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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Sonay Kaygalak-Celebi, Sehriban Kaya, Emir Ozeren and Ebru Gunlu-Kucukaltan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the authentic experiences and sense-making processes of LGBTQ+ participants of Amsterdam Pride as well as their bodily and spatial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the authentic experiences and sense-making processes of LGBTQ+ participants of Amsterdam Pride as well as their bodily and spatial interactions that arise during the festival.

Design/methodology/approach

By taking a critical, poststructuralist stance on pride festivals and drawing on 40 in-depth interviews and participant observation, the data are subjected to an inductive, qualitative, thematic content analysis for key themes.

Findings

Amsterdam Pride provides distinct spaces for LGBTQ+ individuals to express their carnivalesque bodily practices freely. While Pride offers an existential authentic experience by creating spaces for LGBTQ+ individuals where they can be themselves, the participants exhibit their “authentic” identities freely only within limited time and space that are not separated from the heteronormative order. Pride is increasingly perceived by LGBTQ+ participants as an arena for demonstrating their “normality”. Thus, the paper “signposts” greater political tensions between the queer movement and growing normalisation/citizenship trends among LGBTQ+ individuals.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a growing body of knowledge around issues of LGBTQ+ identities within the context of an oppressive heteronormative social order. It also reinforces the need for pride festivals for embracing queer, disruptive, sexually dissident expressions of identity as well as continuing transgressive and sexually dissident spaces. This study fills a significant void in the mainstream festival and event management literature and contributes to the theoretical development of festival and critical tourism research by identifying aspects of LGBTQ+ tourists’ authentic experiences at Amsterdam Pride.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Ray Oakey and Gary Cook

A broad range of policy evaluations below is begun in Chapter 2 by Kate Johnston, Colette Henry and Simon Gillespie in their evaluation entitled ‘Encouraging Research and…

Abstract

A broad range of policy evaluations below is begun in Chapter 2 by Kate Johnston, Colette Henry and Simon Gillespie in their evaluation entitled ‘Encouraging Research and Development in Ireland's Biotechnology Enterprises’. This investigation critically evaluates Irish government policy towards biotechnology development over a preceding 10-year period. In Chapter 3, Anthony Ward, Sarah Cooper, Frank Cave and William Lucas examine ‘The Effect of Industrial Experience on Entrepreneurial Intent and Self-Efficacy in UK Engineering Undergraduates’ in a large-scale study that generally produces satisfactory results in terms of raising the profile of entrepreneurship among undergraduates. Deirdre Hunt, in Chapter 4, again focuses on the evolution of strategy in Ireland, this time towards the more general topic of new firm formation with a personal contribution entitled ‘Now You See Them — Now You Don’t: Paradoxes in Enterprise Development Strategy: The Case of the Disappearing Academic Start-Ups’.

Details

New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-0805-5448-8

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Kate Johnston, Colette Henry and Simon Gillespie

Biotechnology is now considered a key emerging sector in Ireland's economic landscape. Defined as the ‘application of scientific and engineering principles to the…

Abstract

Biotechnology is now considered a key emerging sector in Ireland's economic landscape. Defined as the ‘application of scientific and engineering principles to the processing of materials by biological agents’ (Forfás Report, 2005), biotechnology is now the main high-technology driver affecting industries as diverse as food, agriculture human health and environmental protection. In 2002 it was estimated that over 400,000 people worldwide were employed in biotech (InterTradeIreland, 2002), with the market for biotechnology products worth an estimated 100 billion (European Commission, 2002). However, according to the Technology Foresight Ireland Report (1999), these figures are predicted to increase significantly, with the expectation that, by the end of 2006, the biotechnology sector will be worth an estimated 250 billion and will employ more than three million workers.

Details

New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-0805-5448-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Diarmuid De Faoite, Colette Henry, Kate Johnston and Peter van der Sijde

Increasingly, academics, practitioners and governments recognise the need to examine the role and effectiveness of entrepreneurship training and support. Studies to date…

Abstract

Increasingly, academics, practitioners and governments recognise the need to examine the role and effectiveness of entrepreneurship training and support. Studies to date have examined the importance of training and other skill development opportunities in promoting entrepreneurship in the context of different sectors, regions and countries. An important theme to emerge from the research is the failure of some programmes to take on board the cultural, educational and social background of the “entrepreneurs”, leading to ineffective training and support. This paper investigates the effectiveness of training and support initiatives for entrepreneurs in Ireland and The Netherlands, examining the experiences of 57 entrepreneurs from the services, manufacturing and high technology sectors in Ireland and The Netherlands. The results highlight the value of non‐formal support structures, such as mentoring and networking, and question the value of traditional formal business education and training strategies.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Valerie O'Connor, Angela Hamouda, Helen McKeon, Colette Henry and Kate Johnston

The purpose of this research is to discuss the nature of co‐entrepreneurs (i.e. those companies that have a mixture of male and female founding members) within the ICT…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to discuss the nature of co‐entrepreneurs (i.e. those companies that have a mixture of male and female founding members) within the ICT sector in Ireland. For the purposes of this paper, the term “co‐entrepreneurship” is used to describe male and female business partnerships. The characteristics of co‐entrepreneurs; their educational, skills and family backgrounds; their current role in the company, and the nature of the team founder structure are examined. A discussion on why the team approach was selected is also included. Other issues explored in the paper include the shareholding percentage of the co‐entrepreneurs and the extent to which the business has a lead entrepreneur.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2003 the authors compiled a database of 1,026 indigenous ICT companies, which were electronically surveyed for information regarding software production, ownership of company and gender of founding members. A total of 24 per cent (81) of the responding companies from this survey indicated that there was a mixture of male and female founding members. These companies were subsequently sent another survey designed to gather information on company background, profiles of co‐entrepreneurs, co‐entrepreneurs' motivational factors and co‐entrepreneurs' roles. A total of 34 (43 per cent) of the companies responded, of which 23 were suitable for the research.

Findings

The findings of the study indicate that the family business or spouse/partner structure represents a major component of mixed gender companies in the ICT sector in Ireland, and that such companies tend to be small, with well‐educated and experienced founders.

Originality/value

A particularly interesting contribution of this paper is the provision of insights into the co‐entrepreneurial partnership through identifying the key differences between the male and female co‐founders. A key conclusion of the study is that there would appear to be a recognition among co‐entrepreneurs that complementary skills and knowledge are critically important in the exploitation of new business opportunities, especially in the IT industry.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Diarmuid De Faoite, Colette Henry, Kate Johnston and Peter van der Sijde

A growing body of academic research has examined the effectiveness of entrepreneurship training and support initiatives, with recent studies focusing on the provision of…

Abstract

A growing body of academic research has examined the effectiveness of entrepreneurship training and support initiatives, with recent studies focusing on the provision of training and other skills development opportunities. An important theme that has emerged from this work is the failure of many programmes and initiatives to take on board the particular needs of the entrepreneurs in developing training and support systems. By extending research in this area, this article considers the importance of education and training to the economy and focuses on the particular value of entrepreneurship education and training. Some of the fundamental themes in the literature are reviewed, including the difficulties involved in categorising entrepreneurship education and training; the issue of whether or not entrepreneurship can be taught; the content of entrepreneurship programmes and the cultural and evaluative considerations. The article discusses and compares training and support provision for entrepreneurs in Ireland and The Netherlands.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 45 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Helen McKeon, Kate Johnston and Colette Henry

Entrepreneurial learning has recently become a topic of significant interest, with academics and economists alike recognising that the success of any new business venture…

Abstract

Entrepreneurial learning has recently become a topic of significant interest, with academics and economists alike recognising that the success of any new business venture is closely linked to the learning and knowledge of the entrepreneur. To date, research into entrepreneurial learning and the specific ways in which entrepreneurs learn is severally limited. By way of extending research in this area, this study examines the role of multinational companies (MNCs) as an important source of learning for entrepreneurs, and as a catalyst for new business creation and growth. Based on a small‐scale qualitative study of a group of indigenous entrepreneurs in the information technology sector in Ireland, this paper presents evidence consistent with the argument that multinational enterprises provide an important source of learning for mall to medium‐sized enterprise entrepreneurs. The evidence suggests that MNCs have a positive impact at the firm level, both at the formation and growth stage of development.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 46 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Abstract

Details

New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-0805-5448-8

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2017

Leanne Townsend and Claire Wallace

Over the past decade, the number of people engaging with social media has grown rapidly. This means that social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook are…

Abstract

Over the past decade, the number of people engaging with social media has grown rapidly. This means that social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook are potentially good sources of rich, naturally occurring data. As a result, a growing number of researchers are utilizing these platforms for the collection of data on any number of topics. To date, no consistent approach to the ethics of using social media data has been provided to researchers in this sphere. This chapter presents research that has developed an ethics framework for the use of researchers working with social media data. The chapter also presents the framework itself and guidance on how to use the framework when conducting social media research. A full report can be accessed on: http://www.abdn.ac.uk/socsci/research/new-europe-centre/information-societies-projects-225.php

Details

The Ethics of Online Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-486-6

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Candida G. Brush, Patricia G. Greene and Friederike Welter

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief history of the evolution of the Diana Project and the Diana International Research Conference. The authors examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief history of the evolution of the Diana Project and the Diana International Research Conference. The authors examine the impact of the publications, conferences and research contributions and consider key factors in the success of this collaborative research organization. They discuss the ongoing legacy, suggesting ways to extend this into the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an historical narrative and a citation analysis.

Findings

The Diana Project was founded by five women professors in 1999 with the purpose of investigating women’s access to growth capital. Following a series of academic articles, and numerous presentations, the first Diana International Conference was held in Stockholm, Sweden. At this convening, 20 scholars from 13 countries shared their knowledge of women’s entrepreneurship, venture creation and growth, culminating in the first volume of the Diana Book Series. Since then, 14 international conferences have been held, resulting in 10 special issues of top academic journals and 11 books. More than 600 scholars have attended or participated in Diana conferences or publications.

Research limitations/implications

Contributions from the Diana International Conferences’ special issues of journals and books have advanced theory across topics, levels, geographies and methods. Articles emerging from Diana scholars are some of the top contributions about women’s entrepreneurship and gender to the field of entrepreneurship. Future research directions are included.

Practical implications

This analysis demonstrates the success of a unique woman-focused collaborative research initiative and identifies key success factors, suggesting how these might be expanded in the future.

Social implications

To date, more than 600 scholars have participated in the Diana International Conferences or publications. Diana is the only community dedicated to rigorous and relevant research about gender and women’s entrepreneurship. Going forward, efforts to expand work on education for women’s entrepreneurship, women entrepreneurship faculty and careers, and women entrepreneurs, gender and policy will take place to extend this legacy.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in that it is the first to show the substantial legacy and impact of the Diana project since its inception in 1999. Further, it demonstrates how a feminist approach to entrepreneurial principles can yield insights about this unique research initiative and collaborative organization.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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