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Article

Tessa Withorn, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Jillian Eslami, Anthony Andora, Maggie Clarke, Nicole Patch, Karla Salinas Guajardo and Syann Lunsford

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2018.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 422 sources, and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and anyone interested as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Abstract

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Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-035-7

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Article

Holly Ellingwood, Karla Emeno, Craig Bennell, Adelle Forth, David Kosson and Robert D. Hare

The purpose of this paper is to examine the structure of juvenile psychopathy, as measured by the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL: YV).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the structure of juvenile psychopathy, as measured by the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL: YV).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 2,042 male youths from the USA, Canada, and the UK, the study was a conceptual replication of Bishopp and Hare’s (2008) multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of adult male offenders assessed with the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised.

Findings

The scaling analyses generally replicated those obtained by Bishopp and Hare, providing support for a multidimensional, four-factor model of juvenile psychopathy similar to that obtained with adults. However, a small number of items fell outside their predicted regions. Slight differences in the structure of juvenile psychopathy were found for incarcerated and supervised samples of youth, with the four-factor model breaking down slightly for the supervised sample. Item misplacements may indicate that certain items on the PCL: YV are being misinterpreted, reflect different dimensions for different samples, or cannot be reliably measured. Future research should examine these possibilities, with special attention being paid to supervised samples.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the first known attempts to use MDS analysis to examine the psychopathy structures that emerge for male juvenile offenders. The greater nuances afforded by using MDS offer a more comprehensive understanding of psychopathy between incarcerated and supervised youth using the PCL: YV.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the chemical and functional composition of acerola, guava and cashew freeze-dried pomaces.

Design/methodology/approach

Fruit pomaces were obtained from the pulp juice industrial sector and submitted to freeze-drying. Samples were analysed for composition (macronutrients, micronutrients, moisture and ash), technological attributes (morphological, hygroscopicity, retention of oil and water and solubility), bioactive compounds (total phenolics, flavonoids, proanthocyanins, anthocyanins, carotenoids and ascorbic acid), antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. Total phenolics, brown pigments and antioxidant activity of thermally treated samples were evaluated. Results were presented as mean and standard deviation, and submitted to Shapiro–Wilk normality test, and ANOVA statistical significance follows by Tukey’s post hoc test (p<0.05). Also, Pearson correlation coefficients were used to test the relationship between selected parameters.

Findings

Guava pomace had the highest insoluble fibre (40.6 per cent), protein (13.8 per cent) and lipid (9.3 per cent) contents and acerola higher soluble fibre (14.2 per cent) and water and oil holding capacity (12 and 5.4 g/g, respectively). Cashew pomace had higher solubility (45.3 per cent) and hygroscopicity (11.2 per cent). Acerola pomace had the highest phenolic content (5,331.7 mg AGE/100 g), DPPH and oxygen radical absorbance capacity antioxidant activity (63.3 and 756.6 µmol TE/g). Despite of that none of extracts showed antibacterial activity. All pomaces presented good antioxidant activity retention after thermal treatments (> 70 per cent), which might be correlated to thermally induced brown pigments.

Originality/value

This investigation was motivated by the large amounts of pomaces produced by the fruit pulp and juice processing industries, which represents a waste of residual phytochemicals and cause potential environmental problems. Overall, it was demonstrated that freeze-dried acerola, guava and cashew pomaces are promising ingredients for multiple food applications.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Karla M. Acosta, Zahra H. Mohammad, Heyao Yu, Kristen Kirkwood, Kristen Gibson, Jack A. Neal and Sujata A. Sirsat

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the layout has an effect on cross-contaminations levels at farmers markets.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the layout has an effect on cross-contaminations levels at farmers markets.

Design/methodology/approach

We used social cognitive theory's triadic reciprocity model to investigate how influencing the environment could change the behaviors of farmers’ market consumers and reduce the risk of microbial cross-contamination using a Fluorescent Compound (FC). For this purpose, a 3 × 2 experimental between-subject factorial design was utilized in this study: three farmers market layouts (i.e. U-shaped [U-S], L-shaped [L-S] and square-shaped [S–S]) and two different set-ups per market (i.e. produce and non-produce vendors completely separated, and alternating produce and non-produce vendors). FC was utilized to simulate microbial contamination on the participants (n = 54) hands. The participants were allowed to walk through the layout for 3 min and touch items after which a total of 475 swab samples were processed and recorded for absorbance levels.

Findings

The results indicated that the cross-contamination level of the U-S market was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than those of the L-S and S–S markets. The best market layout and set-up based on the average levels of simulated cross-contamination were the U-S market, particularly with the A set-up, where produce and non-produce booths were scattered.

Originality/value

This study is the first to use the quantification of FC to identify the impact of a farmers’ market layout/design on cross-contamination levels. These results can be used to provide guidance to market managers on layout and design from a safety standpoint to reduce the risk of cross-contamination.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Karla E. Von Dentz, Bianca S. Silva, Eveline A.I.F. Queiroz, Gisele F. Bomfim, André F. Nascimento, Mário M. Sugizaki and Renata A.M. Luvizotto

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa ethanolic extract (HsE) on protein levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa ethanolic extract (HsE) on protein levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, adiponectin and leptin in adipose tissue, as well as on the lipid and glycemic profiles of high-fat/sugar diet-induced obese (DIO) rats.

Design/methodology/approach

Obesity was induced in male Wistar rats through a high-fat/sugar diet provided for eight weeks. Control rats received a standard diet. The high-fat/sugar DIO animals were subsequently randomized into DIO (n = 8) and DIO treated with HsE (DIO + HsE, n = 8, 150 mg/kg/day) by gavage, for additional eight weeks. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed, and blood samples and epididymal adipose tissue were collected for biochemical analysis and adipokine protein level evaluation, respectively.

Findings

Compared to the DIO rats, HsE treatment decreased weight gain (50.6%) and mesenteric fat (42%), indicated as diminished visceral fat (22.5%). HsE did not affect the lipid profile and TNF-α levels in adipose tissue; however, it effectively prevented a 13% increase in fasting glucose levels and improved glucose tolerance. Compared with the C group, HsE normalized the adiponectin levels and leptin/adiponectin ratio and decreased the IL-6 (55%) and leptin (18.6%) levels in adipose tissue of obese rats.

Originality/value

HsE improves adipokine protein levels in high-fat/sugar DIO rats, demonstrating the clinical efficacy of HsE in the treatment of obesity and obesity-related diseases.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

Kaitlyn M. Eck, Colleen Delaney, Melissa D. Olfert, Rebecca L. Hagedorn, Miriam P. Leary, Madison E. Santella, Rashel L. Clark, Oluremi A. Famodu, Karla P. Shelnutt and Carol Byrd-Bredbenner

Eating away from home frequency is increasing and is linked with numerous adverse health outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to inform the development of health…

Abstract

Purpose

Eating away from home frequency is increasing and is linked with numerous adverse health outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to inform the development of health promotion materials for improving eating away from home behaviors by elucidating related parent and child cognitions.

Design/methodology/approach

Parents (n=37) and children (n=35; ages 6–11 years) participated in focus group discussions, based on social cognitive theory. Data were content analyzed to detect themes.

Findings

Many parents were concerned about what children ate away from home, however, others were less concerned because these occasions were infrequent. Lack of time and busy schedules were the most common barriers to eating fewer meals away from home. The greatest barrier to ensuring children ate healthfully away from home was parents were not present to monitor children’s intake. To overcome this, parents supervised what kids packed for lunch, provided caregivers instruction on foods to provide, and taught kids to make healthy choices. Kids understood that frequently eating away from home resulted in less healthful behaviors. Barriers for kids to eat healthy when away from home were tempting foods and eating in places with easy access to less healthy food. Kids reported they could take responsibility by requesting healthy foods and asking parents to help them eat healthfully away from home by providing healthy options and guidance.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to qualitatively analyze parent and child eating away from home cognitions. It provides insights for tailoring nutrition education interventions to be more responsive to these audiences’ needs.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part

Christy M. Borders, Stacey Jones Bock, Karla Giese, Stephanie Gardiner-Walsh and Kristi M. Probst

The world revolves around sound. Children who are deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH) lack access to sound, thus need careful monitoring and planning to ensure they have access to…

Abstract

The world revolves around sound. Children who are deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH) lack access to sound, thus need careful monitoring and planning to ensure they have access to adequate language models and supports to develop a strong language foundation. It is this foundation that is needed to ensure D/HH children are able to achieve developmental and academic milestones. Research is emerging to suggest specific intervention strategies that can be used to support D/HH children from birth throughout their educational career. In this chapter, we highlight several strategies that can be used to support communication, language, academic, and social/emotional growth. We freely admit that this is in no way a comprehensive and exhaustive list, but rather only scratches the surface. The field of deaf education and related research and technology is constantly changing. To ensure adequate educational access, it is highly recommended that a professional specialized in hearing loss be a part of the educational team any time a child is identified as having any degree or type of hearing loss.

Details

Viewpoints on Interventions for Learners with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-089-1

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Article

Stanislav Karapetrovic and Walter Willborn

Quality audit, as a methodology for evaluating system, product and/or process performance against established requirements, has experienced substantial growth in worldwide…

Abstract

Quality audit, as a methodology for evaluating system, product and/or process performance against established requirements, has experienced substantial growth in worldwide use in recent years. This is largely due to the steady increase in ISO 9000 registrations, which topped 350,000 in the year 2000. Based on the fundamental principles of independence, objectivity and professionalism, the audit is an irreplaceable tool when confirmation of compliance with standards is sought. However, it commonly fails in enabling continuous improvement and spanning the differing aspects of business performance beyond conventional “quality assurance”. This paper argues for removing one of the principles of traditional auditing, namely independence, to empower the process owner to conduct periodic self‐evaluations of process performance. Such “self‐audits” would be less formal than quality audits, and, much like the better‐known self‐assessments against business excellence models, aimed at continuous quality improvement. The concept, principles and practices of a self‐audit are focused on.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

Christine E. Walsh, Rebecca Seguin-Fowler, Alice Ammerman, Karla Hanson, Stephanie B. Pitts Jilcott, Jane Kolodinsky, Marilyn Sitaker and Susan Ennett

Snacking contributes to one-quarter of children’s total daily energy intake in the USA, with many snack foods being nutrient-poor and energy-dense. Snacking and sugary…

Abstract

Purpose

Snacking contributes to one-quarter of children’s total daily energy intake in the USA, with many snack foods being nutrient-poor and energy-dense. Snacking and sugary beverage consumption have been identified as potential contributors to childhood overweight and obesity and may play a particularly important role among children from socioeconomically disadvantaged households that generally display higher rates of obesity. This exploratory study investigated associations between consumption of snack foods, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and overweight and obesity in children from low-income households.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from households that participated in a multi-state cost-offset (CO-CSA) community supported agriculture intervention in 2016 and 2017 (n = 305) were analyzed. Fixed effect regression models were used to estimate associations between child monthly consumption of salty snack foods; sweet snack foods and SSBs; and child weight status, accounting for demographic characteristics.

Findings

No associations were found between snack or SSB consumption and child overweight. However, household income was significantly, negatively related to all three consumption variables (Salty snacks: ß = −0.09, SE = 0.04, p = 0.02; Sweet snacks: ß= −0.10, SE = 0.04, p = 0.01; SSB: ß= −0.21, SE = 0.05, p = 0.0001). The results suggest that household income may play an important role in children’s snacking and SSB behaviors among more disadvantaged households.

Practical implications

Factors beyond snack food and SSB consumption should be explored to better understand childhood overweight and obesity, and to inform future obesity interventions.

Originality/value

Socioeconomic disparities in childhood obesity are an ongoing policy-relevant issue within the USA and internationally. This study provides new information about child snacking behaviors in a unique, low-income population and contributes to the evidence base regarding the role household context in shaping child consumption behaviors.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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