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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Kasim Randeree and Nadeem Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to examine social sustainability effectiveness of eco-cities through the case of Masdar City’s strategy for urban sustainability in Abu Dhabi…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine social sustainability effectiveness of eco-cities through the case of Masdar City’s strategy for urban sustainability in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach, the paper is an exploratory, qualitative analysis, which investigates the social, environmental and economic performance of Masdar City, a purported carbon-neutral, zero-waste urban development.

Findings

Though Masdar City substantively contributes to innovation in sustainable urban development within environmental and economic contexts and has been effective in capital circulation in green technology markets, the impetus as a commercially driven enterprise is most evident. Successful sustainable urban development requires greater consideration for the social imperative.

Practical implications

Eco-city mega-projects, such as Masdar City, have the potential to fuse achievements in innovation, technology and economic enterprise with the social imperative of functional urban habitats.

Originality/value

Eco-cities are of increasing interest given the growing need for sustainable, energy-efficient living. This paper contributes through a novel case study, exploring how the concept of the eco-city has been developed and understood in the Masdar City context and discusses successes and deficits in its strategic implementation.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Kasim Randeree

The purpose of this paper is to investigate challenges in balancing interoperability, food quality and customer satisfaction in halal food supply chains.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate challenges in balancing interoperability, food quality and customer satisfaction in halal food supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed ethnography and grounded theory research methodologies. Research methods were ethnographic content analysis and document content analysis. The research framework encompassed a range of stakeholder groups connected with the halal food supply chain in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), focussing on Islamic jurisprudence, halal food sector analysis, import regulation compliance, halal food certification (HFC), food production, retailing and consumption.

Findings

The research found that supply chain intermediaries are challenged in balancing interoperability issues around non-unified global certification standards. Consequent variability in customer confidence in halal standards was found.

Research limitations/implications

This research focussed on the internal supply chain in the UAE, with future scope in HFC systems among external supplier nations and wider market research on customer perceptions of halal food integrity.

Practical implications

Transferability of the findings is high; to other halal food markets in particular, as well as supply chain systems for halal products across other Islamic economy sectors, notably halal pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Aligning the halal ecosystem with trends in healthy eating and environmentalism is also considered.

Originality/value

The paper uniquely explores the halal food sector from the perspective of variant stakeholder disciplines in halal sector governance and operation. It exposes vulnerabilities in halal supply chains in a nation with one of the most demanding and diverse agri-food supply systems in the world.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2019

Kasim Randeree

The purpose of this paper is to analyse three drivers of the Islamic economy: global Muslim demography; operational sectors and demand; and faith-based consumerism.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse three drivers of the Islamic economy: global Muslim demography; operational sectors and demand; and faith-based consumerism.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper follows a constructivist approach to the Islamic economy, undertaken through an exploratory study of global Muslim population, the growth in opportunities in the Islamic economy and plurality of religious thought across the diaspora.

Findings

The research finds four trends (t) positively impacting the growth of the Islamic economy: (t1) above-nominal increase in global Muslim population, with greater intra-religious interactions of varying Muslim cultures; (t2) an increasing demand for a diversity of Shari’ah-compliant and halal products and services; (t3) improving socio-economic status of Muslims in developed and emerging countries; and (t4) a widening perspective of faith understanding and rising interest in religious literacy.

Research limitations/implications

This research serves to inform global businesses of opportunities in Islamic economy sectors, highlighting global demographic change and informing how business is impacted through the plurality of Muslim faith interpretation.

Practical implications

Based on this research, businesses can better align their services with the socio-economic environment and faith sensibilities of Muslim consumers.

Originality/value

The paper provides a first look at the activity across Islamic economic sectors and disaggregates their activity and potential for growth across Muslim-majority and Muslim-minority markets. In particular, three areas were examined – demography, emergent Muslim lifestyles and religiosity.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Kasim Randeree

Strategies for teaching engineering in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) have been evolving over the past decades due to innovations in technology, as well as the development…

Abstract

Strategies for teaching engineering in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) have been evolving over the past decades due to innovations in technology, as well as the development of educational methodologies. In the recent past, the focus for engineering faculty has been not only on promoting the skills needed to raise the level of employability of Emirati graduates, but increasingly on new educational methodologies, e-learning and wireless networked laptop technology. Students in the UAE exhibit certain characteristics emerging from a variety of cultural and historical traditions, as well as from methodologies of education used at the pre-tertiary levels. These characteristics include expecting to be passive recipients of taught information, and lack of independence in their approach to problem solving. In this paper I discuss the development of strategies to facilitate the transition of students from passive to active learning; examine the role of technology-driven educational methodologies in promoting independent and group-centered learning skills; and use a case study to explore the instruction of Engineering Design and Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and to examine how classroom management techniques have changed as a result of the growing use of technology.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Kasim Randeree, Ashish Mahal and Anjli Narwani

Organisations utilise Business Continuity Management (BCM) to support sustained performance of electronic systems on which their core activities are based. These…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations utilise Business Continuity Management (BCM) to support sustained performance of electronic systems on which their core activities are based. These organisations require a tool that can be used to assess the maturity of their existing BCM processes. Through the examination of the banking sector of the United Arab Emirates, the purpose of this paper is to address the need for a BCM maturity model.

Design/methodology/approach

A tailored BCM maturity model was developed using a two‐stage approach; the first stage was developing a model based on the analysis of five existing models; and the second stage was validation of the developed model against the formulated objectives through the use of focus groups with ten UAE banks, comprising of three BCM experts for each bank.

Findings

The research found that the provision of a standard maturity model for BCM as a situational analysis tool for the banking sector is functional and can be the basis of a tool to address the gap in organisations in general to assess the maturity level of their BCM processes.

Research limitations/implications

The developed model is limited to validation within a specific sector and geographically, with generic model validation being outside the scope of this research.

Practical implications

The framework provides different areas to which maturity can be assigned, various levels across quality and scope and how an overall BCM maturity of an organisation can be determined.

Originality/value

The development of a maturity model which could be used as a BCM self analysis tool is a significant addition to the BCM knowledge base.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Kasim Randeree and Mathews Ninan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of leadership and team processes in information technology (IT) projects in business environments. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of leadership and team processes in information technology (IT) projects in business environments. The paper contextualizes the study in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper addresses two central questions: what is the level of IT project team effectiveness in the UAE context? What is the maturity level of leadership in IT project management in the UAE? A tailored instrument, based on Cohen and Bailey's team effectiveness evaluation model, was used in this study of 42 project teams in the UAE across various sectors.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that IT projects in the UAE demonstrate a maturity level that is transactional, with task‐focused teams and people‐oriented leadership styles.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of the paper can facilitate broader contextualized research on leadership and IT project team effectiveness, with particular emphasis on developing economies. This is important in addressing the issue of high failure rates in IT projects in general.

Practical implications

Understanding the role of leadership and its responsibility in facilitating teams in technical and high failure environments can impact on productivity and success rates in future projects.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in providing collated opinion about constructs within IT project team processes and leadership effectiveness in the context of businesses in developing economies. The use of a maturity structure addressing leadership, trust, teams and cohesion is distinctive.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Kasim Randeree and Abdul Ghaffar Chaudhry

This paper aims to provide an examination of the extent to which different leadership styles impact employee job satisfaction and organizational commitment in the United…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an examination of the extent to which different leadership styles impact employee job satisfaction and organizational commitment in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) through a case analysis in the construction sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a survey of three companies, one client organization, one consultancy firm and one contracting company. The useable survey comprised 251 individual responses from 600 distributed, giving a response rate of 41.83 percent.

Findings

The findings show that consultative and consensus leadership styles are prevalent in the construction sector in the UAE. Further, it was found that an employee's job satisfaction is strongly affected by leadership, with more than 50 percent of survey respondents stating that leadership strongly influences their job satisfaction. Leadership style was found to moderately to strongly affect organizational commitment of employees in the industry in the UAE.

Practical implications

The survey provides a useful instrument by which organizations across other sectors and within different cultural contexts can evaluate the significance of leadership style, job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Originality/value

The work is unique in that it is an examination of the impact of organizational leadership style within a contemporary regional context. A number of studies have been carried out in the Arab world that suggest that leadership in Arab culture nurtures consultative and participative tendencies. These are all outdated by more than a decade and no recent study in the Arabian Gulf region exists and none which explore leadership styles' impact on employees.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Kasim Randeree

Awarding the Olympic Games to a host city in the Muslim world would send a clear indication from member nations of the International Olympic Committee of a desire by the…

Abstract

Purpose

Awarding the Olympic Games to a host city in the Muslim world would send a clear indication from member nations of the International Olympic Committee of a desire by the international community to engage with Muslim nations on a level that transcends sport. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to answer the question: will a city in the Muslim world ever become host to the greatest sporting spectacle on Earth, and, if so, which is most likely to receive it, when and why?

Design/methodology/approach

To gauge the potential of cities in the Muslim world hosting the Olympics Games, the approach of the paper is to examine the merits of former host cities and then qualitatively comparing these with member countries of the Organisation of Islamic Conference which have a majority Muslim population.

Findings

The research findings indicate that there are five cities in the Muslim world, at least one of which is likely to be awarded one of the coming six Summer Olympic Games between the years 2020 and 2040.

Research limitations/implications

The broader implications of the study are that, in examining Muslim nations of the world from the point of view of mega‐event management on a global scale, their development and advancement capability in the modern world can be probed.

Originality/value

In the absence of any other published study on the subject, this paper would open a discourse that would be of value to scholars and interested parties in diverse fields such as major programme management, Islamic studies, international politics, economics and international development.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

Abstract

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

David Palfreyman

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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