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Article

Kannan Ramaswamy and Saptarshi Purkayastha

This paper aims to report the findings from a longitudinal study of Indian business groups responding to the pro-market reforms that the government had initiated. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the findings from a longitudinal study of Indian business groups responding to the pro-market reforms that the government had initiated. It explores their diversification choices at the group level and the group performance consequences of these choices during a period of institutional changes (1990-2008).

Design/methodology/approach

Ordinary least squares regressions were used to analyze data spanning the 1988-2008 study period for 98 Indian business groups.

Findings

Results show that business groups that focused their portfolios in the early stages of institutional reforms tended to perform worse than their counterparts that did not do so. However, as market reforms became more established, business groups that made the transition from an unfocused to a more focused portfolio experienced superior performance consequences.

Originality/value

The findings underscore the temporal dimension of focusing and suggest that both changing strategy by refocusing business portfolio too early or waiting too long to refocus can hurt performance outcomes.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article

Julia Hartmann, Andrew Inkpen and Kannan Ramaswamy

The long-term energy transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy challenges the future of oil and gas firms. The purpose of this paper is to explore how the world’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The long-term energy transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy challenges the future of oil and gas firms. The purpose of this paper is to explore how the world’s largest oil and gas firms’ strategies are responding to the transition.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used content analysis of annual reports to examine the renewable strategies of the world’s largest publicly traded oil and gas companies. Data were analyzed using two complementary statistical methodologies to build a taxonomy of the patterns in strategic behaviors involving renewable energy.

Findings

Five transition archetypes are identified – three reflect an active pursuit of renewable energy, whereas the other two are more defensive in posture. The authors also find that the firm’s country context has an important bearing on renewable strategy. Both normative social pressures and regulatory pressures play key roles in influencing a firm’s commitment to a renewables’ strategy.

Research limitations/implications

Using an innovative research method, we develop a new taxonomy to classify how the world’s largest oil and gas firms are shaping the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy..

Originality/value

Using an innovative research method, the authors developed a new taxonomy to classify how the world’s largest oil and gas firms are shaping the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article

William E. Youngdahl, Kannan Ramaswamy and Kishore C. Dash

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of economic development on culture and the significance of cultural change on the evolution of offshoring of services…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of economic development on culture and the significance of cultural change on the evolution of offshoring of services and knowledge‐based activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper offers a conceptual model that links economic development, national cultural predispositions, and the future of offshoring service and knowledge functions. It builds on a range of academic literatures within these core areas to derive a set of propositions that offer insights into the manner in which the relative success and evolution of offshoring service and knowledge work would be impacted by a country's economic development posture and its cultural roots and value systems. The model presented here is also well complemented by examples from real offshoring projects to offer the reader a comprehensive picture of the central propositions put forth.

Findings

Several propositions, formulated at the multidisciplinary intersection of service operations management, strategy, and international studies, provide ample opportunities for further discipline‐specific and cross‐disciplinary examination of complex interactions of economic development, culture, and offshoring approaches.

Research limitations/implications

This form of conceptual research provides the basis for more rigorous theory development and testing. The aim of the conceptual analysis was to begin linking nascent research in the area of service and knowledge offshoring to an area of research that examines the links between economic development and culture.

Practical implications

Global operations managers dealing with extended service value chains that include offshore service providers must not only focus on dealing with cultural differences but they must also identify requisite cultural attributes for evolving service center roles.

Originality/value

By integrating perspectives from service operations management, strategy, and international studies, the paper provides new perspectives on offshoring of service and knowledge operations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part

Andrew Inkpen and Kannan Ramaswamy

While much of the debate and discourse on sustainability and environmentally friendly practices have focused on privately owned and operated organizations, enterprises…

Abstract

While much of the debate and discourse on sustainability and environmentally friendly practices have focused on privately owned and operated organizations, enterprises owned by the state have escaped scrutiny. This study focuses specifically on the oil and gas sector to explore the drivers that propel state-owned oil and gas producers, the national oil companies, to embrace sustainability practices. We find that the proportion of independent directors, international exposure, and international involvement influence sustainability practices.

Details

Sustainability, Stakeholder Governance, and Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-316-2

Keywords

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Article

Andrew Inkpen and Kannan Ramaswamy

As global integration between firms and countries continues to march forward, managers and strategy analysts will have to find new ways to deal with globalization. Many of

Abstract

Purpose

As global integration between firms and countries continues to march forward, managers and strategy analysts will have to find new ways to deal with globalization. Many of the founding assumptions of multinational corporation (MNC) strategy have undergone radical change. In this paper we examine five trends that MNC managers must consider as they create strategies to compete in the contemporary global marketplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents a discussion on five key trends that include: the end of the traditional multinational company and the emergence of a new approach to structuring and coordinating cross‐border activities; the declining relevance of geography and emerging interconnectedness across boundaries as industries globalize rapidly; the new wave of MNCs from India and China and their approach to global competition; the increasing relevance of crafting specifically tailored strategies to compete in emerging markets; and the imperative to manage knowledge on a global scale.

Findings

Continued globalization is inevitable and there are few industries, if any, untouched by global competitive forces.

Originality/value

Present some of the key trends that are significant enough to warrant the attention of global managers in general and strategy planners in particular.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article

Kannan Ramaswamy and William Renforth

Reports that transfer of ownership from government to private hands is touted as the only way to eliminate inefficiencies in the public sector. Argues that the alternative…

Abstract

Reports that transfer of ownership from government to private hands is touted as the only way to eliminate inefficiencies in the public sector. Argues that the alternative approach ‐ increasing competitive intensity through decontrol of restricted industries without changing ownership to private investors ‐ is likely to provide similar efficiency gains. Examines this hypothesis empirically in the context of state‐owned manufacturing enterprises in India that face effective competition from private sector firms. Shows, from analysis of variance of efficiency indicators of a longitudinal sample of 108 firms over the period 1988‐1992, that increasing levels of competition trigger corresponding increases in the overall level of technical efficiency of state‐owned enterprises that face competitive conditions. Provides a persuasive case for introducing competitive markets as an alternative to complete privatization, especially in monopolisitc settings.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Book part

Andrew Inkpen and Kannan Ramaswamy

This chapter examines the oil and gas industry and the efficacy of vertical integration strategies. Using multiple theoretical lenses ranging from the resource-based view…

Abstract

This chapter examines the oil and gas industry and the efficacy of vertical integration strategies. Using multiple theoretical lenses ranging from the resource-based view, transactions costs, and parenting perspective, the chapter considers different arguments associated with vertical integration. The 2011 breakup of ConocoPhillips and its global value chain helps address the question of which strategy is best – integrated or nonintegrated. We provide several conclusions about the structure of integration and value chains within the oil and gas industry. First, vertical integration based on the physical transfer of products between value chain activities will generate little firm advantage in the form of classical integration benefits, such as control over input quality or speed to market. Second, competing across the industry value chain as a hedge or strategy against industry cyclicality is not theoretically defensible. Third, pure play industry specialists can create value through management focus, agility, and, transparency for investors. Fourth, firms that compete across a wide range of industry value chain activities can create value-adding corporate strategies if they are able to leverage knowledge and assets across different industry sectors.

Details

Breaking up the Global Value Chain
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-071-6

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Sustainability, Stakeholder Governance, and Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-316-2

Content available
Article

Nanci Healy

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Abstract

Details

Sustainability, Stakeholder Governance, and Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-316-2

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