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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Karen J. Jansen

This paper proposes that organizations have a characteristic level of change describing the amount and tempo of change an organization typically exhibits. The level of…

Abstract

This paper proposes that organizations have a characteristic level of change describing the amount and tempo of change an organization typically exhibits. The level of change is held in place by a combination of individual, leadership, and organizational factors. It becomes part of the organizational context and is difficult to modify. The paper explores some key determinants and consequences of a characteristic level of change, including the limitations it creates for taking strategic action.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2011

Volume 19 of Research in Organizational Change and Development includes chapters by an international diverse set of authors including Michael Beer, Victor J. Friedman…

Abstract

Volume 19 of Research in Organizational Change and Development includes chapters by an international diverse set of authors including Michael Beer, Victor J. Friedman, Luis Felipe Gómez and Dawna I. Ballard, Ethan S. Bernstein and Frank J. Barrett, Karen J. Jansen and David A. Hofmann, Guido Maes and Geert Van Hootegem, Tobias Fredberg, Flemming Norrgren and Abraham B. (Rami) Shani, and William A. Pasmore. The ideas expressed by these authors are as diverse as their backgrounds.

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Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-022-3

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2011

Karen J. Jansen and David A. Hofmann

In a series of studies, we develop and validate an approach to studying momentum fluctuations over the course of organizational change to better understand the dynamics of…

Abstract

In a series of studies, we develop and validate an approach to studying momentum fluctuations over the course of organizational change to better understand the dynamics of change processes. The first study experimentally examines momentum fluctuations in a controlled change context and explores individual predictors of variance in momentum. The second study utilizes a real organizational setting, examining organizationally relevant predictors of momentum variance and the ability of momentum trends to predict meaningful organizational outcomes. Combined results provide evidence that momentum mapping is a valid approach for researchers and managers exploring processes that unfold over time.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-022-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Bernard J. Jansen, Karen J. Jansen and Amanda Spink

The web is now a significant component of the recruitment and job search process. However, very little is known about how companies and job seekers use the web, and the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The web is now a significant component of the recruitment and job search process. However, very little is known about how companies and job seekers use the web, and the ultimate effectiveness of this process. The specific research questions guiding this study are: how do people search for job‐related information on the web? How effective are these searches? And how likely are job seekers to find an appropriate job posting or application?

Design/methodology/approach

The data used to examine these questions come from job seekers submitting job‐related queries to a major web search engine at three points in time over a five‐year period.

Findings

Results indicate that individuals seeking job information generally submit only one query with several terms and over 45 percent of job‐seeking queries contain a specific location reference. Of the documents retrieved, findings suggest that only 52 percent are relevant and only 40 percent of job‐specific searches retrieve job postings.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides an important contribution to web research and online recruiting literature. The data come from actual web searches, providing a realistic glimpse into how job seekers are actually using the web.

Practical implications

The results of this research can assist organizations in seeking to use the web as part of their recruiting efforts, in designing corporate recruiting web sites, and in developing web systems to support job seeking and recruiting.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first studies to investigate job searching on the web using longitudinal real world data.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2011

Abstract

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-022-3

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2011

Dawna I. Ballard (PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2002) is associate professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Texas at…

Abstract

Dawna I. Ballard (PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2002) is associate professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research examines organizational temporality, with particular attention to ways in which time shapes and is shaped by a range of communication processes. Her published research appears in outlets such as Communication Research, Communication Monographs, Small Group Research, Management Communication Quarterly, as well as several interdisciplinary edited volumes, including Time and Memory, Workplace Temporalities, and Time in Organizational Research.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-022-3

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2017

Karen Nokes and Gerard P. Hodgkinson

Policy-capturing is an experimental technique potentially capable of providing powerful insights into the cognitive bases of work-related decision processes by revealing…

Abstract

Policy-capturing is an experimental technique potentially capable of providing powerful insights into the cognitive bases of work-related decision processes by revealing actors’ “implicit” models of the problem at hand, thereby opening up the “black box” of managerial and organizational cognition. This chapter considers the strengths and weaknesses of policy-capturing vis-à-vis alternative approaches that seek to capture, in varying ways, the inner workings of people’s minds as they make decisions. It then outlines the critical issues that need to be addressed when designing policy-capturing studies and offers practical advice to would-be users concerning some of the common pitfalls of the technique and ways of avoiding them.

Details

Methodological Challenges and Advances in Managerial and Organizational Cognition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-677-0

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Ignas Kalpokas

Abstract

Details

Malleable, Digital, and Posthuman
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-621-7

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Elze G. Ufkes, Ellen Giebels, Sabine Otten and Karen I. van der Zee

The last decades, neighborhood mediation programs have become an increasingly popular method to deal with conflicts between neighbors. In the current paper the aim is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The last decades, neighborhood mediation programs have become an increasingly popular method to deal with conflicts between neighbors. In the current paper the aim is to propose and show that conflict asymmetry, the degree to which parties differ in perceptions of the level of conflict, may be important for the course and outcomes of neighborhood mediation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for testing the hypotheses were based on coding all (261) files of neighbor conflicts reported to a Dutch neighborhood mediation program in the period from 2006 through 2008.

Findings

As expected, cases were more often about asymmetrical than symmetrical conflicts. Moreover, compared to symmetrical conflicts, asymmetrical conflicts less often led to a mediation session; the degree of escalation was lower; and, particularly in asymmetrical conflicts, a mere intake session already contributed to positive conflict outcomes.

Originality/value

Past research on the effectiveness of mediation programs mainly focused on cases in which a mediation session effectively took place. However, persuading parties to participate in a mediation session forms a major challenge for mediators. In fact, many cases that are signed‐up for mediation programs do not result in an actual mediation. The current study examines the entire mediation process – from intake to follow‐up.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2013

Sarah H. Theimer

Quality, an abstract concept, requires concrete definition in order to be actionable. This chapter moves the quality discussion from the theoretical to the workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

Quality, an abstract concept, requires concrete definition in order to be actionable. This chapter moves the quality discussion from the theoretical to the workplace, building steps needed to manage quality issues.

Methodology

The chapter reviews general data studies, web quality studies, and metadata quality studies to identify and define dimensions of data quality and quantitative measures for each concept. The chapter reviews preferred communication methods which make findings meaningful to administrators.

Practical implications

The chapter describes how quality dimensions are practically applied. It suggests criteria necessary to identify high priority populations, and resources in core subject areas or formats, as quality does not have to be completely uniform. The author emphasizes examining the information environment, documenting practice, and developing measurement standards. The author stresses that quality procedures must rapidly evolve to reflect local expectations, the local information environment, technology capabilities, and national standards.

Originality/value

This chapter combines theory with practical application. It stresses the importance of metadata and recognizes quality as a cyclical process which balances the necessity of national standards, the needs of the user, and the work realities of the metadata staff. This chapter identifies decision points, outlines future action, and explains communication options.

Details

New Directions in Information Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-559-3

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