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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Kate Varini, Pavan Sirsi and Sarah Kamensky

Revenue management has grown in popularity and is now a widely accepted discipline that has brought about significant improvements to businesses worldwide. With…

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Abstract

Purpose

Revenue management has grown in popularity and is now a widely accepted discipline that has brought about significant improvements to businesses worldwide. With globalisation in recent times, there is now space for international hotels, fast food restaurants, automobile companies and other brands to offer their products in India. Educating people who are going to be part of such a process is a huge challenge. The aim of this paper is to present some of the challenges businesses and communities have to overcome.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses secondary sources to explore possible approaches to rapidly stimulate the uptake of revenue management through partnerships between hospitality and tourism businesses.

Findings

A growing middle class population and access to better education presents an opportunity to build a wider range of profitable services. Global brands with already established revenue management practices are in a position to share skills and knowledge with new and smaller players. Partnerships will be essential to rapidly and effectively develop the skills and knowledge required, starting with those in educational fields where the resources are already in place.

Originality/value

Revenue management has not been deployed widely in India. Being able to learn from the early adopters would allow Indian firms to leapfrog over issues and barriers, thus implementing practices more rapidly and effectively.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Simon Webb, Kevin Nield and Kate Varini

Culture has become accepted as an important and constitutive element in the domain of business management. A great deal of research has been undertaken on the nature and…

Abstract

Culture has become accepted as an important and constitutive element in the domain of business management. A great deal of research has been undertaken on the nature and effect of corporate culture and a limited amount of research has examined the conflict between corporate and national culture. However, the concept of an industry culture as a third element in this scenario and the notion of ethnocentrism has only recently been introducted into the business sphere. The expanding body of knowledge on the impact of culture and ethnocentrism on business has led to improvements in organisational structure, labour relations, customer relations, productivity and profitability. The concept of hospitality is particularly culture bound but the hypothesis that the hotel industry (as a central component of the hospitality industry) and the provision of alcoholic drinks, as a strong industry culture has never been tested. Nor has it been questioned whether this industry culture can conflict with the worldview and accepted norms of communities around the world that have a different culture setting. It is the purpose of this paper to give an analysis of culture and ethnocentrism applied to the provision of alcoholic beverages within the hotel industry in Durban, South Africa. The main sources of data for the paper are objective observation of the position and posture of the four and five star hotels in the Durban Metropolitan Region and structured interviews conducted with the General Managers of these establishments.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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