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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Kathleen Collett and Kate Shoesmith

506

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Paul Jones, Christopher Miller, David Pickernell and Gary Packham

Purpose – The objective of this paper is to examine the initiation of the University of the Heads of the Valley Initiative (UHOVI) project and evaluate the development of…

1575

Abstract

Purpose – The objective of this paper is to examine the initiation of the University of the Heads of the Valley Initiative (UHOVI) project and evaluate the development of its focus, materials and structure. Design/methodology/approach – The methodology employs interviews with a purposive sample of local employer stakeholders. The rationale for this approach is that it allows identification of the key requirements that UHOVI will need to fulfil if it is to be successful in this endeavour, within a reasonable timeframe. The in‐depth interviews also allow increased clarity in terms of the conclusions that can be drawn, particularly in terms of the recommendations for the next stages of UHOVI project. Findings – UHOVI's aim is to encourage social inclusion, through vocational education and training programmes explicitly suited to non‐traditional learners in an area of high social deprivation. UHOVI is a strategic partnership backed by the Welsh Assembly Government and the European Social Fund, between the University of Glamorgan and University of Wales, Newport. The purpose of the project is to alleviate the long‐term problems inherent within the Valleys area of Wales, which include low levels of professional and managerial jobs, limited qualifications and educational progression and high levels of economic inactivity, sickness and disability. Practical implications – This study can also act as a case study for other similar policies undertaken in similar economic geographies in the future. It also provides an important and original insight into the underpinning design of a large scale social inclusion educational project which will be of interest to policy makers, academia and enterprise support agencies. Originality/value – The paper provides an in‐depth study of the significant UHOVI project, examining the requirements for such an initiative in terms of both content and delivery of vocational education, and how this can affect the role that an education and training programme can play in meeting a social inclusion agenda.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Zoharah Omar, Steven Eric Krauss, Rahim M. Sail and Ismi Arif Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to explore objective and subjective career success and to identify factors contributing to career success among a sample of technical and…

1991

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore objective and subjective career success and to identify factors contributing to career success among a sample of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) “late bloomers” working in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Incorporating a mixed method design, the authors quantitatively surveyed 86 TVET graduates from two multinational companies, followed by in‐depth qualitative interviews with five high‐performing “late bloomer” TVET graduates.

Findings

Quantitative results indicate that the respondents progressed in their careers both in terms of salary and promotions, while most were satisfied with their careers and felt that they were internally and externally marketable. Qualitative findings indicate that the success of the late bloomers was the result of a perceived good fit between an individual's strengths and the organization's ability to compensate, motivate and support the individuals in their career progression.

Research limitations/implications

The limited sample size employed can only provide initial insights into career success levels and contributing factors of career success. The results may spur larger scale research on career success of TVET graduates in Malaysia and the neighbouring region.

Practical implications

The paper provides important initial findings on the technical and vocational career line as an alternative pathway for Malaysian youth, particularly school leavers and underachievers, to achieve career success and enhanced social inclusion through higher salaries, job status and educational attainment.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the unexplored potential of career success as a facilitator of educational attainment and social inclusion, rather than the traditional path of educational attainment first, followed by career success.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Viviana Sappa and Laura Bonica

This study aims to deal with the role of vocational training in developing social inclusion by analyzing the school‐to‐work transitional outcomes of early school leavers…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to deal with the role of vocational training in developing social inclusion by analyzing the school‐to‐work transitional outcomes of early school leavers whose successful experience in vocational training was documented in previous works.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprises 126 males who enrolled in and successfully completed biennial vocational training courses soon after dropping out of school. The transitional outcomes one year after the qualification as well as the variability of these outcomes in relation to age, degree of success in vocational training, and achievement in the previous schools were analyzed. A phone interview was used to collect data, and a binary logistic regression analysis was applied. In addition, narrative materials were collected through biographical interviews and qualitatively analyzed.

Findings

Although most subjects obtained a stable job, some critical aspects emerged: at times employment seemed to be the result of a “negative compromise”; several constraints emerged in managing further personal investment in school and learning.

Research limitations/implications

Results support the usefulness of studying social inclusion by adopting a transitional perspective. The main limitations concern the focus on just a few variables that only partially explain the different outcomes.

Practical implications

Findings suggested the need for greater flexibility among school, vocational training, and the world of work in order to promote effective social and professional inclusion through the VET system.

Originality/value

The paper's results indicate that developing social inclusion of early school leavers inevitably demands a transformation in the widespread beliefs about the dichotomy between learning and work.

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Erica Smith and Andy Smith

The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether the availability of qualifications through work‐based traineeships in Australia assists social inclusion.

1036

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether the availability of qualifications through work‐based traineeships in Australia assists social inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

Industry case studies, of the finance and cleaning industries, were undertaken as part of a national research project on quality in traineeships. The two industry case studies were analysed to provide data on social inclusion aspects. A general discussion on the “pros” and “cons” of gaining qualifications through work, from a social inclusion point of view, is included.

Findings

The industry case studies show many advantages of work‐based qualifications for people who have had disadvantaged economic and social backgrounds. The study presents a model showing how work‐based qualifications help to meet the twin social inclusion goals of employment and education. However in economic hard times, the need to have a job may rule out some people. Also, some doubts about quality in work‐based delivery may mean that qualifications gained through work may be of lower value than those gained at least partly through formal study.

Research limitations/implications

The models put forward are tentative, based on the findings in the research study that has been described and the authors’ earlier research. Further research is necessary to establish the social inclusion benefits of this means of gaining qualifications. In particular longitudinal research with disadvantaged people who have gained qualifications through this route is needed to evaluate whether their completion of qualifications through employment has assisted their broader economic and social engagement, and in what ways. In addition, research is needed to compare the quality and utility of qualifications gained through work and those through education providers as a poor‐quality qualification may be of limited long‐term use to an individual.

Practical implications

Work‐based qualifications are shown to be a useful investment of public resources. The research also analyses some shortcomings of this method of gaining qualifications so that they can be addressed by employers and training providers.

Social implications

The research establishes the social inclusion utility of work‐based qualifications, providing insights useful for education systems and social welfare organisations.

Originality/value

This is one of very few scholarly studies of the large‐scale use of work‐based qualifications.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Patrick Lim, Sinan Gemici, John Rice and Tom Karmel

The aim of this paper is to compare the performance of area‐based vs individual‐level measures of socioeconomic status (SES).

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to compare the performance of area‐based vs individual‐level measures of socioeconomic status (SES).

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the longitudinal surveys of Australian youth (LSAY), a multidimensional measure of individual SES is created. This individual measure is used to benchmark the relative usefulness of socio‐economic indexes for areas (SEIFA), a geographic set of measures often used in Australia to assess the SES of individuals. Both measures are compared in terms of classification bias. The effects of using the different SES measures on participation in post‐compulsory education are examined.

Findings

SEIFA measures perform satisfactorily with regard to the aggregate measurement of SES. However, they perform poorly when their use is aimed at channelling resources toward disadvantaged individuals. It is at the individual level that the analysis reveals the shortcomings of area‐based SES measures.

Research limitations/implications

While region based measures are relatively easy to collect and utilise, we suggest that they hide significant SES heterogeneity within regional districts. Hence, the misclassification resulting from the use of regional measures to direct support for low SES groups creates a risk for resource misallocations.

Originality/value

The finding that region‐based measures are subject to significant misclassification has important research and policy implications. Given the increasing availability of individual‐level administrative data, the paper suggests that such data be used as a substitute for geographic SES measures in categorising the SES of individuals.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Martin McCracken

505

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 21 February 2011

Margaret Flynn

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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