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Article

Katherine Trebeck

The purpose of this paper is to highlight practical manifestations of CSR and limitations of company responsiveness following these realities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight practical manifestations of CSR and limitations of company responsiveness following these realities.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical research into responsiveness of miners to Australian Indigenous communities, alongside exploration of corporate history and composition. A range of sources was utilised, including participant interviews and quantitative data. The paper begins by discussing the primacy of commercial interest in CSR, then gives an example of responsiveness. It concludes with implications for those wanting to influence corporate behaviour.

Findings

Empirical evidence generated a definition of CSR as responsiveness. The case study illustrated how the more communities influence corporate operating parameters, the more potent their demands in the eyes of management. A link to the financial bottom line is needed. In corporate response to social expectations, three factors are relevant: expectations of corporate behaviour; a shift in how communities articulate their expectations; and increased stakeholder capacity to affect corporate operations. How a company responds is, in turn, determined by conditions including culture and market pressures.

Practical implications

Unless a business benefit from responsiveness is established, companies will deploy effort and resources elsewhere. Communities must maintain vigilance, so companies are compelled to consider communities – their ability to do so is contingent on leverage over the company.

Originality/value

Setting aside the normative debate over moral responsibilities that might be applied to companies, and adopting an understanding of CSR that reflects observed patterns of action and inaction, the paper highlights corporate motivations and predicts company actions, revealing crucial parameters and levers useful for those wanting to influence corporate behaviour.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article

Kenneth Gibb and Katherine Trebeck

The purpose of this paper is to contextualise and assess “controlled” evidence about emerging plural provision of social housing within an English region.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contextualise and assess “controlled” evidence about emerging plural provision of social housing within an English region.

Design/methodology/approach

Two matching pairs of case study social housing provider type (stock transfer associations and arm's‐length management organisations), all established between four and seven years previously and all located within the same region, are compared and contrasted through rich qualitative interviews with stakeholders, backed by secondary and other documentary evidence.

Findings

The new models have led to considerable change for both staff and tenants across many dimensions, mainly positive, in service delivery terms. It is also apparent that regulation and inspection have a dominant impact on social providers. It can be inferred from the evidence that a key challenge for the future is the lack of a clear, long‐term vision for social housing at the national policy level.

Originality/value

The paper is a rare empirical examination of wide‐ranging change to social housing in the UK. It is also unusual in its attempt to construct a quasi‐experimental series of case studies.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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Book part

Morgan R. Clevenger and Cynthia J. MacGregor

This chapter explores the mindset inside companies and how they plan and interact in society. Corporate strategy and leadership are discussed. Specific models illustrate a…

Abstract

This chapter explores the mindset inside companies and how they plan and interact in society. Corporate strategy and leadership are discussed. Specific models illustrate a process of engagement including the sustainable livelihoods approach, The Partnership Continuum by Johnson (2011), Stages of Corporate Citizenship by Mirvis and Googins (2006), and Saul's (2012) social value spectrum and social innovation quartile. Finally, to illustrate best practices with highly driven corporate efforts, a case study at Campbell Soup Company in Camden, New Jersey, illuminates a broad range of perspectives and strategies that foster, manage, and report corporate practices in action.

Details

Business and Corporation Engagement with Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-656-1

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