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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Julie Ridley, Karen Newbigging and Cathy Street

The purpose of this paper is to address a knowledge gap on advocacy outcomes from mental health service users’ perspective, and the implications for evaluating advocacy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a knowledge gap on advocacy outcomes from mental health service users’ perspective, and the implications for evaluating advocacy impact. The studies discussed highlight challenges for measuring the outcomes of advocacy, but underline the importance of doing so, and of involving service users alongside other stakeholders in co-designing evaluation systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses findings from three qualitative studies of independent advocacy involving focus groups and interviews with: 30 African and African Caribbean men who were mental health service users; 90 “qualifying patients” in a study of Independent Mental Health Advocate services; and nine young women in children and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS).

Findings

A comparative analysis and synthesis of findings from three studies identifies four common dimensions: how mental health advocacy is conceptualised and understood; how service users define advocacy outcomes; wider impacts; and, user involvement in evaluating advocacy outcomes. Advocacy outcomes were conceptualised as increasing involvement, changing care and treatment and supporting personal development. There was evidence of advocacy acting to empower mental health service users, and of broader impacts on service regimes and policies. However, there was limited evidence of transformational impact. Evaluating advocacy outcomes is increasingly seen as important.

Originality/value

Few researchers have focused primarily on the perspectives of people using independent mental health advocacy, or on the experience of “advocacy as empowerment”, and none have done so across diverse groups. This analysis adds insight into the impact of independent advocacy. Data from empirical studies attest to the important role independent advocacy plays in modern mental health systems.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Karen Newbigging

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Karen Newbigging

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Karen Newbigging and Hilary Rowland

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Karen Newbigging

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2009

Ajit Shah, Natalie Banner, Karen Newbigging, Chris Heginbotham and Bill Fulford

The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) was fully implemented in October 2007 in England and Wales. This article reports on two similar, but separate, pilot questionnaire…

Abstract

The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) was fully implemented in October 2007 in England and Wales. This article reports on two similar, but separate, pilot questionnaire studies that examined the experience of consultants in old age psychiatry and consultants in other psychiatric specialities in the early implementation of the MCA pertaining to issues relevant to black and minority ethnic (BME) groups. Fifty‐two (27%) of the 196 consultants in old age psychiatry and 113 (12%) of the 955 consultants in other psychiatric specialities returned useable questionnaires. Eighty per cent or more of the consultants in old age psychiatry and consultants in other psychiatric specialities gave consideration to religion and culture and ethnicity in the assessment of decision‐making capacity (DMC). Almost 50% of the consultants in old age psychiatry reported that half or more of the patients lacking fluency in English or where English was not their first language received an assessment of DMC with the aid of an interpreter and 40% of the consultants in other psychiatric specialities reported that no such patients received an assessment of DMC with the aid of an interpreter.The low rate of using interpreters is of concern. The nature of the consideration and implementation of factors relevant to culture, ethnicity and religion in the application of the MCA and the precise reasons for the low rate of using interpreters in patients lacking fluency in English or English not being their first language require clarification in further studies.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

1 – 10 of 23