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Article

Karlheinz Kautz and Kim Thaysen

The literature in the field of knowledge management shows a certain preoccupation with information technology (IT) and technical solutions while it reflects a limited view…

Abstract

The literature in the field of knowledge management shows a certain preoccupation with information technology (IT) and technical solutions while it reflects a limited view of organisational knowledge. The practice of knowledge management is commonly degraded to implementation of new IT‐based systems, neglecting important organisational aspects, in particular human and social issues. This paper presents a case that involves a small Danish software company where these matters have been taken into account. The starting point for the utilisation of IT was a study of the concepts, knowledge and learning. Embedded in the daily activities of employees, IT, as just one of several measures, is intended to support and facilitate learning rather than regulate or impede the process. This will be demonstrated with two examples from the case. In this context, we will also examine to what extent it makes sense to distinguish between different types of knowledge and knowledge processes and how far different perspectives of knowledge management contribute to the deployment of appropriate IT support.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Karlheinz Kautz

Abstract

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Information Technology & People, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Hubert Biskup and Karlheinz Kautz

Discusses problems related to software engineering taskmaintenance. Argues that since many scientists and practitioners haveregarded maintenance as divorced from…

Abstract

Discusses problems related to software engineering task maintenance. Argues that since many scientists and practitioners have regarded maintenance as divorced from development, it is not properly embedded in project models. Relates four case studies. Looks at the range of maintenance tasks and strategies. Proposes a change of perspective that would make maintenance part of development. Advocates methods, tools and techniques as possible means of overcoming the problematic situation.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Reinhard Budde, Karlheinz Kautz, Karin Kuhlenkamp and Heinz Züllighoven

Explains and defines prototyping in terms of its character, actorsand types. Examines four aspects: its use in the software developmentprocess, its goals, horizontal and…

Abstract

Explains and defines prototyping in terms of its character, actors and types. Examines four aspects: its use in the software development process, its goals, horizontal and vertical and the relationship between prototype and application system. Clarifies the distinction between breadboard and prototype.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 6 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Karlheinz Kautz

Abstract

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Information Technology & People, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Karlheinz Kautz

This paper aims to explore a case of customer and user participation in an agile software development project, which produced a tailor‐made information system for…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore a case of customer and user participation in an agile software development project, which produced a tailor‐made information system for workplace support as a step towards a theory of participatory design in agile software development.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an integrated framework for user participation derived from the participatory design literature the research was performed as a case study and semi‐structured, open‐ended interviews were conducted with about a third of the development team and with a representative sample of key players and future users in the customer organization. The interview data were supplemented with company and project documents.

Findings

The paper found genuine customer and user participation carried out by onsite customers and by other operational staff in the form of direct and indirect participation and with functional and democratic empowerment. The onsite customers played informative, consultative and participative roles. The analysis revealed that planning games, user stories and story cards, working software and acceptance tests structured the customer and user participation. This form of user participation supported a balance between flexibility and project progress and resulted in a project and a product which were considered a success by the customer and the development organization. The analysis showed that the integrative framework for user participation can also fruitfully be used in a new context to understand what participatory design is and how, when and where it can be performed as an instance of a design process in agile development. As such the paper contributes to an analytical and a design theory of participatory design in agile development. Furthermore the paper explicates why participatory design contributes to the successful completion of the investigated project. By drawing on innovation theory it was found that participatory design in agile development bears the characteristics of a successful organizational innovation. Grounding further explanations in complex adaptive systems theory the paper provides an additional argument why participatory design despite some identified challenges fosters project staff to successfully carry out the agile development project.

Originality/value

The paper presents an exploratory, empirical study of an understudied phenomenon and contributes to theory building.

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Article

Karlheinz Kautz and Even Åby Larsen

This article analyzes a European‐wide dissemination project which aimed at spreading quality management and software process improvement approaches among organizations in…

Abstract

This article analyzes a European‐wide dissemination project which aimed at spreading quality management and software process improvement approaches among organizations in the IT sector and beyond to organizations which produce software as part of their primary product. The research presented investigates to what extent that mission has been accomplished and what lessons can be learned for similar actions in the future. For the analysis Rogers’ well‐known model of the diffusion of innovations is used. A secondary outcome of the study therefore is an appraisal of the suitability of the model to plan and perform large‐scale diffusion actions.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Anyone who has been through a strategy‐planning process knows that it begins with remembering and codifying what an organization knows about itself, its products and its…

Abstract

Anyone who has been through a strategy‐planning process knows that it begins with remembering and codifying what an organization knows about itself, its products and its markets. There is now an increasing focus on building such knowledge management into everyday operations. This article looks at how organizations can find out what they know; and uses a case study from Denmark to show how IT can support the process.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article

John R. Venable, Jan Pries‐Heje, Deborah Bunker and Nancy L. Russo

This paper aims to introduce this special issue of ITP on systems for human benefit (S4HB), to develop and promote the idea of S4HB, and advocate that more research be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce this special issue of ITP on systems for human benefit (S4HB), to develop and promote the idea of S4HB, and advocate that more research be conducted on the design and diffusion of S4HB.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper argues that S4HB are systemically under‐researched based on a historical perspective on IS research and proposes an agenda for research on the design and diffusion of S4HB.

Findings

The paper identifies extant areas of S4HB, such as health and education, but also advocates that new areas of S4HB be identified and new kinds of S4HB be designed. It further discusses how diffusion is a key issue to the realisation of human benefits and contrasts diffusion of S4HB with more commercial business systems as a motivator for further research. Finally it sets out a brief agenda for research in S4HB, including: development of a vision for research on S4HB that emphasises design for solving human problems; research on diffusion of S4HB; revision of the way impact is assessed by journals to include assessment of the significance of the problem and the achievement of human benefit; and promotion of a research culture, policies, and funding that emphasises S4HB.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to pull together a common perspective on the disparate areas of S4HB. The paper identifies what S4HB are, what their goals are, what areas are concerned, and sets out an agenda for what research is needed to realise them and their benefits in society.

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