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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Karl Blyth, John Lewis and Ammar Kaka

This paper reports on the development of a framework for a standardized programme of works for construction projects. A sample of 50 buildings, encompassing a total of 11…

Abstract

This paper reports on the development of a framework for a standardized programme of works for construction projects. A sample of 50 buildings, encompassing a total of 11 different project functions, were surveyed and analysed. The sample was then investigated further to assess the existence of similarities and repeated operations in each individual construction project. A minimum of 20 standardized elemental options were identified. From analysis of the data and the application of practitioners’ expertise, a logical sequence of activities, including their respective dependencies, was produced. A set of six new test projects was used to see if the initial methodology was sound. It could be concluded that despite each project being unique, most buildings retain cognate, elemental options that provide the basis for any structure, and these can be standardized and used as a basis for a universal programme of construction works. The standardization of activities would enable the automation of project planning processes and hence would result in reduced administration and management costs. This will encourage contractors and other project team members to undertake planning at earlier stages of the project, hence providing the basis for more accurate cash flow, duration and cost forecasts.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Karl Blyth and Ammar Kaka

Cash flow forecasting is an indispensable tool for construction companies, and is essential for the survival of any contractor at all stages of the work. A simple and fast…

Abstract

Purpose

Cash flow forecasting is an indispensable tool for construction companies, and is essential for the survival of any contractor at all stages of the work. A simple and fast technique of forecasting cash flow accurately is required, considering the short time available and the associated cost. Seeks to examine this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper argues that instead of producing an S‐curve that is based on historical projects combined (state‐of‐the‐art is based on classifying projects into groups and producing a standard curve for each group simply by fitting one curve into the historical data), here the attempt is to produce an individual S‐curve for an individual project. A sample of data from 50 projects was collected and 20 criteria were identified to classify these projects. Using the most influential criteria, a multiple linear regression model was created to forecast the programme of works and hence the S‐curves. A further six projects were used to validate and test the model.

Findings

The results of the model developed in this paper were compared with previous models and evaluated. It is concluded that the model produced more accurate results than existing value and cost models.

Originality/value

The paper proposes an alternative and novel approach to the development of standard value and cost commitment S‐curves. This approach is based on a multiple linear regression model of the programmes of works.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2013

Bettina Lange

This introduction unpacks the key question that informs the articles in this special issue. How does a social sphere inform regulation and, more specifically, how can the…

Abstract

This introduction unpacks the key question that informs the articles in this special issue. How does a social sphere inform regulation and, more specifically, how can the regulatory capacity of a social sphere be harnessed, as an alternative or significant complementary force to state regulation and reliance on the self-regulatory capacity of markets? This question is salient and topical also in light of the search for new regulatory strategies and perspectives in the aftermath of the 2007 financial and subsequent EU sovereign debt crises, which have led to a major realignment of economy and society in a number of countries.

This introduction argues that economic sociology is a crucial reference point for understanding more about the social practices that constitute business behavior. It enables to explore the scope and significance of often interlinked social and legal norms for regulating various transnational risks that economic activity can give rise to. The introduction therefore locates the quest for understanding more about the regulatory capacity of a social sphere in debates that draw on Karl Polanyi’s analysis of the embedding, disembedding, and re-embedding of economic activity into social norms. The introduction highlights one of the key themes developed in this special issue, the idea of society within economy which questions an assumed conceptual distinction between economy and society.

This introduction concludes by specifying how the accounts of risk regulation developed in this special issue chart a path that is different from recent explorations of the role of a social sphere in regulation, which were conducted under the banner of “the sociological citizen,” “regulatory sociability,” and “collaborative governance.”

Details

From Economy to Society? Perspectives on Transnational Risk Regulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-739-9

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2019

Nicolas Postel and Richard Sobel

This study aims to focus on the understanding corporate social responsibility (CSR), this “novel” form of corporate engagement, and evaluating its capacity to regulate…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on the understanding corporate social responsibility (CSR), this “novel” form of corporate engagement, and evaluating its capacity to regulate capitalism. The authors advance the following thesis: CSR constitutes a new variety of regulation of capitalism which, to work efficiently, must be built on collective institutions (through both collective agreements and forms of coercion), instead of strictly contractual forms (based on inter-individual relations and voluntary commitments).

Design/methodology/approach

To support this thesis, the authors use Karl Polanyi’s theory, in particular his concept of “fictitious commodities”. Like Polanyi, we contend that CSR is a necessary reaction to the new “great transformation” brought about by the financialisation of our economy which is currently in crisis. Polanyi agrees that this kind of regulation can yield results only when based on collective institutions. In the last section of the study, the authors attempt to determine how a “conventionalist analysis” of CSR could help us to precisely describe this phenomenon and how it could be institutionalised by actors (both inside and outside companies).

Findings

This paper theoretically demonstrates the role of institutions in CSR processes and the need to weigh them theoretically. In this sense, the paper demonstrates the aporia of a strictly contractualist framework, not only for the understanding of the phenomenon, but for its deployment.

Research limitations/implications

This study proposes a theoretical framework, which is yet to be consolidated by empirical research.

Practical implications

The paper proposes salient elements of a public policy of responsibility.

Social implications

The paper proposes a methodological framework to go beyond a bilateral representation of the institutional framework and to produce a collective representation of the negotiation.

Originality/value

This is an original paper in its theoretical positioning and the implications it suggests for economic policy.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Francesco Duina and Frédéric Mérand

How should we make sense of Europe's current malaise? Focused on the great recession, the European Union (EU)'s architecture, or diverging national interests, the…

Abstract

How should we make sense of Europe's current malaise? Focused on the great recession, the European Union (EU)'s architecture, or diverging national interests, the literature offers useful economic, institutional, and political explanations. It is our contention that, however diverse, these works share one important limitation: a tendency to focus on rather immediate causes and consequences and not to step back with historical or comparative perspectives to gain a “longer” view of the dynamics at work. In this article, we begin by examining parallels between the EU's current conditions and the Austrian-Hungarian Empire. Then, introducing the articles contained in this special issue, we raise research questions pertaining to long-term historical, social, cultural, economic, and political factors. Are the current challenges unprecedented or do they have roots or connections to past events and developments? Is there a European trajectory into which we can contextualize current events? Are there bright spots, and what do they suggest about Europe's present and future? To engage in such questions, the papers leverage the insights of historical and comparative sociology, as well as comparative politics. In so doing, they offer analyses that see the EU as an instance of state formation. They propose that a key dimension of tension and possible resolution is the classic problem of sovereignty. They grapple with the question of identity and institutions, exploring in that context the extent and limit of citizens' support for more Europe. And they delve into the nature of the nationalist and populist sentiments within and across European countries.

Details

Europe's Malaise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-042-4

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Book part
Publication date: 10 February 2015

Cornel Ban

Soon after the Lehman crisis, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) surprised its critics with a reconsideration of its research and advice on fiscal policy. The paper…

Abstract

Soon after the Lehman crisis, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) surprised its critics with a reconsideration of its research and advice on fiscal policy. The paper traces the influence that the Fund’s senior management and research elite has had on the recalibration of the IMF’s doctrine on fiscal policy. The findings suggest that overall there has been some selective incorporation of unorthodox ideas in the Fund’s fiscal doctrine, while the strong thesis that austerity has expansionary effects has been rejected. Indeed, the Fund’s new orthodoxy is concerned with the recessionary effects of fiscal consolidation and, more recently, endorses calls for a more progressive adjustment of the costs of fiscal sustainability. These changes notwithstanding, the IMF’s adaptive incremental transformation on fiscal policy issues falls short of a paradigm shift and is best conceived of as an important recalibration of the precrisis status quo.

Details

Elites on Trial
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-680-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Don Carter

The purpose of this paper is to examine the strong influence of Herbartian ideas on the first secondary school-based English course (1911) in New South Wales (NSW)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the strong influence of Herbartian ideas on the first secondary school-based English course (1911) in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Whilst previous research has established the influence of the “New Education” on the (NSW Director of Education, Peter Board, the architect of the) 1911 courses, no specific analysis of Johann Friedrich Herbart’s educational ideas has been undertaken in relation to this seminal secondary English course.

Design/methodology/approach

Through using three of Herbart’s key educational ideas as an interpretive framework to analyse the 1911 NSW Courses of Study for High Schools English course, the paper demonstrates the influence of those ideas on this inaugural secondary English course.

Findings

The analysis reveals that the NSW 1911 secondary English course was influenced by Herbartian educational ideas underpinning the course.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on the “pre-active”1911 rhetorical English curriculum in NSW, rather than the “enacted” implemented curriculum.

Practical implications

The paper identifies Herbartian influences on the 1911 NSW English syllabus, revealing important philosophical ideas.

Social implications

Future English curriculum design will benefit from the identification of the philosophical ideas embedded in the NSW 1911 English curriculum.

Originality/value

This analysis provides insights into the Herbartian influences on the first secondary English course in NSW.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Michael J. Roy, Pascal Dey and Simon Teasdale

In today’s “market society” almost every aspect of the everyday lives is shaped by market forces. In this essay, the purpose of this paper is to focus on the potential…

Abstract

Purpose

In today’s “market society” almost every aspect of the everyday lives is shaped by market forces. In this essay, the purpose of this paper is to focus on the potential role of social enterprise as one means of re-embedding the economy into society to ensure the economy works for people, rather than the other way around.

Design/methodology/approach

This is primarily a conceptual paper: a provocation.

Findings

The authors argue that to work as an embedding force, social enterprise needs to ensure both reciprocity and market exchange while acting in a way that attempts to compensate for the retreat of the state through providing public services and promoting collective decision-making and public deliberation.

Originality/value

Drawing upon the work of Karl Polanyi to conceptualise social enterprise as an “alternative” economic actor within a plural economic system, the authors contribute to on-going debates about social enterprise as an alternative way of organising markets and society. The authors highlight the challenges involved in achieving such a vision and suggest ways these might be overcome.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Steve Redhead

Abstract

Details

Theoretical Times
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-669-3

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