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1 – 10 of 352
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Fei Fan and Kara Chan

Personal debt is a common problem among Hong Kong people. Personal loan marketers promote their products and services aggressively, especially to young consumers. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Personal debt is a common problem among Hong Kong people. Personal loan marketers promote their products and services aggressively, especially to young consumers. The purpose of this paper is to examine how young consumers respond to personal loan advertisements.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 38 interviewees in the age group of 18-25 years. They were asked to report their perceptions of three selected personal loan TV commercials and their attitudes toward personal loan advertisements in general.

Findings

Four themes were identified from the data analysis: a personal loan is a modern way of solving a debt problem; personal loan advertisements encourage materialism and overspending; personal loan advertisements are misleading; and personal loan advertisements do not affect me. The overall perception of these commercials is that borrowing money is easy and quick. Some report that they would try the product if they need to borrow money in the future.

Research limitations/implications

Given the small sample size, the findings cannot be generalized to the population. Future studies can use survey methodology to compare perceptions of personal loan advertisements by demographics.

Practical implications

Despite their effectiveness in communicating product features and benefits, personal loan advertisers suffer from negative brand image among young adults. The study has implications for socially responsible marketing for lenders.

Social implications

Credit counselors, policy makers, universities and employers should look into the need for raising the financial literacy of young adults.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on consumers’ response to personal loan advertisements among young adults.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Kara Chan, Tommy Tse, Daisy Tam and Anqi Huang

The purpose of this paper is to explore snacking behavior and perspectives on healthy and unhealthy food choices among adolescents in Mainland China.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore snacking behavior and perspectives on healthy and unhealthy food choices among adolescents in Mainland China.

Design/methodology/approach

Four focus-group interviews were conducted. Altogether 24 participants were recruited in Changsha, a second-tier city in China, through a convenience sampling process. They were asked to report their snacking behaviors, identify whether certain snacks are healthy or unhealthy and elaborate on factors affecting food choices.

Findings

Snacking was prevalent among the participants. The most frequently consumed snacks included fruit, milk and instant noodles. Participants’ evaluations for the healthiness of foods were based on the actual nutritional values of those foods, the effects on growth and body weight and word-of-mouth. Choice of snack was driven mainly by taste, image, convenience and health consciousness.

Research limitations/implications

The finding was based on a non-probability sample. The paper also did not explore the contexts where snacks were consumed.

Practical implications

Parents can make healthy snacks more accessible at home and at schools. Educators can teach adolescents how to read food labels. Schools can increase the availability of healthy snacks on campus. Social marketers can promote healthy snacks by associating them with fun and high taste.

Originality/value

This is the first paper on snacking behaviors among adolescents conducted in a second-tier city in China using focus-group methodology.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2022

Kara Chan and Qiqi Li

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the common attributes of brick-and-mortar retail shops liked by young adults in the digitalized retail context. The 7Ps of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the common attributes of brick-and-mortar retail shops liked by young adults in the digitalized retail context. The 7Ps of the marketing mix were used as a framework to shed insights for marketing strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study using personal interviews was designed. A convenience sample of 24 young adults from 20 to 22 years of age was asked to take photos, showing the exterior and interior of their favorite shop in Hong Kong. They were interviewed face to face to explain why they like these shops. Other information about the shopping context, including frequency of visits and whether shopping alone or with friends, was collected.

Findings

The favorite shops of young adults are clothing retailers and stores for snacks. Attributes of favorite shops include stylish product design, variety of choices, cozy physical environment, technology-assisted shopping process and customer-friendly return policy. Young adults seek taste and artistic presentation in consumption. Self-expression and social communication of consumption play a major role in retail brand love.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of this study was small and may not be generalizable to populations of different socioeconomic status. A quantitative survey can be conducted to further examine the topic.

Practical implications

This study deepens the understanding of how young adults perceive product, store and process attributes of shops that are related to retail brand love. Tangible qualities such as product and physical space played a more important role than intangible attributes such as friendly frontline or sales staff. The results imply that retailers need to pay attention to a shop’s product offering, interior design, as well as develop a seamless integration of online and offline shopping processes to engage customers.

Originality/value

There are very few studies of young consumers and retail brand love using qualitative methods. This study contributes to a deeper understanding of young consumers’ perception of the retail stores that they love in the digitalized retail landscape.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Kara Chan, Lennon Tsang and Jie Chen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the banking experiences and awareness of marketing efforts of banks among youth in mainland China.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the banking experiences and awareness of marketing efforts of banks among youth in mainland China.

Design/methodology/approach

Four focus-group interviews were conducted. A convenience sample of 26 participants aged 17 to 20 years was recruited in Laiwu, Shandong, a medium-sized city in China. They were asked to report experiences that could illustrate good and bad banking services. They were also asked to recall bank marketing promotions.

Findings

Participants’ perceived service quality of banks was determined by staff attitude, service delivery, physical environment and comparison of user experience. The marketing communication activities they recalled most frequently included product placements, advertising slogans, entertaining commercials and co-branding with online games.

Research limitations/implications

The findings were based on a non-probability sample. The study also did not differentiate between personal experience and indirect experience with family and friends. Similar studies can be conducted in large cities or in rural China to compare banking experiences in different social economic settings. Further studies can be designed using quantitative methodology to measure the importance of various factors in influencing perceptions of service quality. Online banking experience can also be studied in the future.

Practical implications

Banks in China can enhance their competitiveness and brand reputation through raising the professionalism of their front-line staff, improving efficiency and transparency and streamlining the service process. Banks can make contacts with youth through offline and online promotional activities, such as co-branding with popular online games.

Originality/value

This is the first study on banking services among youth conducted in a medium-sized city in China.

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2018

Kara Chan and Lennon Tsang

This study aims to test a conceptual model using public attitudes toward biomedicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to predict respondents’ medical treatment choice.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test a conceptual model using public attitudes toward biomedicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to predict respondents’ medical treatment choice.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative online survey was conducted using quota sampling. Altogether 1,321 questionnaires from Hong Kong residents of age 15 years or above were collected.

Findings

Attitudes toward biomedicine in relation to TCM and perceived cost of TCM consultation were found to be significant variables in predicting respondents’ medical treatment choice of treatment. Perceived efficacy of TCM, however, was not a significant predictor. Older respondents, as well as respondents with higher education, were less likely to consult biomedicine first when ill. They were also less likely to consult biomedicine exclusively.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses a convenience sample recruited through personal networks. The findings cannot be generalized to the rest of the population.

Practical implications

Respondents in the study generally perceived TCM’s efficacy to be high, but not high enough to make it the medical treatment of choice. To promote TCM in Hong Kong, there is a need to enhance trust in it. This can be achieved through strengthening scientific research and development of TCM, enhancing professional standards of TCM practitioners and educating the public about the qualifications of TCM practitioners. Strategic channel planning to reach potential target and reducing the time cost of TCM medication should be examined.

Originality/value

The study is the first to relate attitudes to and perceptions of TCM with medical treatment choices in Hong Kong.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Kara Chan

Discusses the factors that determine a child’s sense of materialism, and how this can be measured, based on face‐to‐face interviews with 246 children to measure their…

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Abstract

Discusses the factors that determine a child’s sense of materialism, and how this can be measured, based on face‐to‐face interviews with 246 children to measure their responses to 14 items; the background to the study is a concern that advertising may influence children to steal in order to buy advertised products. Reviews the literature relating to consumer socialisation, which shows that children understand the concept of possession and value it from a very young age. Concludes that Hong Kong Chinese children do not endorse strongly materialistic values; younger children were more materialistic than older children, and, contrary to the research literature, the current study found no gender difference in materialistic values. Finds also that mere exposure to television advertising and programmes does not contribute to greater materialism.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Kara Chan, Hongxia Zhang and Iris Wang

Looks at attitudes of Chinese adolescents to materialism, including the effect of age on materialism and the influence of family and peers. Outlines the values of Chinese…

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Abstract

Looks at attitudes of Chinese adolescents to materialism, including the effect of age on materialism and the influence of family and peers. Outlines the values of Chinese culture: thrift, respect for parents, group orientation, social harmony, good manners, face, and academic achievement; these values could impact both positively and negatively on endorsement of materialistic values. Points out that parental expectations of their children’s material success have increased since the one child per family policy. Finds that older adolescents were more materialistic than younger ones, that more materialistic adolescents tended to communicate more with their peers and less with their parents, and that television (which now reaches 92 per cent of households) has no effect because the Chinese government’s strict rules about TV programmes’ content requires them to reflect traditional values.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Yu Leung Ng and Kara Chan

The purpose of this study is to examine how Chinese adolescent girls and boys interpret female images in gendered advertisements based on Tobin et al.’s (2010) gender…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how Chinese adolescent girls and boys interpret female images in gendered advertisements based on Tobin et al.’s (2010) gender self-socialization model (GSSM).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 48 Hong Kong adolescents studying in high schools or university year one participated in a focus group study. Four advertisements with different types of female images were presented. Interviewees were asked to discuss the appearance, the personality and the work and family life of the female characters in the advertisements. Interviewers then asked them to select the one most closely representing their ideal female image.

Findings

Most of the interviewees chose an urban sophisticate as the character closest to their ideal female image. Female interviewees identified with the urban sophisticate and aspired to the cultured nurturer image. However, they rejected the strong woman and the “flower vase” female images.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of the findings was limited because of the small sample size and non-probability sampling.

Practical implications

When targeting adolescents, advertisers should consider using female images displaying a personality that is neither too strong nor too weak.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate how Hong Kong adolescents interpret female images from gendered advertisements. This study also clarifies the gender concepts to explain how adolescents perceive gendered advertisements.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Kara Chuen and James U. McNeal

Explores the attitudes to TV advertising of Chinese children, the “little emperors/empresses“ who now have enormous influence on the market, largely as a result of the…

Abstract

Explores the attitudes to TV advertising of Chinese children, the “little emperors/empresses“ who now have enormous influence on the market, largely as a result of the one‐child policy that China adopted in 1979; like children elsewhere, they appear to pay less attention to commercials as they get older and become more sceptical about their truthfulness. Outlines the methodology used in the research, differences between Hong Kong and mainland children, children’s favourite commercials, and their views of advertised versus non‐advertised brands. Moves on to regulation of children’s advertising: unlike many Western countries, there is a lack of specific regulation of TV advertising to children, and the rapid though uneven growth of TV advertising in China has led to irresponsible practices.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2002

Kara Chan, James U. McNeal and Fanny Chan

Examines how much attention urban mainland Chinese children pay to television commercials, their response to different types of commercials, and their perceptions of the…

Abstract

Examines how much attention urban mainland Chinese children pay to television commercials, their response to different types of commercials, and their perceptions of the quality of advertised and non‐advertised brands. Classifies the types of commercials seen as funny, animated, public service, celebrity endorsements, and those that increase knowledge, and relates these types to the four age groups of the children studied. Concludes that children pay a decreasing amount of attention to commercials as they get older, and that the link between liking a commercial and impulse buying of its product also lessens; confidence in advertised brands does not increase with age, but confidence in non‐advertised brands decreases with age.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

1 – 10 of 352