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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Karen Walls

edge ellison is only the second law firm in the UK to receive an accreditation from the Institute of IT Training for its internal IT training programme. The award is based…

Abstract

edge ellison is only the second law firm in the UK to receive an accreditation from the Institute of IT Training for its internal IT training programme. The award is based on an industry Code of Practice and is consistent with the objectives of Investors in People and ISO but goes much deeper into the specialist area of IT training. Only 70 companies in the UK have received accreditation and, of those, only 15 are in‐house training departments. The award recognises the commitment of edge ellison’s Systems Training Department to their 650+ internal clients as providers of high quality, effective IT training.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Abstract

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Strategic HR Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Kevin T. Leicht, Douglas Thompkins, Tina Wildhagen, Christabel L. Rogalin, Shane D. Soboroff, Christopher P. Kelley, Charisse Long and Michael J. Lovaglia

Beginning in 1982, the majority of college students have been women and that majority has increased since. Explanations for the predominance of women in college…

Abstract

Beginning in 1982, the majority of college students have been women and that majority has increased since. Explanations for the predominance of women in college enrollments and completion include a variety of labor-market factors that might now advantage men less than in the past. Avariety of labor-market analyses show that, while some recent developments may have reduced incentives for men to enroll in college, labor-market explanations alone cannot account for the predominance of women in college. Some of the reduced incentives for male college enrollment point to gender identities typical of young men and women as an important explanation for the predominance of women in college. Preliminary evidence for the gender identity explanation is offered. More controlled studies capable of testing and exploring the implications of the gender identity explanation are proposed.

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Social Psychology of Gender
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1430-0

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Kofi Agyekum, Karen Blay and Alex Opoku

Capillary rise of water in buildings has been an issue of concern among past and present researchers. Despite the research efforts devoted to the proper elimination of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Capillary rise of water in buildings has been an issue of concern among past and present researchers. Despite the research efforts devoted to the proper elimination of the problem in masonry construction, it still remains a challenge that needs to be addressed. The purpose of this paper is to explore treatment mechanisms that can be used to prevent rising damp in new building infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 14 test walls are constructed, conditioned, subjected to various treatments and monitored for four years. The treatments applied to the walls include the use of polyethylene damp proof courses, damp proof coatings and dense concrete bases. The walls are then monitored with reference to the two climate seasons in Ghana.

Findings

The results highlight that rising damp is present, as suggested by the constant increase and decrease in the height of the water levels in the walls during the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. The findings further reveal that within the four-year period, the walls treated with the damp proof coatings, together with those with the dense concrete bases performed better than those treated with the polyethylene damp proof courses.

Research limitations/implications

The economic and commercial impact of these preventive mechanisms were not considered in this study. A future research can be directed at these issues.

Practical implications

The proposed treatment mechanisms highlight the effectiveness of some treatments applied to walls to prevent the capillary rise of water from the ground into the superstructure.

Social implications

Building regulations, especially in Ghana and other tropical settings should be amended to include ways to prevent rising damp phenomena by including effective methods against rising damp during the building design or construction.

Originality/value

Series of studies worldwide have been conducted in laboratories to simulate the capillary rise of water in walls of buildings. This is among the few studies that look at how water rises from actual ground conditions into the walls of buildings.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

John Overby, Mike Rayburn, Kevin Hammond and David C. Wyld

The war in Iraq, the threat of terrorism and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic have made international business activities increasingly difficult and…

Abstract

The war in Iraq, the threat of terrorism and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic have made international business activities increasingly difficult and risky. The worldwide economic downturn and slow growth in domestic markets are forcing companies to depend more than ever on overseas trade. SARS emerged in China in November 2002 and has spread to 26 countries. The SARS epidemic has caused the most severe economic crisis in Southeast Asia since the wave of bank failures and currency devaluations that swept the region five years ago. The SARS epidemic has prompted health officials to implement travel advisories and restrictions, in order to defer nonessential travel to regions of Asia with large numbers of SARS cases. They are enforcing quarantine and isolation measures in major cities to try and limit the spread of SARS. The President of the United States has signed an executive order adding SARS to the list of communicable diseases that can be quarantined. A major disruption in China could paralyze just‐in‐time supply chains and cause an economic crisis for retailers and other businesses worldwide. The SARS epidemic has caused many economists to drastically reduce their economic‐growth forecasts for Asia. New infectious diseases, such as SARS, can emerge and easily travel around the globe, infecting less‐resilient hosts and mutating because of the influence of viruses and bacteria in their new environment. Health officials are even more concerned about the pandemic disaster that hasn’t happened, but may still. However, the SARS epidemic has created positive economic benefits for some companies.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Karen Bronikowski

Corporations that continue to downsize through attrition or staff cuts have a fundamental problem. How can they muster the resources to maintain their competitive edge and…

Abstract

Corporations that continue to downsize through attrition or staff cuts have a fundamental problem. How can they muster the resources to maintain their competitive edge and bring new products quickly and profitably into the marketplace? The solution: Eliminate company walls and borders to encourage change.

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Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Amy Klemm Verbos and De Vee E. Dykstra

The purpose of this paper is to explore female business faculty perceptions about attrition from a business school to uncover factors that might assist in female faculty…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore female business faculty perceptions about attrition from a business school to uncover factors that might assist in female faculty retention in business schools.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative study approach and guided by past literature, the paper systematically analyses open-ended responses to interview questions and notes emergent themes.

Findings

The major themes that emerged as factors leading to attrition: first, an exclusionary and managerialist culture which marginalized and demoralized women; second, curtailed career opportunities, including a lack of gender equity in promotion and tenure; third, poor leadership; and fourth, break up of a critical mass of women. The factors then that might assist in female faculty retention are a critical mass of women, gender equity, inclusive, collaborative cultures, psychological safety, and ethical leadership. The career patterns of the women indicated that a labyrinth is an apt metaphor for their career paths.

Research limitations/implications

This research examines just one school from the perspective of women who left. It holds promise as the basis for future studies across business schools and to faculty within business schools to determine whether the emergent themes hold across schools.

Originality/value

This study examines women in business academe through the attraction-selection-attrition framework and by extending the labyrinth career metaphor to an academic setting. The paper also provides a conceptual model of female faculty retention.

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Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Karen Rupp‐Serrano

Literacy has been one of the most publicized societal problems of the past decade, and it is likely to continue as such for some time to come. Like many problems of modern…

Abstract

Literacy has been one of the most publicized societal problems of the past decade, and it is likely to continue as such for some time to come. Like many problems of modern society, it involves a variety of educational, social, and economic factors, and will therefore not be easily solved.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Malin Tillmar

Women’s entrepreneurship is often seen as the solution of both economic growth and gender equality. This is despite academic knowledge of the gendered preconditions for…

Abstract

Purpose

Women’s entrepreneurship is often seen as the solution of both economic growth and gender equality. This is despite academic knowledge of the gendered preconditions for entrepreneurship in many contexts. This paper aims to focus on the gendering of commercial justice, a precondition for entrepreneurship. Informed by gender perspectives on women’s entrepreneurship and previous studies on commercial justice in East Africa, this paper sets out to explore the experiences of urban women entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an interview study with women entrepreneurs and representatives of support organizations in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. The interviews were conducted in Kiswahili, and access was enabled through dialogues with local partner organizations such as the Tanzanian Chamber of Commerce.

Findings

Findings are that with formal legal rights, the informal institutions imply that the marital status of the women, and the attitude of their husbands, is the overarching determinants for the commercial justice perceived as available to them. This has implication for many policy areas, such as entrepreneurship support, women’s empowerment and labour market policy. Theoretically, the findings highlight the importance of studying the informal institutions affecting women’s entrepreneurship around the globe. Concerning commercial justice in particular, three dimensions of gendering are identified.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on a qualitative interview study. Further studies with varying methods are needed to further explore the gendering of commercial justice in Tanzania, East Africa and beyond.

Practical implications

A major practical implication of the study is the insight that business for development, will not automatically lead to business for equality, on a general level. The gender bias is also reproduced in everyday business life, for example, thorough access to commercial justice. Special measures to target the gender equality issue are, therefore, necessary. Another implication of the findings regard the importance of Alternative Dispute Resolution initiatives, affordable to women small and medium enterprise-owners.

Originality/value

While other obstacles to women’s entrepreneurship in the developing contexts have been well explored, the gendering of perceived commercial justice has not received sufficient attention in previous studies. Studies applying a gender theoretical perspective on entrepreneurship in the explored context are still needed.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Karen Hughes and Gianna Moscardo

The purpose of this paper is to speculate how recent and emerging trends in information and communication technology (ICT) could change the way tourism businesses and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to speculate how recent and emerging trends in information and communication technology (ICT) could change the way tourism businesses and organizations communicate with and manage their guests.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies elements of futures and design thinking to analyze current tourism management practices and identify critical touchpoints that link tourist decisions to management strategies.

Findings

Fictional travel stories were used to identify and analyze how technology might affect tourism through five touchpoints– choice, connection, co-creation, customization and compliance. These stories were analyzed to identify changing forces and suggest potential paradigm shifts that tourism managers need to consider. These included increasingly complex content, the importance of compatible connections, and the critical role of coordination and cooperation in future tourism systems.

Originality/value

While there have been numerous discussions of how tourists and tourism businesses access and use technology, there is little evidence of scholars and practitioners applying formal futures thinking to ICT and tourism. This paper used design thinking and stories to predict and illustrate ways in which technology could be embedded into tourism experiences and services. It suggests that technology can, and probably will, fundamentally change the way in which we manage tourists and their experiences.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

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