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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Kathleen Gribble

A Library Association Workshop is described which introduced theNVQ system of transferable qualifications. There is a brief synopsis ofrecent developments, together with…

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A Library Association Workshop is described which introduced the NVQ system of transferable qualifications. There is a brief synopsis of recent developments, together with their implications for the library profession.

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Library Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

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Kybernetes, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1952

LIBRARIANS, unlike the Surveyors and others, have not added “Royal” to their Association's title, yet the Library Association is one of the few, and now one of the…

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LIBRARIANS, unlike the Surveyors and others, have not added “Royal” to their Association's title, yet the Library Association is one of the few, and now one of the venerable, societies which draw their Charter Straight from the King. More than that, after we had enjoyed fifty‐three years with such Status, our King became our Patron, and the Consort of the Heir‐Apparent actually our President. It is in this proud position that we may share specially the sense of loss which the untimely death of George VI has caused in the world. Whether his patronage will be extended by his successor or not, we cannot be deprived of the consciousness of privilege which his recognition created, and we pay homage to the fine memory of him who bestowed it. Libraries are places wherein memories endure; our shelves prove that the most brilliant eras have been those with Queens‐Regnant. All who work in them are the loyal servants of the new, youthful Queen Elizabeth, who will be as much Queen of Hearts in her own time as was her namesake four centuries ago.

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New Library World, vol. 53 no. 19
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1951

THE London and Home Counties Branch is fortunate in having close at hand watering places which can house its Autumn or other Conferences conveniently. Hove in fair weather…

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THE London and Home Counties Branch is fortunate in having close at hand watering places which can house its Autumn or other Conferences conveniently. Hove in fair weather in October is a place of considerable charm; it has many varieties of hotel, from the very expensive to the modest; it is used to conferences and the hospitality of the Town Hall is widely known. This year's conference was focused in the main on problems of book‐selection which, as one writer truly says, is the main purpose of the librarian because all his possibilities hang upon it. The papers read are valuable because they appear to be quite unvarnished accounts of the individual practice of their writers. Of its kind that of Mr. Frank M. Gardner is a model and a careful study of it by the library worker who is in actual contact with the public might be useful. For his methods the paper must be read; they are a clever up‐to‐minute expansion of those laid down in Brown's Manual with several local checks and variations. Their defects are explained most usefully; there is no examination of actual books before purchase and bookshops are not visited, both of which defects are due to the absence in Luton of well‐stocked bookshops; a defect which many sizeable towns share. We find this remark significant: “The librarian of Luton in 1911 had a book‐fund of £280 a year for 30,000 people. I have nearly £9,000 for 110,000. But the Librarian in 1911 was a better book‐selector than we are. He had to be, to give a library service at all. Every possible purchase had to be looked at, every doubt eliminated.” We deprecate the word “better”; in 1911 book‐selection was not always well done, but Brown's methods could be carried out if it was thought expedient to do the work as well as it could be done. The modern librarian and his employers seem to have determined that the whole of the people shall be served by the library; that books shall be made available hot from the press, with as few exclusions as possible. No librarian willingly buys rubbish; but only in the largest libraries can a completely comprehensive selection practice be maintained. Few librarians can be quite satisfied to acquire their books from lists made by other people although they may use them for suggestions. How difficult is the problem Mr. Gardner demonstrates in connexion with books on Bridge; a shelf of apparently authoritative books might possibly contain not one that actually met the conditions of today. If this could be so in one very small subject, what might be the condition of a collection covering, or intended to cover, all subjects? Librarians have to be realists; orthodox methods do not always avail to deal with the cataract of modern books; but gradually, by cooperative methods, mechanical aids and an ever‐increasing staff devoted to this, the principal library job, much more may be done than is now possible.

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New Library World, vol. 53 no. 15
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2005

Christine Trimingham‐Jack

It has been at least twenty years since I was first alerted to the notion that my interest in a research topic arises from my unconscious. More recently, feminist…

Abstract

It has been at least twenty years since I was first alerted to the notion that my interest in a research topic arises from my unconscious. More recently, feminist theorists have developed the insight by arguing that integration of experience is helpful in defining research questions, as a source of data, to test findings and, in the words of Jean Bethke Elshtain, in assisting them to be less removed from the ‘wellsprings’ of their own ‘thought and action’. My aim in this article is to reconnect my experience with constructions of teachers in Australian children’s literature and to explore ways in which they are imagined in the literature. In my initial foray into this topic, I used Maurice Saxby’s historical review of Australian children’s literature as a guide for data gathering. This linear, chronological approach, while probably a helpful place to start, is not one I can sustain with any passion. In this article, I am returning to my experience to find a starting point, acknowledging that history is a ‘process of intellectual production as well as discovery’

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History of Education Review, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Noeline J. Kyle

Very little Australian literature looks at women as leaders ineducation. Using theoretical viewpoints emerging out of a biographicaland historical analysis, it is possible…

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Very little Australian literature looks at women as leaders in education. Using theoretical viewpoints emerging out of a biographical and historical analysis, it is possible to construct a more inclusive model of leadership which includes both men and women in the past. Mapping such a process historically and biographically can give a detailed assessment of the social, historical and political dimensions of particular women leaders′ lives and also develop a theoretical framework, which gives equal status to the leadership experiences more common to women. Presents a historical narrative where recording lives raises critical questions at the same time as it unearths new evidence of the history of women educationists in Australia.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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