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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2009

Victoria Tischler, Emma Bronjewski, Katherine O'Connor and Tim Calton

We report the findings from a study exploring the experiences of individuals undergoing MRI scanning for research. Semi‐structured interviews took place before and after…

Abstract

We report the findings from a study exploring the experiences of individuals undergoing MRI scanning for research. Semi‐structured interviews took place before and after scanning with 17 participants; 12 were healthy volunteers and five were patients with a diagnosis of remitted depression. Themes of apprehension and curiosity prior to scanning were common in both groups. Patients were often confused about the procedure. Negative feelings were an issue at the outset, characterised by shock related to the physical surroundings, after which positive feelings, for example relaxation, were often experienced, and in the case of patients, learning more about their brain. Written information about imaging was deemed satisfactory; however the ability to ‘experience’ aspects of scanning beforehand was suggested. Scanning may be viewed as a process beginning prior to the procedure itself and involving positive and negative emotions. Increased information, reassurance and a more interactive intervention to reduce anxiety may be beneficial and may improve individuals' experience of this widely used procedure.

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Morell D. Boone

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Abstract

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2021

Rong Wang and Katherine R. Cooper

CSR reporting is an institutionalized practice. However, institutionalization has been primarily examined in the context of limited social issues and largely restricted to…

Abstract

Purpose

CSR reporting is an institutionalized practice. However, institutionalization has been primarily examined in the context of limited social issues and largely restricted to the presence of CSR communication. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a framework to explore how institutional and organizational factors shape CSR programming in response to an emerging social issue: the global refugee crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected corporate social responsibility (CSR) reports from Global 500 Fortune corporations between 2012 and 2017. This study uses content coding and inferential analysis to examine how industry type, headquarters location, and partnership resources are related to programming in the refugee relief efforts.

Findings

The results reveal distinctive patterns from the technology sector and European corporations, with no clear patterns identified among other corporations. The findings indicate that although CSR is an institutionalized practice, CSR program reporting offers fewer insights as to how institutionalization occurs.

Research limitations/implications

Results suggest a preliminary framework for understanding how CSR programming becomes institutionalized and provide implications for how corporations may address emerging social issues.

Originality/value

This study applies an institutional, communicative approach to the context of the recent global refugee crisis, which contributes to theory development through the examination of an emerging social issue. It also extends prior research on the institutionalization of CSR by focusing on programming in response to an emerging social issue over time and suggests the limits of prior claims of institutionalized practices.

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Journal of Communication Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2011

Pat O'Connor

This paper aims to provide a quantitative picture of the extent to which Irish universities are male-dominated at senior management, professoriate and governance levels;…

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757

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a quantitative picture of the extent to which Irish universities are male-dominated at senior management, professoriate and governance levels; to locate this pattern in an international context; and, drawing on qualitative data from a purposive sample of Irish university senior managers, to explore the limits and possibilities of change.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative data at senior management level draw on a largely web-based study, supplemented by interview data from a purposive sample of 40 people (85 per cent response rate) in senior management positions in all seven universities funded by the state – including those at Dean to Presidential level, men and women, and academics and non-academics. The interview schedule used in the qualitative study was devised by the eight-country Women in Higher Education Management Network (WHEM).

Findings

Irish universities are very male-dominated at senior management, professoriate and governance levels. The qualitative data suggest that the limits to change are an organisational culture that is homosocial and conformist, where women and their attitudes and priorities are seen as “the problem”. Yet there was a striking level of endorsement of various discourses suggesting that having women in senior management makes a difference.

Research limitations/implications

The failure of the Higher Educational Authority to collect data on the gender of those in senior management in Irish universities has necessitated the use of the web. This is an effective pragmatic response, but obviously not as satisfactory as official data.

Practical implications

It has been widely recognised that diversity in management teams is positively associated with innovation. In this context the absence of such diversity in the senior management teams in Irish universities raises concerns in the context of the challenges facing Irish society in general and the university sector in particular. The references to the organisational culture as conformist and homosocial raise fundamental questions about the universities ' ability to use the skills of their staff to move the institution forward.

Originality/value

The paper is the first specific study of senior management in Irish universities. It echoes and specifies the nature of the organisational culture – but also highlights the existence of legitimating discourses endorsed by senior managers.

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Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2012

Alexandra Kent

Purpose – This chapter examines children's options for responding to parental attempts to get them to do something (directives).Methodology/approach – The data for the…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter examines children's options for responding to parental attempts to get them to do something (directives).

Methodology/approach – The data for the study are video recordings of everyday family mealtime interactions. The study uses conversation analysis and discursive psychology to conduct a microanalysis of sequences of everyday family mealtimes interactions in which a parent issues a directive and a child responds.

Findings – It is very difficult for children to resist parental directives without initiating a dispute. Immediate embodied compliance was the interactionally preferred response option to a directive. Outright resistance was typically met with an upgraded and more forceful directive. Legitimate objections to compliance could be treated seriously but were not always taken as grounds for non-compliance.

Research implications – The results have implications for our understandings of the notions of compliance and authority. Children's status in interaction is also discussed in light of their ability to choose whether to ratify a parent's control attempt or not.

Originality/value of chapter – The chapter represents original work on the interactional structures and practices involved in responding to control attempts by a co-present participant. It offers a data-driven framework for conceptualising compliance and authority in interaction that is based on the orientations of participants rather than cultural or analytical assumptions of the researcher.

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Disputes in Everyday Life: Social and Moral Orders of Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-877-9

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Matthew Lambert and Katherine Kao Cushing

The purpose of this paper is to describe the impacts of an ecological footprint (EF) reduction campaign on the pro-environmental behavior of university students, faculty…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the impacts of an ecological footprint (EF) reduction campaign on the pro-environmental behavior of university students, faculty and staff. The campaign emphasized educating participants on specific actions that reduce resource use and the relative environmental benefit of each action.

Design/methodology/approach

This investigation used a pre-test–post-test design. At the beginning of an academic year, participants were invited to measure their baseline EF and take part in a footprint reduction campaign. At the end of the campaign, participants measured their EF again to see if they were able to reduce it by 10 per cent.

Findings

Participants in the footprint reduction campaign decreased their EF by 10 per cent. Students changed behaviors related to goods and services the most, resulting in a 16 per cent decrease in footprint for this behavior category. The most significant behavior change for faculty and staff was in the housing category with footprint reductions of 12 and 11 per cent, respectively. The most common behavioral changes in students were low- and no-cost options.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the general nature of the EF tool, estimates of resource use reduction are approximate. Data describing pro-environmental behaviors were self-reported by participants, making accuracy dependent on participant recollections.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates how providing quantitative, personalized and university-specific knowledge on the impact of personal lifestyles on natural resources can facilitate significant, measurable pro-environmental behavioral change for the entire campus community. It also provides direction on how to develop targeted sustainability campaigns for different audiences.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Abstract

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Sport, Gender and Mega-Events
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-937-6

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2014

Katherine A. Schroeder, Peter F. Sorensen and Therese F. Yaeger

Current trends such as a steadfast movement toward globalization, increased connectivity and use of networks in business relationships, rapidly changing technology…

Abstract

Current trends such as a steadfast movement toward globalization, increased connectivity and use of networks in business relationships, rapidly changing technology, increased pressure for economic profitability, and economic concern create an environment where a focus on global team effectiveness is imperative. This study provides greater clarity on the workings of global hybrid team effectiveness including an examination of accelerators and decelerators. It also proposes a new model of Global Working behaviors to be applied systematically to all McKinsey 7-S areas – Strategy, Structure, Systems, Shared Values, Style, Skills, and Staff – in order to accelerate global hybrid team effectiveness.

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Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-312-4

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2018

Katherine Najjar, Tiffani N. Luethke and Minerva D. Tuliao

This chapter discusses the challenges and support structures of MENA refugee women in their workforce transitions after resettlement in the United States. With a growing…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the challenges and support structures of MENA refugee women in their workforce transitions after resettlement in the United States. With a growing number of displaced individuals worldwide, the United States will undoubtedly continue to welcome immigrants and refugees in the coming years. While women comprise half of this population, MENA women participate in the US workforce at a far lower rate than do men from MENA. However, there is limited research examining workforce transitions for MENA refugee women once resettled. The partnerships of community stakeholders, including the education sector, non-government organizations, refugee agencies, and employers, are responsible for facilitating MENA refugee women toward self-sufficiency. Implications and suggestions for future research involving MENA refugee women are provided.

Details

Strategies, Policies, and Directions for Refugee Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-798-0

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Katherine Karl, Joy Van Eck Peluchette and Leda McIntyre Hall

The increasing prevalence of unconventional appearance attributes (e.g. tattoos, piercings, unnatural hair color, alternative clothing) is a concern among employers as…

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1052

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing prevalence of unconventional appearance attributes (e.g. tattoos, piercings, unnatural hair color, alternative clothing) is a concern among employers as these appearance attributes are often viewed negatively. Because much of the existing employee appearance research has been conducted in the USA, the purpose of this paper is to examine employee beliefs regarding the impact of unconventional employee appearance on customer perceptions of service quality in Mexico and Turkey. The authors also examine the impact of gender, age, and position level.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 295 white collar employees in various service industries in Turkey and Mexico. Respondents reported how they thought eight employee appearance factors (tattoos, facial piercings, unconventional hair color, unconventional hair styles, sweat pants, clothing with rips or tears, clothing that bears midriffs, belly-buttons, or cleavage, and uniforms) would affect customer perceptions of service quality.

Findings

Employees in both Mexico and Turkey indicated that uniforms would have a positive impact on customer perceptions of service quality and all seven unconventional employee appearance attributes would have a negative impact. Significant differences for country, gender, age, and position level were also found.

Research limitations/implications

Future research including a more diverse group of countries and cultures is needed. Future research should also attempt to control for differences in type of organization, organizational culture, and job type.

Practical implications

Alternative fashion and appearance styles may be trendy but there are risks in how these might be perceived by customers and by colleagues at work.

Originality/value

This study examines employee beliefs regarding the impact of a variety of unconventional employee appearance attributes on customers’ perceptions of service quality in Mexico and Turkey.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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