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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Yu-Lun Liu, Kathleen A. Keeling and K. Nadia Papamichail

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the consequences of jobseeker decision-making style on information search behaviour, information evaluation and perceptions of…

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2160

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the consequences of jobseeker decision-making style on information search behaviour, information evaluation and perceptions of organisational attractiveness (OA). In this study, the authors assess whether, when presented with a realistic job information searching scenario of receiving basic job information from a typical formal short job advertisement, maximisers and satisficers differ on need for further information and evaluation of further information from informal information sources in relation to valence and tie strength.

Design/methodology/approach

A scenario-based experiment was conducted on 280 participants from the USA, with work experience in retail, using Amazon Mechanical Turk.

Findings

The results show that, compared to satisficers, significantly more maximisers chose to search for further information about the company/vacancy after receiving a typical short advertisement message. Furthermore, the results highlight the moderating effects of decision-making style (maximiser vs satisficer), tie strength (strong-tie vs weak-tie provider) and message valence (positive vs negative) on jobseekers’ perceived OA.

Practical implications

Companies seeking to increase their candidate pool should consider accommodating the different decision-making styles of jobseekers by carefully designing the content of recruitment information and utilising recruitment information sources. Although conducted in just one sector, the ubiquity of the maximiser/satisficer decision-making style implies further research to assess the implications for other sectors.

Originality/value

Research on decision-making style in recruitment is relatively limited. This study demonstrates the differences between maximisers and satisficers in terms of job-related information needs, and the evaluation of the source/content, when searching for a retail trade job.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Morna S.Y. Lee, Peter J. McGoldrick, Kathleen A. Keeling and Joanne Doherty

Telecommunications companies world‐wide are developing 3G mobile phones and applications. In the UK, mobile banking is considered to be one of the most value‐added and…

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7094

Abstract

Telecommunications companies world‐wide are developing 3G mobile phones and applications. In the UK, mobile banking is considered to be one of the most value‐added and important mobile services available. However, the adoption rate of using 3G mobile phones for financial services is yet to be determined. The current research examined both innovative attributes and customers’ perceived risk in order to understand customers’ behaviour and motivation toward this innovation. It has advanced the theoretical frameworks of innovation and customers’ risk perception as new attributes and risk dimensions were identified. The findings provide banking executives with a better understanding of what are the perceived advantages and disadvantages of 3G mobile banking services, helping them to plan marketing strategies and promotion approaches for 3G mobile banking services in the future.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

J.T. Luo, Peter McGoldrick, Susan Beatty and Kathleen A. Keeling

Previous research has focused on how trustworthiness can be evoked by the physical design of on‐screen characters (OSCs) within the e‐commerce interface. The purpose of…

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6610

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has focused on how trustworthiness can be evoked by the physical design of on‐screen characters (OSCs) within the e‐commerce interface. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether or not the OSCs representation, along with user differences, influence, how likeable, appropriate and trustworthy they are.

Design/methodology/approach

A web site was created for a simulated online bookseller and 183 people from various countries participated in the experiments. OSC representations were tested under four conditions in the main experiment: facial appearance (human‐like vs cartoon‐like) and gender (male vs female).

Findings

The results suggest that the human‐like characters are more likeable, appropriate and trustworthy in general terms. However, when perceived capabilities of OSCs are measured, a mismatch can occur between expectations and capabilities of the human‐like OSCs. In fact, cartoon‐like OSCs, especially female, had more positive effects on the web site interface.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to simulations of on‐screen scenarios. Future work, with access to the huge database required, could investigate the effects of truly interactive OSCs. Larger national sub‐samples would permit generalisations about cross‐cultural differences.

Practical implications

For e‐tailers and web designers, this study suggests critical design variables and response‐moderating variables that mediate the effects of OSCs in e‐retailing. It helps to understand customers' interaction needs in establishing and maintaining para‐social relationships, potentially increasing purchase intentions and persuasion.

Originality/value

The efficacy of different representations of OSCs to retail situations has been little investigated previously; this study measured how likeable, appropriate and trustworthy different OSC design formats are to different customer types.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Yu-Lun Liu, Kathleen A. Keeling and K. Nadia Papamichail

The purpose of this paper is to investigate differences in characteristics, job outcome experiences and attitudes of maximiser and satisficer decision-making style groups…

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1087

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate differences in characteristics, job outcome experiences and attitudes of maximiser and satisficer decision-making style groups working in the retail trade.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 140 participants who have accepted a job offer in the retail trade in the past six months in the USA was conducted on Amazon Mechanical Turk. The survey examined participants’ opinions and attitudes towards their present job and established which job information source(s) they had used to search for retail trade job-related information.

Findings

The results show that compared to satisficers, maximisers exert more effort when searching job information, have higher uncertainty avoidance and need for cognition, and experience more post-decisional regret. In this sample, any significant differences between maximisers and satisficers in relation to job satisfaction, company commitment, and intention to quit their present job are restricted to certain groups. For recruitment information sources, while satisficers rely on their families and friends for information, maximisers are more likely to obtain job-related information from other sources such as online discussion forums.

Practical implications

Even though some studies suggest that maximisers are unhappy with their choices, this research recommends that retail trade companies should not exclude maximisers from their recruitment pools. Retailers should enhance their candidate pools with both maximisers and satisficers by managing different recruitment information sources.

Originality/value

Research of decision-making style in recruitment is relatively limited. This research illustrates the differences of attitudes between maximisers and satisficers towards their present retail job, and also demonstrates the preferences of maximisers and satisficers in recruitment information sources.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1929

Criticisms of the Library Association have no value which do not take account of all the circumstances. We are told that for some years past nothing constructive for…

Abstract

Criticisms of the Library Association have no value which do not take account of all the circumstances. We are told that for some years past nothing constructive for librarianship or for its technique has been done. Our correspondent Callimachus makes this assertion by implication on another page. It must be remembered, however, that until quite recently the Library Association was a very small body which exercised an influence out of all proportion to its size and income. It has grown by direct membership and by affiliation in an extraordinary manner in the past year, a result which is due to goodwill on the part of librarians, but more immediately to the wise direction of Messrs. Jast and Savage and the untiring patience and tacful activity of Mr. Guy Keeling. Our readers know that Mr. Keeling has actually had to rest owing to the effects of overwork. This being so, it is quite clear that the demand for more must be tempered by a willingness to work on the part of the critics. The Association is only an embodiment of the membership; what the members want of the Association they must give to it.

Details

New Library World, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1928

THE influence of wireless on libraries is marked. As a method of publicity it is unmatched. On April 20th the new secretary of the Library Association, Mr. Guy Keeling

Abstract

THE influence of wireless on libraries is marked. As a method of publicity it is unmatched. On April 20th the new secretary of the Library Association, Mr. Guy Keeling, joined the number of library broadcasters with a talk from 2 LO on “What Your Public Library can do for You.” The announcer said he regarded the talk as a fresh mark of the co‐operation between the B.B.C. and the public libraries which had been so fruitful in the past; and Mr. Keeling made his first real public appearance as Secretary with a clearly Stated account of our ordinary activities, enlivened with humour, and delivered in excellent manner. Together with all those who have any vision in the matter, he looks forward to co‐operation between all libraries.

Details

New Library World, vol. 30 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Susan P. McGrath, Emily Wells, Krystal M. McGovern, Irina Perreard, Kathleen Stewart, Dennis McGrath and George Blike

Although it is widely acknowledged that health care delivery systems are complex adaptive systems, there are gaps in understanding the application of systems engineering…

Abstract

Although it is widely acknowledged that health care delivery systems are complex adaptive systems, there are gaps in understanding the application of systems engineering approaches to systems analysis and redesign in the health care domain. Commonly employed methods, such as statistical analysis of risk factors and outcomes, are simply not adequate to robustly characterize all system requirements and facilitate reliable design of complex care delivery systems. This is especially apparent in institutional-level systems, such as patient safety programs that must mitigate the risk of infections and other complications that can occur in virtually any setting providing direct and indirect patient care. The case example presented here illustrates the application of various system engineering methods to identify requirements and intervention candidates for a critical patient safety problem known as failure to rescue. Detailed descriptions of the analysis methods and their application are presented along with specific analysis artifacts related to the failure to rescue case study. Given the prevalence of complex systems in health care, this practical and effective approach provides an important example of how systems engineering methods can effectively address the shortcomings in current health care analysis and design, where complex systems are increasingly prevalent.

Details

Structural Approaches to Address Issues in Patient Safety
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-085-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1931

OWING to the comparatively early date in the year of the Library Association Conference, this number of THE LIBRARY WORLD is published so that it may be in the hands of…

Abstract

OWING to the comparatively early date in the year of the Library Association Conference, this number of THE LIBRARY WORLD is published so that it may be in the hands of our readers before it begins. The official programme is not in the hands of members at the time we write, but the circumstances are such this year that delay has been inevitable. We have dwelt already on the good fortune we enjoy in going to the beautiful West‐Country Spa. At this time of year it is at its best, and, if the weather is more genial than this weather‐chequered year gives us reason to expect, the Conference should be memorable on that account alone. The Conference has always been the focus of library friendships, and this idea, now that the Association is so large, should be developed. To be a member is to be one of a freemasonry of librarians, pledged to help and forward the work of one another. It is not in the conference rooms alone, where we listen, not always completely awake, to papers not always eloquent or cleverly read, that we gain most, although no one would discount these; it is in the hotels and boarding houses and restaurants, over dinner tables and in the easy chairs of the lounges, that we draw out really useful business information. In short, shop is the subject‐matter of conference conversation, and only misanthropic curmudgeons think otherwise.

Details

New Library World, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1928

WITH the passing of Easier the British librarian enters upon summer arrangements and a new financial year at the same time. There have been no severe complaints of undue…

Abstract

WITH the passing of Easier the British librarian enters upon summer arrangements and a new financial year at the same time. There have been no severe complaints of undue financial “cutting” from public librarians; but there has been no very lusty jubilation caused by undue amplitude in appropriations. We may be grateful that in the general Stringency matters are not worse than they are. Our time will come. As for the summer work of libraries: of late there has been a tendency for the issues, during what are usually thought to be the slacker months, to approximate to those of winter time. This is not wholly, or even largely, due to the organization of holiday literature exhibitions and similar “added” activities, but it appears to be the result of increased reading habit. At the same time it must be remembered that last summer was not an out‐door one.

Details

New Library World, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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