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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2014

Arkadiusz Dabrowski, Karl Elkjaer, Louise Borregaard, Tomasz Zawada and Leszek Golonka

The purpose of this paper is to develop the device made of low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) and lead zirconate titanate (PZT) by co-firing both materials. In the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop the device made of low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) and lead zirconate titanate (PZT) by co-firing both materials. In the paper, the technology and properties of a miniature uniaxial ceramic accelerometer are presented.

Design/methodology/approach

Finite element method (FEM) is applied to predict properties of the sensor vs main dimensions of the sensor. The LTCC process is applied during manufacturing of the device. All the advantages of the technology are taken into account during designing three-dimensional structure of the sensor. The sensitivity and resonant frequency of the accelerometer are measured. Real material parameters of PZT are estimated according to measurement results and FEM simulations.

Findings

The ceramic sensor integrated with SMD package with outer dimensions of 5 × 5 × 5 mm3 is manufactured. The accelerometer exhibits sensitivity of 0.75 pC/g measured at 100 Hz. The resonant frequency is equal to about 2 kHz. Useful frequency range is limited by 3 dB sensitivity change at about 1 kHz.

Research limitations/implications

Sensitivity of the device is limited by interaction between LTCC and PZT materials during co-firing process. The estimated d parameters are ten times worse comparing to bulk Pz27 material. Further research on materials compatibility should be carried out.

Practical implications

The sensor can be easily integrated into various devices made of standard electronic printed circuit boards (PCBs). Applied method of direct integration of piezoelectric transducers with LTCC material enables manufacturing of complex ceramic systems with built-in accelerometer in the substrate.

Originality/value

The accelerometer is a sensor and a package simultaneously. The miniature ceramic device is compatible with surface mounting technology; hence, it can be used directly on PCBs for vibration monitoring inside electronic devices and systems.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 February 2011

Bente Elkjaer and Barbara Simpson

In the past, critics have dismissed American Pragmatism as intellectually naïve and philosophically passé, but in this chapter we argue that it still has much to offer the…

Abstract

In the past, critics have dismissed American Pragmatism as intellectually naïve and philosophically passé, but in this chapter we argue that it still has much to offer the field of organization studies. Pragmatism is especially relevant to those organizational scholars who are concerned with understanding the dynamic processes and practices of organizational life. This chapter lays out the historical development of Pragmatism, recognizing the originating contributions of Peirce, James, Dewey and Mead. Although each of these writers developed unique philosophical positions, their ideas are all permeated by four key themes: experience, inquiry, habit and transaction. The interplay between these themes informs a temporal view of social practice in which selves and situations are continuously constructed and reconstructed through experimental and reflexive processes of social engagement. We then use organizational learning theory as an example to illustrate the relevance of these four themes, contrasting the anti-dualistic stance of Pragmatism with the work of Argyris and Schön. Finally we turn to consider Weick's organizing and sensemaking, suggesting that Pragmatism offers three potential foci for further development of these theories, namely continuity of past and future in the present, the transactional nature of social agency and reflexivity in social practices. Similarly we see potential for Pragmatism to productively inform the theorizing of other organizational practices such as identity work, strategy work, emotion work and idea work.

Details

Philosophy and Organization Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-596-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Brenda A. Barker Scott and Michael R. Manning

Ask leaders what their organizations need more of to thrive, and many will identify collaboration. Yet many collaborative efforts fail. A focus on the inner workings of…

Abstract

Ask leaders what their organizations need more of to thrive, and many will identify collaboration. Yet many collaborative efforts fail. A focus on the inner workings of teams, to the exclusion of the ecosystem in which teams work, has masked the importance of a collaborative context. We undertook a single case study of an exemplar firm with the intent of offering a nuanced illustration of the collaborative workplace. We illustrate how three contextual factors related to work, relationships, and behaviors shift the setting from a place where collaboration is hard to do, to one that embodies collaboration as a widespread competence.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Karl‐Erik Sveiby and Roland Simons

Suggests that collaborative climate is one of the major factors influencing effectiveness of knowledge work. Discusses the concept of collaborative climate and develops a…

7359

Abstract

Suggests that collaborative climate is one of the major factors influencing effectiveness of knowledge work. Discusses the concept of collaborative climate and develops a survey instrument to measure it. Presents results based on data from 8,277 respondents in a wide variety of public and private sector organisations. Collaborative climate tends to improve with age, education level and managerial role. It is generally better in private firms, and seems to peak with mid‐size firm level. Employees tend to experience a U‐formed appreciation of the collaborative climate. Theories proposing that people reach a “professional plateau” (an S‐formed curve) have been supported to some degree. Finally, collaborative climate in the private sector is generally better than in the public sector. Uses the data to identify gaps and potentials for improving effectiveness. Further investigates two cases of good and bad practice and identifies strengths and weaknesses.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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