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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Tonya L. Horn and Jennifer S. McCleary

Karen people from Burma are a new population in resettlement countries. While research increasingly documents their health needs, few studies describe how health-care providers…

Abstract

Purpose

Karen people from Burma are a new population in resettlement countries. While research increasingly documents their health needs, few studies describe how health-care providers adapt their practices to serve this group. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of providers who work with Karen patients/clients in health settings, documenting the challenges they face, how they adapt their practice and recommendations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a qualitative survey and one phone interview with a total of 20 providers who had first-hand experience caring for Karen people in health settings. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Findings

Two main categories described challenges providers faced in working with Karen people in health settings: system-level challenges and interpersonal communication challenges. Five main categories described specific strategies and support needed to adapt practice for Karen patients in health settings: strategies for improving communication and mutual understanding; partnering with Karen staff, interpreters and cultural brokers; strategies for building trust and rapport; addressing needs related to case management, care coordination and social determinants of health; recommendations for provider training.

Originality/value

This paper contributes suggestions for adapting practice to meet the health needs of Karen people from the perspective of health-care providers in a location that is nationally recognized for its excellence in refugee health.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2023

Debasisha Mishra

This study aims to develop a model for coordination and communication overhead in distributed software development through case study analysis in the Indian outsourcing software…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a model for coordination and communication overhead in distributed software development through case study analysis in the Indian outsourcing software industry. The model is based on business knowledge, which can be classified as domain, regulatory, strategic, business process and operation process knowledge as per existing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Double case study method was used to verify an existing knowledge–management framework of software development from the literature. The stakeholders of both the cases were interviewed, and project documents were verified to reach conclusions.

Findings

The findings supported the business knowledge classification from the literature. The concept can be used to analyze the software project in a distributed environment.

Research limitations/implications

The research work findings are based only on two case studies. The study findings cannot be generalized and should be used as a learning tool. There can be large variations of project characteristics with differences in business knowledge requirements. The research shows the importance of business knowledge transfer in global software development.

Practical implications

Projects managers in the distributed software development environment can use the findings in project planning and work allocation for better control over cost and schedule, etc.

Originality/value

There is little research works attempted to study the business knowledge classification in the global software industry making the research novel.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

James R. Parrott

Reference departments across North America have been struggling in recent years with a “reference crisis.” This crisis is characterized by too much demand for service, too many…

Abstract

Reference departments across North America have been struggling in recent years with a “reference crisis.” This crisis is characterized by too much demand for service, too many low‐level and repetitive questions, not enough time to answer more challenging questions properly, too few staff to give service at all hours when it is needed, and so on. At the same time, there is a growing concern with the quality of reference service being provided. Reference departments are being exhorted to evaluate the quality of their reference service and to take measures, if necessary, to bring it up to an acceptable standard. But these two issues, the reference crisis and reference evaluation, are related. No amount of staff training or job rotation can improve the standard of reference if the problems associated with the reference crisis are not addressed as well.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Roger Ottewill, Paul Riddy and Karen Fill

To illustrate the nature, range and variety of international networks linking individuals and institutions and reflecting the globalisation of higher education and desire of

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Abstract

Purpose

To illustrate the nature, range and variety of international networks linking individuals and institutions and reflecting the globalisation of higher education and desire of educators with common interests to shed their parochialism and communicate and collaborate on aspects of academic practice across national boundaries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on their personal experiences of securing European Union funding for establishing a network of tertiary level educators and some targeted online research, to inform their review and analysis.

Findings

Internationals networks in sphere of higher education can be either subject‐specific or thematic in their aims and either global or restricted to one part of the world in their membership. Some are the outcome of activities at grass roots level while others are a response to policy initiatives from inter‐governmental organisations.

Practical implications

Although widespread, international networks in higher education are by no means unproblematic and questions inevitably arise as to their contribution and role in facilitating innovations in academic practice. The authors identify a number of issues concerning their modus operandi and roles that need to be addressed if they are to play a full part in contributing to academic practice in higher education.

Originality/value

By highlighting the nature and contributions of international networks faculty are alerted to this mode of academic communication and collaboration and the steps that need to be taken if the full potential of such networks is be realised.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Jennifer J. Esala, Leora Hudak, Alyce Eaton and Maria Vukovich

The purpose of this paper is to explore the “active ingredients” of integrated behavioral health care (IBHC) from the perspective of Karen refugee participants in an IBHC…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the “active ingredients” of integrated behavioral health care (IBHC) from the perspective of Karen refugee participants in an IBHC intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with participants (n=40) who have received an IBHC intervention for one year. These qualitative data are supplemented by descriptive quantitative data from those same participants.

Findings

This research suggested that IBHC increased awareness and access to behavioral health services, and that IBHC may be especially amenable to treating complex health conditions. The research also found that IBHC provided a point of regular contact for patients who had limited time with their primary care providers, which helped to enhance access to and engagement with health care.

Practical implications

IBHC has the potential to meet the complex needs of Karen resettled refugees living in an urban setting in the USA.

Originality/value

IBHC is a promising approach to help meet the mental health needs of refugees in the USA. There are, however, gaps in knowledge about the “active ingredients” of IBHC. This paper helps fill these gaps by studying how IBHC works from the perspective of a group of Karen refugees; these are critical perspectives, missing in the literature, which must be heard in order to better address the complex conditions and needs of resettled refugees.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 23 July 2018

Nancy Clark

The purpose of this paper is to describe Karen refugee women’s experience of resettlement and the factors which structured community capacity to support their mental health and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe Karen refugee women’s experience of resettlement and the factors which structured community capacity to support their mental health and well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

A postcolonial and feminist standpoint was used to bring Karen women’s voice to the knowledge production process. Data were collected through ethnographic field observation, in-depth semi-structured individual and focus group interviews with Karen women as well as healthcare and social service providers.

Findings

Three interrelated themes emerged from the data: Karen women’s construction of mental health as “stress and worry”; gender, language and health literacy intersected, shaping Karen women’s access to health care and social resources; flexible partnerships between settlement agencies, primary care and public health promoted community capacity but were challenged by neoliberalism.

Research limitations/implications

Karen women and families are a diverse group with a unique historical context. Not all the findings are applicable across refugee women.

Practical implications

This paper highlights the social determinants of mental health for Karen women and community responses for mitigating psychological distress during resettlement.

Social implications

Public health policy requires a contextualized understanding of refugee women’s mental health. Health promotion in resettlement must include culturally safe provision of health care to mitigate sources of psychological distress during resettlement.

Originality/value

This research brings a postcolonial and feminist analysis to community capacity as a public health strategy.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2022

Daniel Gilhooly and Chris Mu Htoo

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how teachers can use their Sgaw Karen students’ names as a means to gaining awareness of their students’ home culture, language and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how teachers can use their Sgaw Karen students’ names as a means to gaining awareness of their students’ home culture, language and personal stories.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study uses interviews with four Karen families to explore the meanings behind the names and nicknames given to Karen individuals.

Findings

The findings of this study reveal that Karen names can provide teachers important insights into Karen culture, history and language. Moreover, Karen names can also provide important biographical information about the student.

Research limitations/implications

This study only focuses on Sgaw Karen names and does not include other Karen subgroups like the Pwo Karen, who are also resettling in the USA. This study does not include all Sgaw Karen names, but the authors have made efforts to include Karen names from various regions of Burma and of different religious backgrounds.

Practical implications

Teachers and others working with culturally and linguistically diverse students like the Karen will gain a better understanding of the various ways that names are given across cultures. While this paper focuses on one particular ethnic group, it is believed that teachers need to expand their notions about how other non-European groups name their children and how these names may reveal something about the student’s heritage culture, history, language and the unique lived experiences of their students.

Social implications

Too often teachers and others working cross-culturally do not realize that other cultures follow different naming practices than those used in the USA. Teachers often mispronounce or misunderstand students’ names when the student comes from a cultural group unfamiliar to them. This paper helps a general audience better realize the unique approach Karen culture takes to naming children and how these names are often transformed to fit American naming conventions. As the title suggests, Karen students often feel embarrassed and take on a negative opinion of their given name as a result of a lack of awareness by teachers and others.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique perspective in the literature on the ways cultural naming conventions can serve teachers aspiring to incorporate biography-driven instruction into their classroom practices.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Miriam Sweeney

This paper seeks to position ready reference technologies as cultural artifacts that have meaning and value beyond pure functionality as a reference tool. The case study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to position ready reference technologies as cultural artifacts that have meaning and value beyond pure functionality as a reference tool. The case study aims to assert that locally created reference tools and technologies have much to offer as artifacts that encode cultural knowledge about the community, institution and profession.

Design/methodology approach

This case study consists of semi‐structural interviews with six library reference staff members about their experiences and interpretations of a collaboratively created ready reference technology that is used in their reference practice at a public library.

Findings

The results demonstrate there is value is exploring technologies as cultural artifacts in that they reveal otherwise hidden or obscured institutional values, labor practices, tensions associated with changing times in the profession, and the community culture throughout time.

Practical implications

There is benefit in exploring locally created ready reference tools as cultural artifacts to uncover hidden cultural knowledge about institutions, communities, and professional practices.

Originality/value

While there are studies of ready reference tools, they largely focus on the transition of these materials from print‐to‐digital. There was a gap in the literature about the meaning of the ready reference tools to their librarian creators/users. This study is a contribution to ready reference literature and starts to address this gap.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Karen Rupp‐Serrano

Literacy has been one of the most publicized societal problems of the past decade, and it is likely to continue as such for some time to come. Like many problems of modern…

Abstract

Literacy has been one of the most publicized societal problems of the past decade, and it is likely to continue as such for some time to come. Like many problems of modern society, it involves a variety of educational, social, and economic factors, and will therefore not be easily solved.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Scott P. Foster and Karen Dye

A recent article in Strategy + Business magazine set out that the three primary goals of the CEO for creating ‘business resilience’ include (1) securing the people of the…

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Abstract

A recent article in Strategy + Business magazine set out that the three primary goals of the CEO for creating ‘business resilience’ include (1) securing the people of the enterprise; (2) securing the core business of the enterprise (systems, facilities, infrastructure and processes); and (3) securing the business networks (such as the supply chain). Given these three goals, who is better suited to take on a leadership role in coordinating business continuity than the senior managers of corporate real estate (CRE) and workplace resource (WR) organisations? For several years, as the concept of Corporate Infrastructure Resource Management (CIRM) has evolved, senior CRE managers have sought out ways to create additional value for the enterprise’s core businesses. The authors believe that CRE organisations possess many of the competencies required to play significant roles in their business continuity programmes, and seizing this opportunity to fill the gaps can elevate the profile of workplace to the executive level. This paper presents a simple framework, based on five leverage points, that will enable CRE to take a more active leadership role in managing business continuity and to move to a ‘strategy and continuity’ model for managing corporate real estate.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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