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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2021

Mahak Sharma, Ruchita Gupta, Padmanav Acharya and Karuna Jain

Cloud computing (CC) services have given a tremendous boost to the creation of efficient and effective solutions. With developing countries at a slow pace of adoption…

Abstract

Purpose

Cloud computing (CC) services have given a tremendous boost to the creation of efficient and effective solutions. With developing countries at a slow pace of adoption, this research aims to identify factors and their interrelationships influencing the adoption of CC in a developing country context. The developing countries are enjoying numerous benefits from CC services; however, its low adoption is still a question in developing economies; hence, the authors have selected the context of information and communication technology (ICT) firms in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative research method is used where experts from thirteen ICT firms in India are interviewed.

Findings

Sixteen factors, twenty-eight subfactors, and 25 interrelationships are revealed through content analysis. Further, causal loop diagrams are proposed to display the behavior of cause and effect of these factors from a system's perspective. This will help to understand the relationships among the factors in order to enhance the speed of CC adoption. Possible financial loss and resistance to change are found as the key barriers to adoption. The proposed interrelationships can guide both policymakers and service providers for designing effective CC policies.

Originality/value

This is the first scholarly work that identifies interrelationships among factors and subfactors, thereby providing a holistic picture to decision-makers while making a choice on whether to adopt cloud services or continue with on premise data centers and servers.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Ashok Kumar Upadhyay and Karuna Jain

Modularity in design and construction of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is widely used for reduction in project construction time and cost. This paper aims to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

Modularity in design and construction of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is widely used for reduction in project construction time and cost. This paper aims to improve understanding of existence, rationale, relevance, types and definitions of modularity in NPPs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper approaches study of modularity in NPPs through review of existing literature. The objective of this paper is to answer the questions such as “what is the meaning of module in the context of NPPs?”, “what is the meaning of modularity in the context of NPPs?”, “why modularity is considered in the design and construction of NPPs?”, “what are the types of modules and modularity?” and “what are the emerging trends?”

Findings

Findings of the paper indicate towards widespread use of modularity to reduce construction time and cost, improve safety performance and enable smarter applications of NPPs. Large NPPs tend to use modularity to shorten the project gestation period, and thereby reduce capital cost. Small and medium size NPPs plan to use modularity for simpler and safer reactors that can be factory manufactured, transported, installed and scaled up as permitted by the economic environment.

Research limitations/implications

This being a review, it has the usual limitations associated with the literature review papers.

Practical implications

Findings of the paper may influence policy regarding option, type, size, design, engineering, procurement and construction of NPPs.

Social implications

Findings of the paper may influence the safety, cost, time and quality performance of future NPPs and facilitate cheaper and more reliable supply of electricity to consumers.

Originality/value

The systematic literature review presents issues and emerging trends in modularity of NPPs, enabling the future work to progress as modularity continues to develop and evolve. The paper also proposes a comprehensive classification and definitions of modules and modularity in NPPs that may facilitate understanding of these terms precisely and uniformly by researchers and practitioners alike.

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Sushma Priyadarsini Yalla, Som Sekhar Bhattacharyya and Karuna Jain

Post 1991, given the advent of liberalization and economic reforms, the Indian telecom sector witnessed a remarkable growth in terms of subscriber base and reduced…

Abstract

Purpose

Post 1991, given the advent of liberalization and economic reforms, the Indian telecom sector witnessed a remarkable growth in terms of subscriber base and reduced competitive tariff among the service providers. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the impact of regulatory announcements on systemic risk among the Indian telecom firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a two-step methodology to measure the impact of regulatory announcements on systemic risk. In the first step, CAPM along with the Kalman filter was used to estimate the daily β (systemic risk). In the second step, event study methodology was used to assess the impact of regulatory announcements on daily β derived from the first step.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that regulatory announcements did impact systemic risk among telecom firms. The study also found that regulatory announcements either increased or decreased systemic risk, depending upon the type of regulatory announcements. Further, this study estimated the market-perceived regulatory risk premiums for individual telecom firms.

Research limitations/implications

The regulatory risk premium was either positive or negative, depending upon the different types of regulatory announcements for the telecom sector firms. Thus, this study contributes to the theory of literature by testing the buffering hypothesis in the context of Indian telecom firms.

Practical implications

The study findings will be useful for investors and policy-makers to estimate the regulatory risk premium as and when there is an anticipated regulatory announcement in the Indian telecom sector.

Originality/value

This is one of the first research studies in exploring regulatory risk among the Indian telecom firms. The research findings indicate that regulatory risk does exist in the telecom firms of India.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2018

Rose Antony, Vivekanand B. Khanapuri and Karuna Jain

The purpose of this paper is to identify the dimensions of customer expectations and study the moderating role of demographics in the context of fresh food retail.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the dimensions of customer expectations and study the moderating role of demographics in the context of fresh food retail.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was designed using extant literature review followed by expert opinions. The survey was conducted among the customers in the twin cities of Maharashtra in India. The factors of customer expectations were identified using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and further confirmed using confirmatory factor analysis in SPSS and AMOS, respectively. The significance of the customer expectations on customer satisfaction was studied using structural equation modeling. Subsequently, the role of demographics was studied using two-step cluster analysis and multigroup moderation.

Findings

During EFA three factors emerged, namely, product-related features, in-store quality and store support services. Structural model evaluation found product-related features and in-store quality significantly influencing the customer satisfaction, while store support services were found as a non-significant factor in the region studied. Further, using cluster analysis customers were segregated into three groups, namely, traditional, autonomous and premium customers, where the premium customers were found to prefer the store support services on a higher scale, and similar results were obtained using multigroup moderation. Demographics, namely, gender, age, respondents’ income and marital status moderated for product-related features and in-store quality. Interestingly, respondents’ income also moderated for the store support services.

Practical implications

The findings provide directions for store managers of the fresh food category to align supply chain decisions with the unique requirements of customers considering their socio-economic characteristics.

Originality/value

On the basis of social exchange theory, the authors found that in a mutually beneficial relationship, concerning the value proposition, retailers need to address the requirement of the different income group customers for store support services.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Rajiv S. Narvekar and Karuna Jain

This paper seeks to provide a conceptual framework to understand the complex technological innovation process from a cognitive perspective.

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5591

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide a conceptual framework to understand the complex technological innovation process from a cognitive perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐disciplinary literature survey from multiple academic disciplines such as business management, philosophy, and psychology coupled with professional experience was employed to conceive the framework.

Findings

The framework can be a starting‐point for researchers to initiate research in the design of technological innovation systems, change management and organizational restructuring.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this paper is that the framework has been qualitatively validated in two publicly held R&D intensive organizations in India.

Practical implications

Senior managers from industry can initiate competence building using the managerial concepts employed in the framework. By leveraging the intellectual capital of the organization, intellectual property, including new products and processes, can be developed, which in turn improves business performance.

Originality/value

This paper introduced a framework to describe the innovation process. Two new constructs are introduced to account for the complexity and the uncertainty in the innovation process.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Lokesh Nagar and Karuna Jain

The purpose of this paper is to explore the functionality of multistage programming approach on network supply chain structure.

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2871

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the functionality of multistage programming approach on network supply chain structure.

Design/methodology/approach

The general supply chain structure is considered and the supply chain planning model is developed using a two stage programming approach. The same model is extended to cover the applicability and advantages of a multi‐stage programming approach.

Findings

A multi‐period supply chain model for new product launches under uncertain demand for supply chain network structure has been developed. The model allows simultaneous determination of optimum procurement quantity, production quantity across the different plants, transportation routes and the outsourcing cost in case of shortages. The proposed multi‐stage model is compared with the standard two‐stage model by examining the difference between the objective values of two solutions. The research clearly shows the importance of the multi‐stage model as compared to the two‐stage programming model.

Research limitations/implications

The models developed here are limited to covering demand uncertainty, whereas real supply chain exhibits different uncertainties like capacity, processing time, etc. This can be the future direction for extending the work.

Practical implications

The model is very useful in designing and planning the supply chain in an uncertain environment. The model allows the adjustment of the production plan as time progresses and uncertainties become resolved.

Originality/value

The model uses a scenario approach to address the supply chain planning problem for a supply chain network structure under an uncertain environment and compares the two‐solution approach for a set of problems. Generally supply chain costs are in millions of dollars and the saving using multi‐stage programming can be significant.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Karuna Jain, Lokesh Nagar and Vivek Srivastava

To develop an EOQ based model to quantify the benefit accrue due to coordination for the one supplier and n retailer supply chain system and concept to share the benefits…

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2242

Abstract

Purpose

To develop an EOQ based model to quantify the benefit accrue due to coordination for the one supplier and n retailer supply chain system and concept to share the benefits derived from coordination.

Design/methodology/approach

An intensive literature review has been done in the area of supply chain coordination covering both marketing and operational perspective. The analysis of literature has shown that models to quantify the benefits for supply chains consisting of a single supplier who supplies a product to multiple heterogeneous buyers are very limited. To fill this critical research gap the benefit sharing mechanism is derived based on optimal order quantity of the supply chain system.

Findings

This paper demonstrates the benefits of coordination to the supply chain system in terms of cost saving and generating the surplus money. It also suggests a way to find the range of prices to facilitated coordination. Under the developed pricing policy, no partner after coordination had to bear a loss. So in that sense we can say that the benefits of coordination are distributed to all the partners.

Practical implications

The proposed model for benefit sharing protects the interest of all supply chain partners and hence will be profitable to all. The pricing scheme suggested will motivate retailers to increase ordering quantity per order, thereby reducing the joint ordering and holding costs.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in terms of quantifying and sharing the benefits of coordination for one supplier – multi heterogeneous buyer supply chain system.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Rory L. Chase

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293

Abstract

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2008

Alan Bullion

Civil society in Sri Lanka has, to a large extent, been shaped by British colonial rule and the establishment of the modern, democratic state in the first half of the 20th…

Abstract

Civil society in Sri Lanka has, to a large extent, been shaped by British colonial rule and the establishment of the modern, democratic state in the first half of the 20th century. In pre-colonial times, grass roots communities organised around the need for collective work in temples and for irrigation. A notion of pre-colonial cooperation and harmony and an ideal traditional Buddhist society, which was lost due to colonialism and modernisation and should be revived, today forms part of the Sinhalese nationalist discourse and of the mobilisation rationale of the large community development organisation Sarvodaya (see Gombrich & Obeysekere, 1988; Brow, 1990).

Details

Conflict and Peace in South Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-534-5

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Ahmet C. Kurt and Nancy Chun Feng

Many argue that the design of compensation contracts for public company chief executive officers (CEOs) is often not guided by a goal of value maximization. Yet, there is…

Abstract

Many argue that the design of compensation contracts for public company chief executive officers (CEOs) is often not guided by a goal of value maximization. Yet, there is limited direct empirical evidence on the negative consequences of the proposed inefficient contracting between shareholders and CEOs. Using data on CEO bonus contracts of the S&P 500 firms, we investigate potential firm performance implications of the use of qualitative criteria such as leadership and mentoring in those contracts. We maintain that unlike quantitative criteria, qualitative criteria are difficult to define and measure on an objective basis, possibly resulting in an inefficient and biased incentive structure. Twenty-five percent of the sample observations have CEO bonus contracts that include a qualitative criterion for bonus payment determination. Our results show that employee productivity, asset productivity, capital expenditures, and future abnormal stock returns are lower for firms that use a qualitative criterion in CEO bonus contracts than those that do not. Further, contrary to the argument in prior literature that earnings management decreases with the use of subjective performance indicators in incentive contracts, we find that income-increasing accruals are actually higher when the CEO bonus contract includes a qualitative criterion. We recommend that compensation committees set concrete, measurable performance goals for CEOs, providing CEOs with better guidance and helping improve their corporate decision making.

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