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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Frederik Reinder Hak and Karin Sanders

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the adaptation of the principled negotiation approach within organizations demonstrates similarities with the adaptation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the adaptation of the principled negotiation approach within organizations demonstrates similarities with the adaptation of evidence-based management and is the result of cognitive biases and cultural values instead of specific and conscious choices within the adopted negotiation style.

Design/methodology/approach

The adaptation of principled negotiation and evidence-based management are considered as a lack of willingness to be innovative at the organizational level, and when these ideas are introduced will meet resistance.

Findings

The analysis of the principled negotiation approach as an approach which – similar to evidence-based management – is vulnerable to cognitive biases and cultural values offers a solution on how to effectively adapt this approach within organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for research include a research design to test the assumptions of this paper to consider principled negotiations and evidence-based management approaches as innovative approaches.

Practical implications

Organizations and decision makers within organizations can benefit from the analysis in this paper.

Social implications

Companies and parties in a negotiation phase can benefit from the analysis by paying attention to the cognitive biases and cultural values of the other parties rather than paying attention to the first offer and the choices made in the negotiation.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to analyze principled negotiations from an evidence-based management perspective.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Razia Shaukat, Amna Yousaf and Karin Sanders

The purpose of this paper is to offer insights regarding the consequences of relationship conflict among employees in terms of their task performance, contextual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer insights regarding the consequences of relationship conflict among employees in terms of their task performance, contextual performance and turnover intentions. Utilizing a resource depletion approach in the backdrop of Conservation of Resources theory, it is hypothesized that the three-dimension burnout (exhaustion, cynicism and interpersonal strain) play a mediating role in influencing the linkages between relationship conflict and outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 306 telecom engineers and their supervisors and analyzed using structural equation modeling to test the interrelationships among the study constructs.

Findings

Results indicated that relationship conflict is negatively related to task performance and contextual performance and positively relates to turnover intentions, and that the three dimensions of job burnout, i.e. exhaustion, cynicism and interpersonal strain at work, distinctively mediate the linkages between relationship conflict, task and contextual performance and turnover intentions.

Originality/value

This study explores how relationship conflict transmits its effect to job performance and turnover intentions through mediation of burnout. All in all, the findings have important practical as well as theoretical implications for managers and academicians alike.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Karin Sanders and Birgit Schyns

This study focuses on the relationship between cohesion, consensus in the perception of leadership style of the supervisor within teams and solidarity behaviour of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study focuses on the relationship between cohesion, consensus in the perception of leadership style of the supervisor within teams and solidarity behaviour of employees towards their supervisor (vertical solidarity behaviour) and towards other team members (horizontal solidarity behaviour).

Design/methodology/approach

According to the self‐categorisation theory, which elaborates on the social identity theory, hypotheses for the relationship between consensus in perception within teams, cohesiveness within the teams and vertical and horizontal solidarity behaviour of employees were formulated. The hypotheses were tested in a study with 193 employees within 35 teams in a Dutch Ministry.

Findings

As expected, consensus in leaders' perception and cohesiveness within the team were positively related for transformational leadership style. Results from multi‐level analyses showed, as expected, a positive relationship between cohesiveness and horizontal solidarity behaviour. For vertical solidarity behaviour an interaction effect was found: the relationship between cohesiveness and vertical solidarity behaviour is positive if employees perceive their supervisor as high transformational, but is slightly negative if employees perceive their supervisor as low transformational.

Research limitations/implications

The finding that consensus in transformational leader's perception within teams is related to the cohesiveness of a team support the self‐categorization theory. On the other hand cohesiveness is only related to vertical solidarity behaviour when the supervisor is perceived as high transformational.

Originality/value

The different results mean that it make sense to distinguish between horizontal and vertical solidarity behaviour. In addition, they show the impact of consensus in the perception of leadership style on cohesion.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Karin Sanders and Birgit Schyns

In this introduction of the special issue “Trust, conflict and cooperative behaviour” the focus of the special issue is introduced: because al lot of attitudinal and…

Abstract

Purpose

In this introduction of the special issue “Trust, conflict and cooperative behaviour” the focus of the special issue is introduced: because al lot of attitudinal and behavioural employees' outcomes are based on reciprocity, they should be examined as a characteristic of relationships instead of a characteristic of employees.

Design/methodology approach

On a theoretical level reciprocity within organizations is considered by means of the social embeddedness approach and by means of leader member exchange.

Findings

Although reciprocity in relationships is well recognised in the academic literature seemingly little empirical work has been conducted on reciprocity in manager‐subordinate and subordinate‐subordinate relationships.

Originality/value

In this special issue, we try to fill in this gap and focus on the reciprocity within relationships to explain trust, conflict and cooperative behaviour within organisations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Ferry Koster and Karin Sanders

This paper aims at contributing to the debate on organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB) by developing a theory‐driven measure of cooperative behaviour within…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at contributing to the debate on organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB) by developing a theory‐driven measure of cooperative behaviour within organisations, called organisational solidarity (OS).

Design/methodology/approach

Data are gathered through a survey among 674 employees from nine organisations. Scales are constructed using the multiple group method. OLS regression is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The data analyses show that reciprocity is an important mechanism to bring about cooperation within organisations. Based on this, a distinction is made between horizontal and vertical OS.

Research limitations/implications

The major shortcoming of this research is that some of the results may be influenced by same source bias. The research implies that cooperative types of employee behaviour – such as OCB – depend on the behaviour of others. Furthermore, these kinds of behaviour can be divided into a horizontal and a vertical dimension.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that supervisors can play a facilitating role in creating and sustaining cooperative behaviour of employees.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on OCB by examining how this kind of behaviour is affected by the behaviour of supervisors and co‐workers. Secondly, whereas other articles focus on either horizontal or vertical dimensions of cooperative behaviour, this paper focuses on both dimensions simultaneously.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Aukje Nauta and Karin Sanders

The goal of this study was to examine individual, relational, and organizational determinants of negotiation behavior (problem solving, contending, yielding, and avoiding…

Abstract

The goal of this study was to examine individual, relational, and organizational determinants of negotiation behavior (problem solving, contending, yielding, and avoiding) between planning and marketing departments in manufacturing organizations. Results from a study among 41 managers and 85 planning and marketing employees within 11 firms showed that individual personality, perceived interdepartmental interdependence, and organizational strategy were each related to the negotiation behavior of department members. Desirable negotiation behavior—specifically, the problem‐solving approach—was more likely when individuals were extraverted and agreeable, when employees perceived high interdepartmental interdependence, and when organizations did not have a low‐cost strategy. Contending was more likely when individuals were extraverted and disagreeable, and yielding was more likely when department members perceived a power advantage vis‐à‐vis the other department. All four styles of negotiation behavior were more likely the less the organizations had a low‐cost strategy. These findings provide guidance to organizations in their efforts to encourage constructive negotiation behavior between departments.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Dorien Kooij, Jaap Paauwe and Karin Sanders

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Karin Sanders

This study focuses on the relationship between informal relationships, work ethics and (short‐time) absenteeism. According to self‐categorisation theory, which elaborates…

Abstract

This study focuses on the relationship between informal relationships, work ethics and (short‐time) absenteeism. According to self‐categorisation theory, which elaborates on the social identity theory, hypotheses were formulated for the relationship between consensus in work ethics within teams, informal relationships (cohesiveness) and short‐term absenteeism. The hypotheses were tested within two Dutch organisations: study 1 concerns a housing corporation (n=53, eight teams), and study 2 concerns a nursing home (n=97, nine teams). As expected, consensus in work ethics and cohesiveness within a team were positively related. Results from multi‐level analyses showed as expected, a negative relationship between cohesiveness within a team and short‐term absenteeism of employees. Furthermore, an interaction‐effect was found in the first study, but not in the second: the more cohesive the team, the stronger the relationships between work ethics and short‐term absenteeism. Findings are discussed in terms of recommendations for further research and practical implications.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Karin Sanders, Luc Dorenbosch and Renee de Reuver

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question of whether individual perceptions of an HRM system – distinctiveness, consistency and consensus – and shared…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question of whether individual perceptions of an HRM system – distinctiveness, consistency and consensus – and shared perceptions of HRM (climate strength) are positively related to affective commitment in the organization. In addition, the paper examines if climate strength has a mediating effect in the relationship between the individual perceptions of an HRM system and affective commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey study with data from 671 employees, 67 line‐managers and 32 HR‐managers within four hospitals was used.

Findings

Results of two‐level analyses (department, employee) showed that the perception of distinctiveness, consistency and climate strength, as expected are positively related to affective commitment. Instead of a mediating effect of climate strength a moderator effect was found: the relationship between consistency and affective commitment is stronger when climate strength is high.

Research limitations/implications

The study offers researchers some recommendations to focus on the process of HRM (in terms of distinctiveness, consistency and consensus), and on the importance of shared perceptions within a department.

Originality/value

This study shows the impact of aspects of the process of HRM on the individual level, and shared perceptions of high commitment HRM on the department level on affective commitment of employees.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

Ferry Koster, Frans Stokman, Randy Hodson and Karin Sanders

The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of task and informal networks and their interaction on cooperative types of employee behaviour.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of task and informal networks and their interaction on cooperative types of employee behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies are used to examine the research question. The first dataset consists of book‐length ethnographies providing information at the team level. The second dataset is gathered through a survey across ten different organisations and provides information at the employee level. Both datasets are analysed using OLS regression.

Findings

Cooperative behaviour is positively affected by task and informal interdependence relationships. However, when employees have task and informal interdependence relationships with co‐workers, they may show less cooperative behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

A major limitation of this study is that it was not possible to include information about the structure of the networks in which the employees are embedded. The study provides evidence for the existence of exchange relationships between the employee and the team. Besides that, the study shows the importance of including formal and informal networks to study cooperative behaviour of employees.

Practical implications

The findings provide practical information about how to manage cooperation within teams. Cooperative relationships can be created by either creating task or informal interdependence. Besides that, managers should strike a balance between task and informal interdependence.

Originality/value

Existing research tends to focus on the effects of one type of network on behaviour. This research shows that different networks may affect employee behaviour at the same time.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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