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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Graham Dickson and Karen Owen

Abstract

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Leadership in Health Services, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Graham Dickson and Karen Owen

Abstract

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Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Karen Owen and Graham Dickson

Abstract

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Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Ann LN Chapman, David Johnson and Karen Kilner

The purpose of this study was to determine the predominant leadership styles used by medical leaders and factors influencing leadership style use. Clinician leadership is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine the predominant leadership styles used by medical leaders and factors influencing leadership style use. Clinician leadership is important in healthcare delivery and service development. The use of different leadership styles in different contexts can influence individual and organisational effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was used, combining a questionnaire distributed electronically to 224 medical leaders in acute hospital trusts with in-depth “critical incident” interviews with six medical leaders. Questionnaire responses were analysed quantitatively to determine, first, the overall frequency of use of six predefined leadership styles and, second, individual leadership style based on a consultative/decision-making paradigm. Interviews were analysed thematically using both a confirmatory approach with predefined leadership styles as themes, and also an inductive grounded theory approach exploring influencing factors.

Findings

Leaders used a range of styles, the predominant styles being democratic, affiliative and authoritative. Although leaders varied in their decision-making authority and consultative tendency, virtually all leaders showed evidence of active leadership. Organisational culture, context, individual propensity and “style history” emerged during the inductive analysis as important factors in determining use of leadership styles by medical leaders.

Practical implications

The outcomes of this evaluation are useful for leadership development at the level of the individual, organisation and wider National Health Service (NHS).

Originality/value

This study adds to the very limited evidence base on patterns of leadership style use in medical leadership and reports a novel conceptual framework of factors influencing leadership style use by medical leaders.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Geraldine R. MacCarrick

This paper aims to describe the educational philosophy and practice underpinning the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators (RACMA) program and how it is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the educational philosophy and practice underpinning the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators (RACMA) program and how it is aligned with the needs of the Australian and New Zealand health care systems. Preparing future doctors as medical leaders requires keeping pace with developments in medical education and increased sophistication on the part of teaching and supervising faculty.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a descriptive case study. The data are complemented by workforce data and excerpts from the RACMA Management and Leadership Curriculum.

Findings

The RACMA has developed a program informed by current best practices in medical education. The educational underpinnings and instructional practices of the RACMA emphasize leadership as a collaborative social process and the importance of relational leadership in successful modern day practice. The ongoing development of the program has a focus on setting of clear learning objectives, regular and continuous feedback to trainees and reflective practice facilitated by the close relationship between trainees and their preceptor.

Research limitations/implications

Although a site-specific case study, the application of relational models of teaching can be applied in other settings.

Practical implications

The application of relational models of teaching can be applied in other settings.

Social implications

This paper fulfils a social need to describe successful competency models used for medical leadership development.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to define competency models used as a foundation for medical leadership development.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Peter Angood and Diane Shannon

This paper aims to present the argument that effective physician leadership is needed to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare delivery in the USA and around…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the argument that effective physician leadership is needed to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare delivery in the USA and around the world.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an in-depth literature review, interviews with physician leaders and a study of the competencies required for physicians to successfully lead healthcare organizations.

Findings

The paper finds that a clear need exists for training to improve specific leadership competencies among physicians, regardless of their career stage or career path.

Research limitations/implications

Limited research has been conducted on the value of physician leadership and its impact on quality outcomes and patient safety.

Practical implications

This paper establishes the need for physician leadership in healthcare organizations.

Social implications

This paper will influence public attitudes within the healthcare sphere on the value that physician leaders can bring to healthcare.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils a need for more study on the impact that physician leadership brings to quality and patient care, and establishes the need for physician leaders to obtain specific leadership competencies.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Stanley J. Smits, Dawn Bowden, Judith A. Falconer and Dale C. Strasser

– This paper aims to present a two-decade effort to improve team functioning and patient outcomes in inpatient stroke rehabilitation settings.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a two-decade effort to improve team functioning and patient outcomes in inpatient stroke rehabilitation settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The principal improvement effort was conducted over a nine-year period in 50 Veterans Administration Hospitals in the USA. A comprehensive team-based model was developed and tested in a series of empirical studies. A leadership development intervention was used to improve team functioning, and a follow-up cluster-randomized trial documented patient outcome improvements associated with the leadership training.

Findings

Iterative team and leadership improvements are presented in summary form, and a set of practice-proven development observations are derived from the results. Details are also provided on the leadership training intervention that improved teamwork processes and resulted in improvements in patient outcomes that could be linked to the intervention itself.

Research limitations/implications

The practice-proven development observations are connected to leadership development theory and applied in the form of suggestions to improve leadership development and teamwork in a broad array of medical treatment settings.

Practical implications

This paper includes suggestions for leadership improvement in medical treatment settings using interdisciplinary teams to meet the customized needs of the patient populations they serve.

Originality/value

The success of the team effectiveness model and the team-functioning domains provides a framework and best practice for other health care organizations seeking to improve teamwork effectiveness.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Andi Sebastian, Liz Fulop, Ann Dadich, Anneke Fitzgerald, Louise Kippist and Anne Smyth

The purpose of this paper is to call for strong medical co-leadership in transforming the Australian health system. The paper discusses how Health LEADS Australia, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to call for strong medical co-leadership in transforming the Australian health system. The paper discusses how Health LEADS Australia, the Australian health leadership framework, offers an opportunity to engage medical clinicians and doctors in the leadership of health services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first discusses the nature of medical leadership and its associated challenges. The paper argues that medical leaders have a key role in the design, implementation and evaluation of healthcare reforms, and in translating these reforms for their colleagues. Second, this paper describes the origins and nature of Health LEADS Australia. Third, this paper discusses the importance of the goal of Health LEADS Australia and suggests the evidence-base underpinning the five foci in shaping medical leadership education and professional development. This paper concludes with suggestions on how Health LEADS Australia might be evaluated.

Findings

For the well-being of the Australian health system, doctors need to play an important role in the kind of leadership that makes measurable differences in the retention of clinical professions; improves organisational cultures; enhances the engagement of consumers and their careers; is associated with better patient and public health outcomes; effectively addresses health inequalities; balances cost effectiveness with improved quality and safety; and is sustainable.

Originality/value

This is the first article addressing Health LEADS Australia and medical leadership. Australia is actively engaging in a national approach to health leadership. Discussions about the mechanisms and intentions of this are valuable in both national and global health leadership discourses.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Anita Joanne Snell, Chris Eagle and John Emile Van Aerde

– The purpose of this conceptual paper is to provide strategies on how to embed physician leadership development efforts within health organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to provide strategies on how to embed physician leadership development efforts within health organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Findings from our previous research, which include an extensive literature review and analysis of 53 interviews with representatives from healthcare organizations across the globe, are integrated within the context of the Influencer© framework to provide a useful and grounded tool for physician leadership development strategies.

Findings

Physician leadership development strategies are identified for each of the six domains within the Influencer© framework.

Practical implications

A number of physician leadership development strategies are provided. They can be used in combination or used independently.

Originality/value

Integrating the knowledge gained from practices in health organizations and from the literature within the Influencer© framework is a unique approach and strengthens the usefulness of the identified physician leadership development strategies.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Jason Micallef and Brodene Straw

– This paper aims to provide an overview of the design and initial outcomes of a leadership and service improvement program for junior medical staff.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of the design and initial outcomes of a leadership and service improvement program for junior medical staff.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the rationale, initial set-up, structure, program outcomes and future directions of the Medical Service Improvement Program for junior doctors. This program is a recent initiative of the Western Australian public healthcare system.

Findings

The Medical Service Improvement Program illustrates a successful approach to developing junior doctors to lead improvements in health service delivery. The program has resulted in tangible personal outcomes for participants, in addition to important organisational outcomes.

Practical implications

This paper provides an evidence-based structured approach to developing the leadership abilities of junior medical staff. It provides practical information on the design of the leadership program that aligns the participant learning outcomes to postgraduate medical competencies. The program has demonstrated clear service outcomes, confirming that junior medical staff is both capable and committed to leading service improvement and reform.

Originality/value

This paper provides clear evidence for the benefits of providing dedicated non-clinical time for junior medical staff to lead quality and improvement initiatives. This case study will assist hospital administrators, postgraduate education units and those involved in designing and administering clinical leadership development programs.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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