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Abstract

Subject Area

Corporate Social Responsibility.

Study Level

This case is suitable to be used in advanced undergraduate and MBA/MSc level.

Case Overview

This case is about the conflict between Prof Bakar, the new Dean of Progressive Technical University (PTU), and the lecturers teaching the social innovation course. PTU was established in 1985 to provide opportunities for rural students to pursue technical education. Both parties had differing opinions over the suitability of projects in the social innovation curriculum. Dean Bakar was adamant that CSR is charity-based and therefore not suitable for the social innovation class. As the case unfolded, it was clear that each lecturer had different views about the course – indicating the wide-spectrum of views on the relationship between CSR and social innovation as well as social entrepreneurship. The case provides opportunities to deliberate on what constitutes “social purpose,” the 17 sustainable developmental goals, the global movement of social entrepreneurship and social innovation, impact investing and harvesting, as well as indigenous wisdom. The main trigger of the case is how to resolve the conflict and come up with an improved version of the course content, as well as a comparison framework for CSR, social innovation, and social entrepreneurship.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Using this case study, the students will be able to:

  • compare CSR, social innovation, and social entrepreneurship;

  • understand CSR activities and explain their main features based on the given case facts;

  • analyze and solve the conflict between Dean Bakar and the six social innovation lecturers;

  • propose solutions on how to review the social innovation course; and

  • discuss how different perceptions could affect decision-making.

compare CSR, social innovation, and social entrepreneurship;

understand CSR activities and explain their main features based on the given case facts;

analyze and solve the conflict between Dean Bakar and the six social innovation lecturers;

propose solutions on how to review the social innovation course; and

discuss how different perceptions could affect decision-making.

Details

Green Behavior and Corporate Social Responsibility in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-684-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2020

Aries Susanty, Nia Budi Puspitasari, Singgih Saptadi and Shinta Devi Siregar

This study aims to create the causal relationship between transportation behavior to Karimunjawa, the number of tourists and the amount of CO2 produced; calculate the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to create the causal relationship between transportation behavior to Karimunjawa, the number of tourists and the amount of CO2 produced; calculate the reduction of CO2 emissions from the transportation to Karimunjawa based on several proposed policy scenarios; and formulate the managerial implication and recommendation to support the implementation of several proposed policy scenarios.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops a system dynamics‐based model by using three sub-systems, i.e. “the number of tourist sub-system,” “the switching behavior of tourist travel sub-system” and “the CO2 emission sub-system.”

Findings

The simulation results have shown that, under the current situation, tourist travel behavior should be changed to maximum condition to get the minimum CO2 emission. Improvement of the behavior of tourist in selecting the mode of transportation and the departure point of mini-tour bus and ferry are an effective way to reduce the CO2 emission.

Research limitations/implications

This study only considers limited variables as the driver of the level of change of the capacity of Karimunjawa and the road as well as the variables as the driver of tourism growth. This study only focuses on CO2 emission from the direct impacts of tourist travel; this study does not consider the indirect impact of tourism activity on CO2 emissions. International air travel is not included in the present study.

Practical implications

From a managerial perspective, this study demonstrates that change in the tourist travel behavior is generally not effective in triggering CO2 emission reduction, unless it is accompanied by the strict restriction policy related to the tourist route.

Social implications

This study has the potential to raise societal awareness that the causality of tourist growth and CO2 emissions should be seen as the impact of tourist travel behavior. In this case, to modify the travel behavior, tourist needs to change their mode of transportation to more sustainable transportation.

Originality/value

This paper intends to fill the literature gap of the effect of tourism growth from two perspectives, namely, tourist travel behavior and environmental. The modeling of tourist transport and CO2 emission will provide an overview of the selection of the problem-solving mode for tourist transport that can give a significant contribution to the greenhouse gas emissions reduction to the environmental.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Kartini

This paper aims to reveal the empirical facts of pressure, rationalization, effect on opportunity and fraud prevention and accountability to fraud prevention in Rumah…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reveal the empirical facts of pressure, rationalization, effect on opportunity and fraud prevention and accountability to fraud prevention in Rumah Sakit Umum Daerah (RSUD; local public hospitals in English) in West Sulawesi Province.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is explanatory in nature, with a time horizon from January to July 2016. The research objects were selected from local public hospitals (RSUD) in West Sulawesi Province. The population in this study is employees working at regional general hospitals in West Sulawesi Province. While sample is determined based on cluster sampling technique, the analysis tool used is structural equation modeling.

Findings

The variables of pressure and rationalization are found to have a positive and significant effect on opportunity, so improvements in the variables pressure and rationalization will create improvements in the variable opportunity. Pressure, rationalization and opportunity variables have a positive and significant effect on fraud prevention, so improvements in pressure, rationalization and opportunity variables will create improvements in variable fraud prevention. Accountability variables have a negative and significant effect on fraud prevention, so a high value of accountability will decrease the value of fraud prevention.

Originality/value

Originality of this paper shows built developing fraud prevention model in regional public hospital in West Sulawesi Province with five variables, namely, pressure, rationalization, opportunity, accountability and fraud prevention.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Suraiya Ishak, Kartini Khalid and Nidzam Sulaiman

This paper aims to examine consumers’ responses to products that are influenced by their moral justification. Specifically, this paper examines the factors related to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine consumers’ responses to products that are influenced by their moral justification. Specifically, this paper examines the factors related to consumers’ moral response and choices, including religious affiliation and obligation, group memberships, group reference, type of product and link of egregious conduct to particular products. This study explicates Adam Smith’s concept of people’s proprietary emotion that potentially affects their purchasing behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses focus group discussion with nine consumers across ethnic groups in Malaysia. A recent boycott case was used to stimulate the group discussion. Their statements are displayed in the findings to show their expressions verbatim.

Findings

The findings outline that consumers’ participation in the boycott of products is influenced by their moral judgment with frequent addressing of the religious affiliation and obligation, group reference and group membership factors. Additionally, there is a tendency that certain issue(s), although perceived as a universal humanistic issue, would be relatively closer to people with backgrounds similar to the majority of the victims of a particular issue. However, such a boycott action has issues such as duration of action, consistency of action and choice of pragmatic over moral decision that weigh the efficacy of the boycott action toward products related to certain egregious actions. Overall, the non-participation decision had been attached to factors such as type of product, boycotting cost, brand attraction and function or usefulness of products. These factors may also moderate consumers’ sentiment to boycott a particular product(s) in the long term.

Originality/value

This paper offers new insight regarding factors influencing participation in the boycott of products which were suspected to have link with egregious conduct towards certain Muslim groups. This paper offers a different perspective by integrating ethical theory into the discussion. In addition, it explores the influence of Muslims’ brotherhood concept on participation in boycott activities.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Suraiya Ishak, Ahmad Raflis Che Omar, Kartini Khalid, Intan Safiena Ab. Ghafar and Mohd Yusof Hussain

The purpose of this study is to describe cosmetics purchase behavior of young, educated Muslim females in Malaysia and to explore its relationship with certain potential…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe cosmetics purchase behavior of young, educated Muslim females in Malaysia and to explore its relationship with certain potential antecedents.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a survey on a sample of female consumers from four higher education institutions in the urban area of Bangi Selangor, Malaysia. From their respective institutions, 150 respondents were selected through the purposive sampling method. Self-administered questionnaire has been used to gather information from the respondents. The survey data were analyzed using descriptive, t-test and correlation analyses to accomplish the study objectives.

Findings

The study indicates that millennial Muslim cosmetic purchase behavior falls under the “Limited Decision Making” classification. The classification is due to the pattern of pro-active behaviors exhibit through the information search for details about ingredients, halal clue, countries of origin, health safety guarantee and the benefits of the cosmetic products. Young, educated female consumers adore branded cosmetic items and show willingness to accept higher prices for the branded items. Despite brand consciousness, they demonstrate a relatively high concern on the halalness of the product. Based on the correlation analysis, all variables were found to be significant and the most significant of them was brand.

Research limitations/implications

Millennial consumers are information technology savvy and have access to vast information about products. As a result, the findings reiterate that millennial consumers demonstrate different purchase behavior, which is worth exploring by future researchers. In addition, other latent antecedents such as religiosity and world view are worth including in future studies.

Practical implications

Cosmetic manufacturers and marketers must ensure that their products signal positive images to fit the expectations of young and educated Muslim consumers. Although brand conscious, such consumers demonstrate prudent behavior in terms of searching for halalan and toyyiban products.

Originality/value

This study adds value in the area of halal product marketing because of two unique focuses. First, it examines the purchase of cosmetic products, which are relatively understudied compared to halal food. Second, it considers the perspectives of educated Muslim millennials, who are expected to demonstrate more specific purchase behaviors than a generalized millennial group. Therefore, the originality of this study revolves around the consideration of these two aspects, which are relevant to contemporary business marketing discussions.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2013

Raewyn Connell

This essay responds to comments on Southern Theory by Mustafa Emirbayer, Patricia Hill Collins, Raka Ray, and Isaac Reed as part of a larger discussion about the future of…

Abstract

This essay responds to comments on Southern Theory by Mustafa Emirbayer, Patricia Hill Collins, Raka Ray, and Isaac Reed as part of a larger discussion about the future of postcolonial sociology. It clarifies aspects of Southern Theory that are commented upon while stressing the big claim of Southern Theory, which is that the periphery produces social theory that sociology should take seriously in order to make for a more global and democratic intellectual project of social change.

Details

Decentering Social Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-727-6

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Ana Shakirah Md.Sapir @ Md.Shafik and Wan Marhaini Wan Ahmad

University students are known to face many challenges in achieving high financial literacy. The purpose of this paper is to examine the level of financial literacy among…

Abstract

Purpose

University students are known to face many challenges in achieving high financial literacy. The purpose of this paper is to examine the level of financial literacy among Malaysian Muslim undergraduates as explained through sociocultural variables. Furthermore, this paper explores a few additional Islamic measurements as part of assessing the level of financial literacy among the students.

Design/methodology/approach

The questionnaires were drafted based on a multi-dimensional financial literacy model and distributed conveniently to 330 respondents. Post-interviews were also conducted with selected students to further comprehend the sociocultural context.

Findings

The findings suggest that exposing students to financial education and practices influence their financial literacy scores. Students who attended muamalat-related courses demonstrated better financial literacy scores. Meanwhile, post-interview results indicate that the students’ social environment and interactions also play important roles in enhancing their financial literacy. Hence, it is believed that it is essential to embed Islamic-based measurements to equip students with financial literacy in tandem with their pedagogic development. The results thus extend previous studies by confirming the importance of Islamic-based finance- and business-related knowledge for all tertiary students. Furthermore, the curricula should be made compatible to their studying environment and attuned to their values and cultures.

Practical implications

The findings suggest the introduction of personal financial and muamalat-based knowledge and practices relative to their Islamic programme orientation. This should take place during the students’ academic years and across all academic programmes’ orientation. The study also highlights the importance of developing special measurements of Islamic financial literacy for Muslims congruent to their distinct Islamic identity.

Social implications

The study indicates the importance of high financial literacy among tertiary students for them to have a financially stable future.

Originality/value

The research is original in its use of several measurements of financial literacy that embedded Islamic teachings concomitant to the Muslim respondents.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 11 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Ainol Mardhiah, Dadang Rakhmat Hidayat, Agus Rahmat and Nuryah Asri Sjafirah

Purpose – This study aims to explore the composition of women parliament members in provincial parliament in Aceh Province.Design/Methodology/Approach – The study which…

Abstract

Purpose – This study aims to explore the composition of women parliament members in provincial parliament in Aceh Province.

Design/Methodology/Approach – The study which applied qualitative approach. The data were collected through interviews, observations and documentation study.

Finding – The findings show that the DewanPerwakilan Rakyat Aceh (DPRA) (provincial parliament) women representative are not in line with the order of election Regulation No. 12 the year 2003 which state should be an “affirmative action” or reaches about 30% of total members. In addition, ironically that women are not playing important and strategic roles, such as a chairman, deputy chairman, in each commission, discussion division, budgeting division, and regulation division. The biggest challenge of women parliament members in campaigning their rights and responsibilities at the parliament so that they would be improved in quality and capacity, as well communication and personal knowledge. Furthermore, building stronger linkages internally and externally (political parties, fraction, and all other parliament members), and (stakeholders, peer groups, NGOs, academics, expert etc).

Practical Implications – The solutions offered in this paper can be of concern to all parliamentarians to be able to provide equal opportunities for women legislative members in a strategic position in parliament.

Originality/Value – In addition to increasing the theoretical understanding of the political communication and the importance of the presence of the women in the local parliament.

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Abstract

Details

Green Behavior and Corporate Social Responsibility in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-684-2

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

A.R. Alina, A.S. Babji and S. Affandi

The purpose of this paper is to improve the nutritional value of chicken nuggets by partial substitution of animal fat with palm stearin. Three nugget formulations with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the nutritional value of chicken nuggets by partial substitution of animal fat with palm stearin. Three nugget formulations with the fat level of 10.3 per cent palm fats consisted of blends from Olein: Stearin at ratios of 30:70, 50:50, 70:30 were used to replace chicken skin (control). Palm fat treatments resulted in a significant decrease of cholesterol content.

Design/methodology/approach

Four nugget formulations with the fat level of 10.3 per cent palm fats consisting of blends from Olein: Stearin at ratio of 30:70, 50:50, 70:30 and a commercial shortening, Socfat 36 are studied. The same formulation using chicken skin as a control and a commercial brand of nugget is used as a comparison. Proximate analysis of raw and cooked palm fat nuggets showed a decrease in the protein content and an increase of the fat content. The cholesterol content were reduced up to 45.9 per cent through the addition of palm fat, when compared against the control treatment. Fatty acid composition of palm fats in the palm substituted formulations increased the level of C16:0 and decreased C16:1, C18:1, C18:2, compared with fat from chicken skin.

Findings

The cholesterol content was reduced by 45.9 per cent when chicken skin and fat were substituted with palm fats. The texture of chicken nugget increased when added with palm fats. Palmitic acid (C16:0) content increased while palmitoleic acid (C16:1), oleic (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) decreased in palm fat treated nuggets.

Originality/value

The paper is of value in showing how palm stearin and olein usage in chicken nuggets helps reduce the product's cholesterol content.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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