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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Katherine S. Dabbour and James David Ballard

The purpose of the paper is to present a cross‐cultural analysis of information literacy and library use among Latino and white undergraduates in an American university.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to present a cross‐cultural analysis of information literacy and library use among Latino and white undergraduates in an American university.

Design/methodology/approach

A large‐scale, random sample survey of information literacy skills, and library instruction experiences and attitudes was undertaken at a large public university in the USA.

Findings

More white students accessed the internet from home than Latino students; however, both spent an equal amount of time searching the internet and library databases. Latino students used the physical library more than white students. More Latino than white students had formal library instruction. Over two thirds of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that their research skills contributed to their academic success. Latino students did not perform as well as white students on the test questions on information literacy knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

While an argument over the relative merits of an objective test of information literacy versus direct assessment of student work is beyond the scope of this study, it would be worthwhile to undertake to see if the results would be different.

Practical implications

Given the differences in test scores despite more Latinos attending library instruction, improvements in outreach, pedagogy, and assessment methodologies may be needed.

Social implications

As there are over 220 Hispanic‐Serving Institutions of higher education in the USA, these findings could be applicable to other libraries.

Originality/value

Few if any researchers have compared test scores on information literacy knowledge and library use based on a cross‐cultural analysis.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Jacqueline Solis and Katherine S. Dabbour

This paper aims to describe how an academic library is using federal grant money to contribute to Latino student success by strengthening library collections, archives…

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905

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe how an academic library is using federal grant money to contribute to Latino student success by strengthening library collections, archives, and information competence.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the inequalities faced by US Latinos in higher education and how the Oviatt Library at California State University Northridge is addressing this through a project funded by a Hispanic‐Serving Institutions (HSI) Program grant from the US Department of Education. The grant project has three objectives: 1) Increase students' library use by expanding the library's collection of Latino‐related materials, library instruction program, and outreach; 2) Acquire and provide access to primary archival materials related to Latino individuals and organizations in the local community; and 3) Create and administer valid and reliable information competence assessment tools.

Findings

Grant money can be an important tool for contributing to a library's ability to respond to the needs of its community.

Originality/value

This case study should encourage libraries to seek funding from sources that are not generally considered.

Details

New Library World, vol. 107 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Mary M. Somerville, Lynn D. Lampert, Katherine S. Dabbour, Sallie Harlan and Barbara Schader

The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance to those contemplating or preparing to administer a large scale information literacy assessment such as the ETS ICT…

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2470

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance to those contemplating or preparing to administer a large scale information literacy assessment such as the ETS ICT assessment instrument. The case studies and literature review provide real life examples of how to consider implementing the ETS ICT instrument with special attention to issues such as collaboration, timing, marketing, budgeting, and developing a strategy that includes a discussion of how testing results will inform campus information literacy curriculum development and programming.

Design/methodology/approach

The planning and implementation by two California State University campuses that administrated beta test versions of the ETS ICT assessment instrument are documented. Background about ICT and guidance for future administrations of large scale assessments on university and college campuses are discussed.

Findings

The paper provides background information, techniques and guidance for academic librarians contemplating future administrations and usages of large scale assessments of student information and communication technology skills, like the ETS ICT assessment. Examples of necessary planning stages and collaboration are provided as well as a discussion of the value of large scale assessments for students, campuses and information literacy programs.

Practical implications

This paper offers guidance for academic librarians and libraries interested in assessing their information literacy programs and/or working within their university to conduct a large scale assessment of student ICT literacy skills using the ETS ICT assessment instrument.

Originality/value

The strategies and ideas presented in this paper will help inform other academic libraries and librarians faced with administrating and implementing a large scale assessment instrument such as the ETS ICT instrument.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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