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Article

Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Kate D'Arcy and Roma Thomas

A number of reports on child sexual exploitation (CSE) have pointed to the importance of community awareness raising as a preventative measure, a means of extending the…

Abstract

Purpose

A number of reports on child sexual exploitation (CSE) have pointed to the importance of community awareness raising as a preventative measure, a means of extending the reach of CSE services and widening the scope of social responsibility to protect children. However, little has been said about how to undertake such activities; how to do this well and the potential pitfalls to avoid. The purpose of this paper is to draw out critical questions about the notion of community and highlight what can be learnt from historical debates about multiculturalist practice. While the paper does not focus solely on ethnic minority communities, the authors do take stock of pertinent points from that literature in relation to issues of engagement, power and representation and applicable learning for awareness raising around CSE. In the second half of the paper, the authors consider the issue of awareness raising within communities. The authors draw on the limited literature on community awareness raising in CSE, contextualising this with reference to relevant learning from other pertinent bodies of work, to reflect on implications for practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper based on a review of various bodies of literature. The first half reviews the literature about community, community engagement, and multiculturalism as policy and practice. The second half draws evidence from the literature on forms of awareness raising on CSE and other sensitive social issues to discuss implications for practice arising from the authors’ reflections on the literature.

Findings

The review produces three key findings. First, the need to transfer historic insights into the limits of “community” and multiculturalism and apply these to the emergent field of CSE. Second, despite theoretical distinctions between “community” and “society”, evidence from the literature suggests that the term “community” is being applied more generally to refer to a wide range of events and practices. Third, the authors conclude with some points about what may work well for CSE professionals developing work in this field; that is, clear aims and objectives, nuanced approaches and targeted messages.

Research limitations/implications

This is an under-researched area where there are currently no published evaluations of community awareness raising interventions for CSE. Effective evidence-based strategies for engaging communities are urgently needed for CSE prevention work to be extended in positive ways which protect those affected.

Originality/value

This paper is original in drawing insights from historical debates about multiculturalist practice to inform thinking on community awareness raising on CSE. It makes a valuable contribution by bringing together insights from a number of distinct bodies of literature in ways which can inform practice.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article

THE New Year should be one of much progress in the organization of Librarianship. We wish our readers all the pleasure and prosperity that may come from increasing…

Abstract

THE New Year should be one of much progress in the organization of Librarianship. We wish our readers all the pleasure and prosperity that may come from increasing activity and growing public esteem. Every year we are able to record some progress in the general estimate in which the work of libraries is held; we have not reached, and do not even approximate, to the efficiency and perfect service that we desire to attain and to render; but we believe that the library movement is on the right road.

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New Library World, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

FINANCIAL fears are only less cruel than those of war, and lead men into extravagances which they would repudiate indignantly in their cooler moments. If the doings of the…

Abstract

FINANCIAL fears are only less cruel than those of war, and lead men into extravagances which they would repudiate indignantly in their cooler moments. If the doings of the Economy Committee at Manchester in relation to children's libraries, as described in the article by Mr. Lamb in our last issue, are true, we have in them an example of a kind of retrenchment at the expense of the young which we hope is without parallel and will have no imitators. Some reduc‐tion of estimates we hear of from this or that place, but in few has the stupid policy which urges that if we spend nothing we shall all become rich been carried into full effect. Libraries always have suffered in times of crisis, whatever they are; we accept that, though doubtfully; but we do know that the people need libraries.

Details

New Library World, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Ann Marie Wood

Explores the extent of employee surveillance in the western world and queries why the USA uses surveillance measures to a greater extent than other developed nations…

Abstract

Explores the extent of employee surveillance in the western world and queries why the USA uses surveillance measures to a greater extent than other developed nations. Suggests that American managers choose surveillance methods which include the control of workers’ bodies in the production process. Lists the batteries of tests and monitoring to which US employees can now be subjected – including searching employee computer files, voice/e‐mail, monitoring telephone calls, drug tests, alcohol tests, criminal record checks, lie detector and handwriting tests. Notes also the companies which are opposed to worker and consumer privacy rights. Pinpoints the use of surveillance as a means to ensure that employees do not withold production. Reports that employees dislike monitoring and that it may adversely affect their performance and productivity. Argues that Americans like to address complex social problems with technological means, there are no data protection laws in the USA, and that these two factors, combined with the “employment‐at‐will” doctrine, have all contributed to make it possible (and easy) for employers to use technological surveillance of their workforce. Outlines some of the ways employers insist on the purification of workers’ bodies.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 18 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

George A. Heckman, Lauren Crutchlow, Veronique Boscart, Loretta Hillier, Bryan Franco, Linda Lee, Frank Molnar, Dallas Seitz and Paul Stolee

Many countries are developing primary care collaborative memory clinics (PCCMCs) to address the rising challenge of dementia. Previous research suggests that quality…

Abstract

Purpose

Many countries are developing primary care collaborative memory clinics (PCCMCs) to address the rising challenge of dementia. Previous research suggests that quality assurance should be a foundational element of an integrated system of dementia care. The purpose of this paper is to understand physicians’ and specialists’ perspectives on such a system and identify barriers to its implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used interviews and a constructivist framework to understand the perspectives on a quality assurance framework for dementia care and barriers to its implementation from ten primary care and ten specialist physicians affiliated with PCCMCs.

Findings

Interviewees found that the framework reflects quality dementia care, though most could not relate quality assurance to clinical practice. Quality assurance was viewed as an imposition on practitioners rather than as a measure of system integration. Disparities in resources among providers were seen as barriers to quality care. Greater integration with specialists was seen as a potential quality improvement mechanism. Standardized electronic medical records were seen as important to support both quality assurance and clinical care.

Practical implications

This work identified several challenges to the implementation of a quality assurance framework to support an integrated system of dementia care. Clinicians require education to better understand quality assurance. Additional challenges include inadequate resources, a need for closer collaboration between specialists and PCCMCs, and a need for a standardized electronic medical record.

Originality/value

Greater health system integration is necessary to provide quality dementia care, and quality assurance could be considered a foundational element driving system integration.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

The result of our enquiries (see April issue Library World) as to the present storage of local documents in Public Libraries or Museums, and the existing arrangements…

Abstract

The result of our enquiries (see April issue Library World) as to the present storage of local documents in Public Libraries or Museums, and the existing arrangements therein for their preservation is somewhat disappointing. Some librarians have not replied, and some give scanty information.

Details

New Library World, vol. 2 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

The staffing of the county libraries proceeds apace and all kinds of appointments are reported. It is rumoured that a retired army man has been selected in one case and a…

Abstract

The staffing of the county libraries proceeds apace and all kinds of appointments are reported. It is rumoured that a retired army man has been selected in one case and a school teacher in another, both of whom, without special library experience, will be entrusted with the organisation of their respective library schemes. It is further reported that a discussion among Directors of Education brought forth the opinion that trained men were not necessary on these jobs, “men of commonsense” being preferred.

Details

New Library World, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

We feel that librarians may congratulate themselves upon the growing sureness of the position of the Library in the life of the community. One of the legacies of the Great…

Abstract

We feel that librarians may congratulate themselves upon the growing sureness of the position of the Library in the life of the community. One of the legacies of the Great War, or, at any rate, one of the conditions clearly discernible in post‐war days, is an increased intellectual inquisitiveness in the people. There have been those who prophesied that first the Cinema, and then Wireless, would tend to reduce the use of books, even to the vanishing point. No prophesy has been more false. Either the nation's mental appetite has absorbed these new things and like Oliver Twist wants “more,” or these things themselves have been incitements to further reading. The cause is obscure, but the facts are plain enough, and these prove that in every town where the library provision is reasonably adequate, the increase in the issue of books is little less than phenomenal.

Details

New Library World, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Sidney Jay Levy

This autobiography sums up the life story of one of the contributors to the history of inquiry and instruction in the field of marketing, with special attention to the…

Abstract

Purpose

This autobiography sums up the life story of one of the contributors to the history of inquiry and instruction in the field of marketing, with special attention to the historical developments that have influenced the study of consumer behavior and the concept of branding.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an autobiographical essay, a personal history.

Findings

The reminiscence illustrates the way life experiences evolve, showing the interaction among personal growth, education, career choices and work experience that led to Professor Levy’s contributions to the field of marketing education and its research literature.

Originality/value

The paper describes a unique life, and an unusual explication of the personal life sources of influential ideas. It is novel in its large perspective and integrative narrative, and the unusual exposure of its various conceptual issues and links. It should be of interest to marketing historians, managers and scholars of marketing education.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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