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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Lori Weeks and Karen Roberto

Although older women are at disproportionate risk of falling and becoming injured, little is known about the effect of falling on their quality of life. In this…

Abstract

Although older women are at disproportionate risk of falling and becoming injured, little is known about the effect of falling on their quality of life. In this qualitative study, we examined the perceived causes of falling among older women, identified how older women's quality of life is influenced by falls, and explored how women can be empowered to prevent falls from occurring in their lives. Women who participated in focus groups indicated that the consequences of falling ranged in severity and duration and encompassed physical and psychosocial domains. The women took some ownership of preventing falls in their lives and believed that falls were caused by factors in the physical environment and personal health factors and practices. The results allow us to gain insight into the consequences of falls on the lives of older women, and that older women can influence change by preventing falls from occurring in their lives.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Jennifer Scanlon‐Mogel and Karen Roberto

Using a life course perspective, we identified perceived events, transitions and trajectories in older adults' lives that contributed to and inhibited continuous…

Abstract

Using a life course perspective, we identified perceived events, transitions and trajectories in older adults' lives that contributed to and inhibited continuous participation in physical activities and exercise at three stages of their lives (ie, young adulthood, middle adulthood, late adulthood). In‐depth interviews with nine men and six women provided an understanding of how societal processes and opportunities, life course roles and transitions and individual meanings of physical exercise influenced the older adults' perceptions of and current participation in physical activity and exercise.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Sukwon Kim, Thurmon Lockhart and Karen Roberto

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of participating in an eight‐week physical training (ie. balance or weight training) on psychosocial outcomes for…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of participating in an eight‐week physical training (ie. balance or weight training) on psychosocial outcomes for independently living healthy older adults. Eighteen older adults (65 years old or older) voluntarily participated in this study. Participants were randomly and evenly distributed in three different groups such as balance, weight or control group; six participants in each. Fear of falling and social activity levels were statistically tested by evaluating questionnaires validated in previous studies. Psychological factors improved in all groups after eight weeks (P < 0.05). Social interaction levels did not improve in any of the three groups, although all participants exhibited improvements in being physically independent (P < 0.05). Results suggested that being physically active as well as being socially active could result in being less fearful of falls, more confident of leaving residency, being more independent, and being more active.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Ron Iphofen

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Ron Iphofen

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2017

Xuan Santos and Christopher Bickel

In 1987, the City of Los Angeles instituted the first gang injunction in the country. Gang injunctions are pursued through the civil courts to seriously restrict the…

Abstract

Purpose

In 1987, the City of Los Angeles instituted the first gang injunction in the country. Gang injunctions are pursued through the civil courts to seriously restrict the activities and movement of suspected gang members and affiliates. People who have been served with a gang injunction are often prohibited from everyday activities, such as wearing sports jerseys, talking to other gang members, and being out in public past curfew, regardless of age. Though often justified by law enforcement as a necessary tool to fight gang violence, we argue that gang injunctions are similar to Slave Codes, Black Codes, and Jim Crow laws, which established a separate system of justice based on race. As such, gang injunctions serve as an extension of an apartheid-like system of justice that seriously limits the life opportunities of people of color within gang injunction territories.

Methodology/approach

This chapter draws upon the oral histories of people targeted by gang injunction laws within California, paying particular attention to how gang-identified individuals are surveiled, controlled, and confined.

Findings

Gang injunctions operate on an apartheid-like justice system that punishes perceived gang members harsher than non-gang members. These laws affirm the legal tactics that maintain racial boundaries and promote a system of justice that mirrors the Black Codes following the end of slavery. The evidence suggests that gang injunctions solely target low-income youth of color, who have been identified as gang members and served with injunctions.

Originality/value

Despite the ubiquity of gang injunctions within California, there is little research on gang injunctions, and even less literature on how these injunctions shape the life course of suspected gang members. We attempt to address this gap in the literature by showing how gang injunctions are not simply about fighting crime, but rather they are a tool used to control and corral communities of color.

Details

Race, Ethnicity and Law
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-604-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Sameer Deshpande, Samia Chreim, Roberto Bello and Terry Ross Evashkevich

The purpose of this paper is to explore relationships that seniors (aged 55 and above) experience with prescription pharmaceutical brands, thus attending to situations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore relationships that seniors (aged 55 and above) experience with prescription pharmaceutical brands, thus attending to situations where consumers have limited control over brand choice.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological study was conducted involving interviews with seniors in two Canadian cities. Phenomenology relies on a small number of interviews that are analyzed in depth and describes the lived consumer experience. Data analysis focused on types of relationships participants had experienced with brands and factors that influenced relationships.

Findings

Analysis reveals four types of relationships that seniors hold with prescription pharmaceutical brands. The interpersonal relationship metaphor of arranged marriages can be used to describe relationship forms that seniors develop with brands. The quality of relationship seniors have with prescribing physician, who acts as marriage broker, and brand attributes influence relationships with prescription pharmaceutical brands. Consumer's ethos and nature of illness also influence brand relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides insights into brand choice situations where consumers have low control and addresses impact of intermediaries on consumer experiences. It opens the way for further research on mediated brand relationships.

Practical implications

Marketing managers need to understand the role of intermediaries, where applicable, in influencing consumer relationships with brands.

Originality/value

The study closes a gap in academic research (which is sparse) on relationships with prescription pharmaceutical brands held by consumers – specifically older consumers. It also encourages a critical view of the arranged marriage metaphor as a means of understanding consumer‐brand interactions.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Jose O. Diaz and Karen R. Diaz

“When James Boswell returned from a tour of Corsica in 1765 he wrote: ‘It is indeed amazing that an island so considerable, and in which such noble things have been doing…

105

Abstract

“When James Boswell returned from a tour of Corsica in 1765 he wrote: ‘It is indeed amazing that an island so considerable, and in which such noble things have been doing, should be so imperfectly known.’ The same might be said today of Puerto Rico.” Thus began Millard Hansen and Henry Wells in the foreword to their 1953 look at Puerto Rico's democratic development. Four decades later, the same could again be said about the island.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2021

Abstract

Details

Social Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-790-6

Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Karen Gordon

Families who left their homes in Central America and Mexico searching for a better life in the United States often left their children behind until they were financially…

Abstract

Families who left their homes in Central America and Mexico searching for a better life in the United States often left their children behind until they were financially secure enough to send for them. The children usually waited years to reunite with their parents while many never made the voyage. The children’s emotional stories are conveyed in their own words detailing how vulnerable they felt when abandoned, confused, and at times, rejected after finally connecting with their long-lost families. The psychological trauma for the parents, and especially for their children, is documented via the children’s voices.

Details

Conflict and Forced Migration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-394-9

Keywords

1 – 10 of 36