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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2008

Katherine M. Fodchuk and Heather D. Sherman

Increasing diversity of the global workforce calls for research that guides the implementation of culturally sensitive employment procedures. Performance evaluations are…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasing diversity of the global workforce calls for research that guides the implementation of culturally sensitive employment procedures. Performance evaluations are often used to support potentially contentious workplace decisions and little research examines the impact of employee participation on fairness perceptions across cultures. The purpose of this paper is to examine the variation between American and French performance evaluations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines American and French employees’ fairness perceptions for their performance evaluations. The focus was on cross‐cultural variation in instrumental and non‐instrumental voice processes by testing Shapiro's model of procedural justice.

Findings

Support was found for the hypothesis that voice would operate predominantly via non‐instrumental processes (e.g. interpersonally responsive behaviors from the evaluator) for the French and partial support that voice influences procedural justice through a combination of non‐instrumental and instrumental processes (perceptions of decision influence) for Americans.

Research limitations/implications

Findings which indicated that French voice appeared to be tied more directly to status‐affirming non‐instrumental processes were supported by Lind and Tyler's relational model of authority and research surrounding the influence of status differentials in participative decision‐making.

Practical implications

Research implications for the design of culturally‐sensitive performance evaluations that take into account fairness perceptions are presented.

Originality/value

The paper indicates that voice expectations and processes are not culturally universal and should be considered in the design of employment practices.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2018

Dilek G. Yunlu, Hong Ren, Katherine Mohler Fodchuk and Margaret Shaffer

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model that examines the influences of expatriate community relationship building behaviors on community embeddedness and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model that examines the influences of expatriate community relationship building behaviors on community embeddedness and community embeddedness on expatriate retention cognitions. The authors further investigate the moderating role of organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from 127 expatriates in the USA were collected and analyzed. The authors used multiple (moderator) hierarchical regression analyses to test the hypotheses. In addition, simple slopes analyses were conducted to further understand the interaction effects.

Findings

The results demonstrate that community relationship building behaviors positively influence expatriate community embeddedness, and the latter is associated with stronger retention cognitions. In addition, the paper finds that, for individuals who have lower levels of organizational identification, community embeddedness is particularly important.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on cross-sectional and self-report data, which limits the ability to draw definitive conclusions about causality. Thus, more multi-source and longitudinal data from different expatriate populations would increase the validity and the generalizability of findings. The theory and empirical evidence indicate the importance of community embeddedness, particularly when organizational identification is low, for expatriates’ retention cognitions.

Practical implications

This study examines the important role of community relationship building behaviors on community embeddedness, and the role of community embeddedness in expatriates’ intention to stay.

Originality/value

This paper integrates the unique view of personal resources associated with different social contexts (i.e. community and organizational contexts) in expatriate studies.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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