAR, and Research Initiative in Scientific Enhancement (RISE) programs. These three programs, funded by the Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity (TWD) Division at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), offer select trainees undergraduate research opportunities, support mechanisms, and a variety of activities designed to improve their potential for success in graduate school. The BUILD, MARC U*STAR, and RISE programs work closely together and with the University to leverage the resources provided by each in order to provide the best experience possible for their students with a minimum of redundancy of effort. This chapter focuses on the program components and how the programs work together.

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Abstract

Details

Broadening Participation in STEM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-908-9

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2009

Margaret Flynn

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Shelby D. Hunt and Robert M. Morgan

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Kathleen Marshall Park and Anthony M. Gould

Merger waves have typically been viewed through the prism of either corporate strategy or macro-economics. This paper aims to broaden debate about factors that cause – or…

Abstract

Purpose

Merger waves have typically been viewed through the prism of either corporate strategy or macro-economics. This paper aims to broaden debate about factors that cause – or are associated with – mergers/merger waves over a 120-year period. It ascribes “personalities” to six distinct waves and draws an overarching conclusion about how merger architects are viewed.

Design/methodology/approach

Databases and interviews are used to piece together detail about CEOs associated with six distinct and recognized merger-waves during a 120-year focal period. The study establishes and defends, a priori, principles for interrogating data to get a sense of each wave-era’s corporate personality/idiosyncrasy. For each era, two exemplar CEO-profiles are presented and – through inductive-reasoning – held out as representative.

Findings

Distinct personalities are associated with six merger waves. Each wave is given a summary anthropomorphic description which conveys a sense that it may be viewed as the non-rationale expression of aggregate and historically distinct CEO behavior within a circumscribed timeframe.

Research limitations/implications

The work’s key limitation – explicitly acknowledged – is that it amassed data/evidence from disparate historical sources. However, the authors have developed and defended principles for addressing this concern.

Practical implications

Improved investment analyses, in particular. The work prefigures formal establishment of a new variable-set impacting share-price prediction.

Social implications

The paper offers a perspective on how psychological/personality-related variables impact management decision-making, creating something of a bridge between mostly non-overlapping research disciplines.

Originality/value

The paper broadens debate about how and why merger waves occur. It removes the exclusive analysis of merger waves from the hands of economic historians and strategic management theorists.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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