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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Steven H. Appelbaum, Neveen Asham and Kamal Argheyd

The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively investigate, through literature review of past studies and an in‐field case study, three different hypotheses regarding women

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively investigate, through literature review of past studies and an in‐field case study, three different hypotheses regarding women working in the IT sector and their career and promotional aspirations.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was used for data collection from female employees with varying professional specializations across several IT departments within the company. Questions for the survey were designed from the findings of the literature review.

Findings

The results obtained prove that married women who are intrinsically inspired to maintain their work‐family balance face higher stress and more conflicts than those who do not. In addition, the glass ceiling is still evident in today's corporations, but mainly affecting the older generation of women professionals. Also, the results slightly hinted at a ten‐year cutoff period, after which promotional aspiration is lost.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the limitations of the research conducted, further qualitative studies can be done to compare careers and promotional patterns between men and women in the IT departments; as well as those between women in IT departments and women working in other departments.

Practical implications

Employers should strive to provide their female employees practical solutions to allow for an easier balancing of work‐family responsibilities, such as flex‐times and telecommuting. At the same time, employers should place female employees in more opportunity‐enhancing positions within the corporation such that they can exploit or utilize their talents and increase their probability of climbing up the corporate ladder.

Originality/value

With a generous response rate, this paper provides a realistic perspective of professional females working within the IT domain as to their career and promotional aspirations.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Steven H. Appelbaum, Neveen Asham and Kamal Argheyd

The purpose of this research is to qualitatively investigate, through a literature review of past studies and an in‐field case study, three different hypotheses regarding

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to qualitatively investigate, through a literature review of past studies and an in‐field case study, three different hypotheses regarding women working in the IT sector and their career and promotional aspirations.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was used for data collection from female employees with varying professional specializations across several IT departments within the company. Questions for the survey were designed from the findings of the literature review.

Findings

The results obtained have proven that married women who are intrinsically inspired to maintain their work‐family balance face higher stress and more conflicts than those who do not. In addition, the glass ceiling was still evident in today's corporations, but mainly affecting the older generation of women professionals. Also, the results slightly hinted at a ten‐year cut‐off period, after which promotional aspiration is lost.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the limitations of the research conducted, further qualitative studies can be done to compare careers and promotional patterns between men and women in the IT departments, as well as those between women in IT departments and women working in other departments.

Practical implications

Employers should strive to provide their female employees with practical solutions to allow for an easier balancing of work‐family responsibilities, such as flexi‐time and telecommuting. At the same time, the employers should place the female employees in more opportunity‐enhancing positions within the corporation so that they can exploit or utilize their talents and increase the probability of climbing up the corporate ladder.

Originality/value

With a generous response rate, this paper provides a realistic perspective of professional females working within the IT domain with regard to their career and promotional aspirations.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Shamila Nabi Khan and Ahmed Kamal

In weaker institutions, lack of corporate social responsibility (CSR) constituencies causes organizations to naturally incline toward corporate socially irresponsible…

Abstract

Purpose

In weaker institutions, lack of corporate social responsibility (CSR) constituencies causes organizations to naturally incline toward corporate socially irresponsible actions. Grounded in the institutional theory, this paper aims to explore the nature of corporate social irresponsibility (CSIR) in the weaker institution and its effect on legitimacy and reputation. The presence of corporate ability moderates the impact of CSIR on legitimacy and reputation.

Design/methodology/approach

A list of manager’s contact information was generated from an online database. In total, 1,500 employees in 560 Pakistani organizations received the self-reported survey. In total, 203 managers working in 110 Pakistani organizations responded with the completed questionnaire that provided empirical support to the hypotheses.

Findings

Institutional drivers were positively significant to CSIR and negatively associated with the manager’s CSR attitudes. CSIR was negatively significant to legitimacy and reputation. Group differences between high and low corporate ability indicated that corporate ability played a vital role between CSIR and reputation.

Practical implications

These results have important implications for leaders, business-to-business and human resource (HR) managers in weaker institutions highlighting that organization’s supply chain partners consider adopting CSR practices. This can help the organization avoid undesirable and detrimental impact on its legitimacy and reputation, which are linked to irresponsible behaviors. HR managers should build CSR cognition in employees to bring effective change in the organization.

Originality/value

Lack of investigation into corporate ability and CSIR has raised questions about the organization’s efforts in the weaker institution that are sensitive to institutionalized corruption. This research adds to the literature by exploring how the organizations develop legitimacy and reputation while still acting irresponsibly in a weaker institution, presenting a paradox.

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