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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Karen Smith

The purpose of this paper is to examine the discursive rationalities shaping Irish child policy, with a particular focus on the rationality of “better with less” and its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the discursive rationalities shaping Irish child policy, with a particular focus on the rationality of “better with less” and its association with an intensified focus on the early years. In the aftermath of the global financial crisis there was a shift towards universal provision of early years services as part of the better with less agenda – the paper critically examines the assumptions which shaped this policy reform.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on analysis of the texts of the two national child policy plans produced to date in Ireland – The Children, Their Lives 2000–2010 and Better Outcomes, Brighter Futures 2014–2020.

Findings

Ireland adopted its first national children’s strategy The Children, Their Lives in 2000, associated with an initial shift to a more technocratic, investment-oriented approach to policy making. The emphasis on economic returns is more strongly evident in the successor adopted in 2014. Informed by the “better with less” agenda Better Outcomes, Brighter Futures has a strong focus on early years provision as offering the most significant potential for returns, particularly in relation to “disadvantaged” children. This position not only objectifies children but is associated with a set of assumptions about the nature of “disadvantage” and those affected by it which ignores the wider context of unequal social, political and economic relations.

Originality/value

National children’s strategies have not been explicitly looked at previously as a form of governmentalization of government and there has been limited analysis to date in Ireland or elsewhere of the better with less agenda in the context of child policy, gaps which this paper seeks to address.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 39 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Amalina Andrade and Karen A. Smith

This paper investigates tourism distribution channels in a small island destination with capacity constraints and contributes to understanding distribution in an emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates tourism distribution channels in a small island destination with capacity constraints and contributes to understanding distribution in an emerging economy. Using the case of Fernando de Noronha in Brazil, the structures and factors underlying channel choice behaviour of tourism suppliers and intermediaries were investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

41 in-depth interviews were conducted with the private sector (tourism suppliers based on Fernando de Noronha and intermediaries, based on the island as well as mainland Brazil) as well as governmental organisations. A stratified purposeful sample was taken to select suppliers and data were examined based on thematic analysis.

Findings

Both direct and indirect distribution channels are used, with limited airline tickets influencing the suppliers' choice of channels in this small island and capacity-constrained destination. Many suppliers focused on relationships with destination-based ground operators. These local intermediaries are important and extremely relevant to small island destinations building an effective business network to connect the destination to geographically distant markets and intermediaries.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the absence of air and cruise operators as interviewees.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comprehensive representation of the structures and analysis of tourism distribution channels in fragile small island destinations, specifically, in an emerging country context. This includes emphasising previously unexplored indirect channels of cruise ship operators and supplier's associations.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Kate Daellenbach, Ciahn Dalgliesh-Waugh and Karen A. Smith

This study aims to better understand the micro–meso–macro perspective in social marketing, through the examination of a transformative, primarily meso-level initiative…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to better understand the micro–meso–macro perspective in social marketing, through the examination of a transformative, primarily meso-level initiative aimed at developing more resilient communities in the face of disaster.

Design/methodology/approach

Research was oriented around two cases of community resilience planning. Relevant documents were reviewed, and a series of semi-structured interviews with the manager and advisors in an emergency management office were conducted, followed by in-depth interviews with 15 individual community participants.

Findings

The findings suggest a multilevel (micro–meso–macro) model of social change, incorporating fluid and interactive movement between the levels. In the context examined, community leaders were initially motivated to be involved due to their role, sense of altruism and curiosity. Their motivation to continue was encouraged, as misconceptions around emergency response were addressed and the value of community connections was highlighted. As planning progressed, greater involvement and empowerment resulted.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in its focus on two communities, and the context of emergency preparation and response. However, it contributes insights into a leading initiative designed to help build community resilience and insights into a micro–meso–macro perspective of social change.

Practical implications

The study also suggests that social marketers, when implementing a meso-level initiative, will benefit from considering multiple levels, seeking the involvement and cooperation of meso-level leaders which will help facilitate downstream change.

Originality/value

Contributing to the discussion of the micro–meso–macro levels of social marketing, this research examines disaster preparation and response – a context not frequently examined in social marketing. Findings suggest that interactive, multi-level thinking, especially considering the individual implementers of meso-level change as a “target market”, will benefit social well-being initiatives.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Samantha Lynch and Karen Smith

This paper seeks to provide an insight into the recruitment and selection of volunteers in the heritage sector, drawing comparisons between paid and unpaid workers to…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an insight into the recruitment and selection of volunteers in the heritage sector, drawing comparisons between paid and unpaid workers to assess the implications of the findings for volunteer management.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐method research design was adopted involving qualitative interviews with managers and volunteers, in conjunction with a postal survey of volunteers across 12 study sites, which were all visitor attractions in the heritage sector.

Findings

The findings show that the effectiveness of the recruitment and selection process can be undermined by a lack of formality and supporting resources. This raises questions about the effectiveness of human resource management for volunteers, both specifically in the heritage sector and in the wider context of volunteer management.

Research limitations/implications

The research was of an exploratory nature and so further investigation is needed to consider the impact of these findings on the effectiveness of volunteer recruitment and selection across a range of sectors.

Practical implications

The research highlights the existing practices in place for volunteer management in the heritage sector so raising issues for managers regarding the challenge of achieving a balance between formality and informality of human resource management practices.

Originality/value

The research takes a micro‐level approach to examining the recruitment and selection of volunteer workers. It provides a link in the literature between the management of volunteers and human resource management practices.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 6 November 1992

Karen Horny

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-616-8

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Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2013

Karen Smith

This chapter explores the use of critical discourse analysis (CDA) within higher education research. CDA is an approach to studying language and its relation to power…

Abstract

This chapter explores the use of critical discourse analysis (CDA) within higher education research. CDA is an approach to studying language and its relation to power, ideology and inequality. Within CDA, texts are not analysed in isolation, but as part of the institutional and discoursal practices in which they are embedded. Within the broad field of educational research, CDA has been increasingly used to explore the relationship between language and society; higher education research appears to be experiencing a similar turn to CDA. The chapter begins with an overview of CDA, outlining its origins, and discussing its position as both a theory and a method. A review of CDA-related higher education research follows. The review aims to show the scope and potential of CDA in the study of higher education. The chapter closes with recommendations for future work to develop and extend the use of CDA within higher education research.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Researchh
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-682-8

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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Penelope Carroll, Karen Witten, Melody Smith, Victoria Egli, Suzanne Mavoa and Marketta Kytta

The overarching aim of our research is the social and environmental sustainability of cities, with a focus on ensuring the rights and needs of the children who live in…

Abstract

The overarching aim of our research is the social and environmental sustainability of cities, with a focus on ensuring the rights and needs of the children who live in them are considered in policy and planning arenas. How do we, as researchers, work ethically and effectively with children to foreground their voices and produce robust evidence to inform policies and processes which promote their wellbeing in child-friendly cities, and in line with Sustainable Development Goals? Children have the right to be heard, and their views taken seriously, in policy and planning arenas. Conducting ethical and effective child-centred research requires balancing considerations of children’s rights to genuine participation and their rights to protection at all stages of the research process. This balance requires methodological flexibility and a situated ethical approach, where researchers and participants together determine appropriate research pathways. In this chapter, the authors reflect on ethical and methodological insights gained during a decade of conducting urban-related research with children. The various projects used different methods and provided different lessons; but common to all was an understanding of the importance of relationship-building, of supportive and engaged adults, and of methods which were respectful, age/culturally appropriate and ‘fit for purpose’. These factors are crucial to ethically enable the foregrounding of children’s voices, the collection of robust data and effective dissemination of research with children.

Details

Ethics and Integrity in Research with Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-401-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Penny Smith, Julie Bennetts and Karen Pavey

As part of a general move to community care and concurrent closure of a 280 bedded hospital, West Dorset Health Authority, as an interim measure two years ago, moved 17…

Abstract

As part of a general move to community care and concurrent closure of a 280 bedded hospital, West Dorset Health Authority, as an interim measure two years ago, moved 17 clients with severe learning difficulties and challenging behaviours to three smaller residential units together with two ladies who also showed frequent challenging behaviours. As part of a continuing evaluation of the quality of provision for this group of clients, the authors looked at the present levels of skills of the residents compared with those in evidence three years ago when the 17 were on a secure ward with attendance at a special day care unit. In addition, measures were taken of engagement levels and of the number and type (whether positive or negative) of interactions between staff and residents. For all parameters, significant improvements were evident, supporting the view that small units facilitate the learning of new skills and provide a better quality of life for the residents.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Gina L. Miller, Naresh K. Malhotra and Tracey M. King

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Karen Prior‐Smith and Mary Perrin

Documents Hewlett‐Packard’s (HP’s) systematic approach to benchmarking, as an integral part of its total quality system. Describes the organization’s IMPACT project which…

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11025

Abstract

Documents Hewlett‐Packard’s (HP’s) systematic approach to benchmarking, as an integral part of its total quality system. Describes the organization’s IMPACT project which was born out of corporate priorities to find specific ways and means of improving customer satisfaction after a survey revealed that there were improvement priorities to be considered. Claims that through internal process analysis and an externally motivated expedition to learn about best practice, the HP benchmarking team have successfully brought about changes and new learning which have led to various benefits such as a new complaint system with effective outcomes and with less rework, the development of a formal recognition system.

Details

Business Process Re-engineering & Management Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2503

Keywords

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